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AMERICAN UNIVERSITY • WASHINGTON, D.C 






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Digitized by the Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/americanuniversi2009amer 



American University 

Catalog 



2009-2010 Edition 

effective Fall 2009 



Washington, D.C. 



Directory 

American Universitj' 

4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW 

Washington, DC 20016 

General Information: 202-885-1000 

www.american.edu 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Battelle 


202-885-2446 

fax 202-885-2429 


Kogod School of Business 


202-885-1900 

fax 202-885-1992 


School of Communication 

Mary Graydon Center 


202-885-2060 

fax 202-885-2099 


School of International Service 


202-885-1600 

fax 202-885-2494 


School of Public Affairs 

Ward 


202-885-2940 

fax 202-885-2353 


Washington College of Law 

4801 Massachusetts Ave. NW 


202-274-4000 

fax 202-274-4130 


Admissions 


202-885-6000 

fax 202-885-6014 


Alumni Programs 


202-885-5960 

fax 202-885-5964 


Campus Life 

Butler Pavilion 401 


202-885-3310 

fax 202-885- 1769 


Financial Aid 


202-885-6100 

fax 202-885-1 129 


Media Relations 


202-885-5950 

fax 202-885-5959 


Registrar 

Asbury 2nd tloor 


202-885-2200 

fax 202-885-1052 


Student Accounts 

Asbury 300 


202-885-3541 

fax 202-885-1139 



American University Catalog is published by 
the Office of the University Registrar 

Linda Bolden-Pitcher, University Registrar 
Mary-Ellen Jones, Assistant University Registrar/Editor 
Michael W. Giese, CurriculunvTublications Coordinator 



Limitations on Catalog Provisions 

The educational process necessitates change. This publica- 
tion must be considered informational and not binding on the 
university. 

Each step of the educational process, from admission through 
graduation, requires appropriate approval by university offi- 
cials. The university must, therefore, reserve the right to change 
admission requirements or to refuse to grant credit or a degree if 
a student does not satisfy the university, in its sole judgment, that 
he or she has satisfactorily met its requirements. 



University Liability 

Faculty, students, staff, and guests are responsible for their 
personal property, clothing, and possessions. The university 
does not carry any insurance to cover losses of such articles nor 
does it assume any responsibility for such losses. 



Contents 



University Administration and Board of Trustees 2 

Academic Calendar 3 

Introduction 5 

University Profile 5 

Degrees Conferred, 2007-2008 10 

Undergraduate Programs 11 

Graduate Programs 12 

Certificate Programs 13 

Admission Requirements 15 

Undergraduate Study 15 

Graduate Study 17 

International Students 18 

Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 19 

Tuition, Housing and Dining, and Fees 19 

Undergraduate Financial Aid 24 

Graduate Financial Aid 27 

Veterans' Benefits 29 

Campus Life 30 

SUident Learning and Development Services 30 

Campus Life Centers 32 

Intercultural Programs and Services 34 

Career Services, Internships, and Merit Awards 35 

Registration 38 

Academic Regulations 44 

Academic Integrity Code 44 

Student Academic Grievance Policy 44 

Student Records 45 

Grading System 48 

Graduation 49 

Graduate Academic Standards and Degree 

Requirements 50 

Undergraduate Academic Standards and 

Degree Requirements 56 

Undergraduate University Degree Requirements .... 61 

College Writing and English Competency 61 

University Mathematics Requirement 62 

Undergraduate Academic Honors 63 

University Honors Program 63 

General Education Program 64 



College of Arts and Sciences 73 

American Studies 75 

Anthropology 76 

Arab Studies 80 

Art 81 

Asian Studies 89 

Biology 90 

Chemistry 93 

Computer Science 97 

Economics 100 

School ofEducation, Teaching and Health 108 

Environmental Science 1 24 

History 127 

Israel Studies 130 

Jewish Studies 1 30 

Language and Foreign Studies 1 32 

Liberal Studies 140 

Literature 141 

Mathematics and Statistics 144 

Multi-Ethnic Studies 150 

North American Studies 1 50 

Performing Arts 152 

Philosophy and Religion 160 

Physics 164 

Pre-engineering 166 

Prelaw 167 

Premedical 167 

Psychology 169 

Sociology 173 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. . . 176 
Women's and Gender Studies 178 

Kogod School of Business 181 

School of Communication 206 

School of International Service 223 

School of Public Affairs 255 

Government 257 

Justice, Law and Society 264 

Public Administration and Policy 271 

Washington College of Law 282 

Washington Semester 284 

AU Abroad; Abroad at AU 288 

Course Descriptions 292 

Faculty, 2008-2009 427 

Index 457 

Campus Map inside back cover 



University Administration 



Board of Trustees 



Cornelius M. Kerwin, President 

Scott A. Bass, Pmvost 

Gail S. Hanson, Vice President of Campus Life 

Mary E. Kennard, Vice President and General Counsel 

Donald L. Myers, Vice President of Finance and Treasurer 

Kay J. Mussell, Interim Senior Vice Provost and Dean of 

Academic Affairs 
Richard M. Durand, Dean. Kogod School of Business 
Louis W. Goodman, Dean, School of International Service 
Claudio M. Grossman, Dean, Washington College of Law 
Larry Kirkman, Dean. School of Communication 
William M. LeoGrande, Dean. School of Public Affairs 
Peter Starr, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Linda Bolden-Pitcher, University Registrar 
William A. Mayer, University Librarian 



Gary M. Abramson,* Qiairman 

Jeffrey A. Sine,* Vice Chair 

Gina F. Adams* 

Stephanie M. Bennett-Smith 

Richard Beyer 

Patrick Butler* 

Edward R. Carr* 

Jack C. Cassell* 

Gary D. Cohn* 

Pamela M. Deese* 

Jerome King Del Pino 

David R. Drobis* 

Marc N. Duber* 

Fuad El-Hibri 

Hani M.S. Farsi* 

C.A. Daniel Gasby 

Thomas A. Gottschalk 

Gisela B. Huberman* 

C. Nicholas Keating, Jr.* 

Cornelius M. Kerwin* 

Margery Kraus* 

Charles H. Lydecker* 

Robyn Rafferty Mathias* 

Alan L. Meltzer* 

Regina L. Muehlhauser* 

Arthur J. Rothkopf 

Mark L. Schneider 

John R. Schol 

Neal A. Sharma* 

Stephen Silvia 

Virginia Stallings 

David Teslicko* 



* Alumna/alumnus of American University 



American University is an equal opportunity and affirmative action university and employer. American University does not 
discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, personal appearance, sexual 
orientation, gender identity and expression, family responsibilities, political affiliation, disability, source of income, place of 
residence or business, or certain veteran status in its programs and activities. For information, contact the Dean of Students 
( DOS(S!american.edu ), Director of Policy & Regulatory Affairs ( employeerelations@american.edu ) or Dean of Academic 
Affairs, ( academicaffairs^american.edu ), or at American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 
20016,202-885-1000. 



Academic Calendar 2009-2010 



The academic calendar is divided into fall and spring semesters of approximately 1 5 weeks each and summer sessions of 
varying length. The last week of the fail and spring semesters is set aside for final examinations. If no final examination is given, 
the course will meet for a final class during the scheduled final examination period. 

The holidays and vacations usually observed by the university are as follows: Labor Day; Thanksgiving 
(Wednesday-Sunday); Christmas Eve/Christmas Day and New Year's Eve/New Year's Day (included in the mid-year 
intersession break); Martin Luther King, Jr. Day; Inauguration Day (every four years); Memorial Day; and Independence Day. 
Spring break is the week following the spring semester midterm. Classes continue until 1 0:40 p.m. the evening before a holiday 
or vacation period. 



Fall Semester 2009 



August 16-23 


Su-Su 


August 2 1 


F 


August 24 


M 


August 28 


F 


September 1 


T 


September 2 


W 


September 4 


F 


September 7 


M 


September 14 


M 


September 2 1 


M 


September 28 


M 


October 16 


F 


October 23 


F 


October23-25 


F-Su 


October 24 


S 


October 26 


M 


November 1 


Su 


November 6 


F 


November 15 


Su 


November 24 


T 


November 25-29 W-Su 


December 1 


T 


December 4 


F 



December 7-8 M-T 
December 9 W 
December 10-12 Th-S 
December 14 M 
December 10-17 Th-Th 
December 24-25 Th-F 
December 3 1 - 

January I Th-F 



Welcome Week 

Last day to register for fall 2007 without a late fee 

Fall classes begin 

Late registration (with $50 fee) begins 

Students begin submitting applications for fall graduation 

Late registration for fall ends 

Freshman/undergraduate transfer spring semester admission application deadline for students 

living outside the United States 

Mathematics Equivalency Examination 

Last day to add a fall course or change a grade option 

Last day to drop a fall course for a 100% refund and without a "W" recorded 

Labor Day; no classes, university offices closed 

Last day to drop a fall course for a 50% refiind 

Last day to add an internship or Cooperative Education Field Experience 

Last day to drop a fall course for a 25% refiind (no refiuids after this date) 

Last day to add an independent reading course or study project 

Early warning notices due in Registrar's Office 

Fall Break; no classes, university offices open 

Last day to drop a fall course (mid-term) 

Family Weekend 

English Competency Examination 

Spring 20 1 advance registration (with billing) begins ' 

Undergraduate transfer spring semester admission application deadline for students 

living in the United States 

Theses and dissertations due in deans' offices for fall degree candidates 

Eiarly Decision freshman fall semester admission/financial aid application deadline 

Tuesday classes cancelled; Friday classes meet. 

Thanksgiving holiday; no classes; university offices closed Thursday and Friday 

Freshman spring semester admission application deadline for students living in the United States 

Fall classes end 

Theses and dissertations due in Registrar's Office for fall degree candidates 

Spring 2009 advance registration (with billing) ends 

Fall final examinations 

Fall study day; no classes 

Fall final examinations 

Fall final examinations (for Wednesday classes) 

Fall final grades due 

Winter holiday; university offices closed 

New Year holiday; university offices closed 



Academic Calendar 2009-2010 



Spring Semester 2010 



January 3-10 Su- 
January 8 F 

January 1 1 M 



January 15 



January 18 


M 


January 20 


W 


January 25 


M 


February 1 


M 


February 6 


S 


February 8 


M 


February 15 


M 


March 1 


M 


March 5 


F 


March 7-14 


Su- 


March 27 


S 


March 29 


M 



April 26 
April 27 



M 



April 28-May 4 W-' 


May 1 


S 


May 3-7 


M-1 


May 7 


F 


May 8 


S 


May 9 


Su 


Summer Sessions 


May 10 


M 


May 17 


M 


May 21 


F 


May 31 


M 


June 4 


F 


June 5 


S 


June 7 


M 


June 24 


Th 


June 28 


M 


July 1 


Th 


July 5 


M 


July 9 


F 


July 16 


F 


Augusts 


Th 



■Su Spring Welcome Week 

Last day to register for spring 2010 without a late fee 

Spring classes begin 

Late registration (with $50 fee) begins 

Students begin submitting applications for spring graduation 

Late registration for spring ends 

Freshman fall semester admission application deadline 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day; no classes, university offices closed 

Mathematics Equivalency Examination 

Last day to add a spring course or change a grade option 

Last day to drop a spring course for a 100% refiind and without a "W" recorded 

Last day to drop a spring course for a 50% reflind 

Last day to add an internship or Cooperative Education Field Experience 

English Competency Examination 

Last day to drop a spring course for a 25% refund (no refunds after this date) 

Last day to add an independent reading course or study project 

Early warning notices due in Registrar's Office 

Freshman fall semester financial aid application deadline 

Undergraduate transfer fall and spring semester financial aid application deadline 

Last day to drop a spring class (mid-term) 
•Su Spring break; no classes, university offices open Monday through Friday 

English Competency Examination 

Summer 2010 registration (with payment) and Fall 2010 advance registration (with billing) begins 

Theses and dissertations due in deans' offices for spring degree candidates 

Spring classes end 

Theses and dissertations due in Registrar's Office for spring degree candidates 

Spring study day; no classes 
T Spring final examinations 

Undergraduate transfer fall semester admission apphcation deadline for students hving outside 

the United States 
F Spring final grades due 

Commencement Weekend Activities 

Commencement Ceremonies: School of Communication (9:00 a.m.); 

Kogod Schoolof Business (1:00 p.m.); School of International Service (4:30 p.m.) 

Commencement Ceremonies: School of Public Affairs (9:00 a.m.); 

College of Arts and Sciences ( 1 :00 p.m.) 
2010 (Dates subject to change) 

7-week summer session begins 

Students begin submitting applications for summer graduation 

First 6-week, first 3-week, and cross summer sessions begin 

Last day to add an internship for the summer 

Memorial Day; no classes, university offices closed 

First 3-week summer session ends 

English Competency Examination 

Second 3-week summer session begins 

7-week, second 3-week, and first 6-week summer sessions end 

Second 6-week day and evening summer sessions begin 

Undergraduate transfer fall semester admission application deadline for students living in the United States 

Independence Day observed; no classes, university offices closed 

Fall 2010 advance registration (with billing) ends 

Theses and dissertations due in deans' offices for summer degree candidates 

End of summer sessions 

Theses and dissertations due in Registrar's Office for summer degree candidates 



Introduction 

• University Profile 

• Undergraduate and Graduate Programs 

• Enrollment 



American University was chartered by an Act of Congress in 
1893 and founded under the auspices of the United Methodist 
Church. Today it is an independent coeducational university 
with more than 1 1.000 students enrolled in undergraduate, mas- 
ter's, doctoral, and professional degree programs. Located on an 
84-acre residential campus in upper northwest Washington, 
D.C., the university attracts students from all 50 states, the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the territories, and nearly 1 50 
foreign countries. 

A short distance from Washington's centers of government, 
business, research, commerce, and art, the American University 
campus is located in a scenic residential area in Northwest 
Washington, D.C. The 37 campus buildings include the univer- 
sity library, administrative and academic buildings, residence 
halls, an interdenominational religious center, and a sports cen- 
ter Facilities include 24-hour computer laboratories, radio and 
TV studios, science laboratories, art sUidios, recital halls, and a 
theatre. The Washington College of Law is located a half mile 
from the campus on Massachusetts Avenue. The satellite Tenley 
Campus, the location of the Washington Semester program, is 
located a mile from the university's main campus on Nebraska 
Avenue. 

American University offers a wide range of undergraduate 
and graduate programs through its six major divisions: College 
of Arts and Sciences; Kogod School of Business; School of 
Communication; School of Public Affairs; School of Interna- 
tional Service; and Washington College of Law. 



The distinguished faculty of American University includes 
renowned experts and scholars of national and international rep- 
utation in public affairs, law, history, economics, business, inter- 
national relations, education, science, communication, and the 
arts. In addition to the over six hundred members of its fiill-time 
faculty, adjunct faculty are drawn from the Washington, D.C. 
professional community, including policy makers, diplomats, 
journalists, artists, writers, scientists, and business leaders. 

The resources of a capital city are unlike any other in the 
world. Although an important center of business, finance, and 
media, next to government, education is the largest industry in 
the District of Columbia. 

Washington, D.C. is a city of learning resources in every dis- 
cipline, from the arts and humanities to the sciences to public af- 
fairs. The Smithsonian Institution, John F. Kennedy Center for 
the Perfonning Arts, National Gallery of Art, National Institutes 
of Health, National Library of Medicine, Library of Congress, 
National Archives, World Bank, Brookings Institution, more 
than 140 embassies and chanceries, and the headquarters of 
many associations and international organizations are located in 
the Washington, D.C. area. The libraries, museums, and art gal- 
leries of Washington contain unsurpassed collections. These re- 
sources are sites for research, field trips, internships, and 
employment. Because of these resources, American University 
students can put their education to work in Washington as they 
could nowhere else in the country. 



University Profile 



Historical Origins 

American University was incorporated by the government of 
the District of Columbia in 1891 and chartered by Act of Con- 
gress in 1893 as a United Methodist Church-related institution. 
The university's first building was completed in 1898; its first 
class graduated in 1916. 

Character 

American University is a leader in global education, enroll- 
ing a diverse student body from throughout the United States 
and more than 1 60 countries and providing opportunities for ac- 



ademic excellence, public service, and intemships in the nation's 
capital and around the world. 

Location 

Residential area of upper northwest Washington, D.C. 
Calendar 

Two semesters, summer sessions 



6 Introduction 



Fall 2008 Enrollment 

Undergraduate: 6,023 
Graduate: 3,297 
Law: 1,667 

Student/Faculty Ratio 

14:1 

Number of Faculty 

591 full-time faculty 

94 percent of fijll-time faculty hold the highest degree in 

their field 

Freshman Profile (Fall 2007) 

Average unweighted high school GPA: 3.53 
Male/female ratio: 35/65 
Middle 50% SAT I: 1180-1350 
Middle 50% ACT: 26-30 

Financial Aid 

Approximately 77 percent of students receive some form of 
financial aid 

Academic Divisions 

College of Arts and Sciences 
Kogod School of Business 
School of Communication 
School of International Service 
School of Public Affairs 
Washington College of Law 

Academic Programs 

57 bachelor's programs 

51 master's programs 

8 doctoral programs 

J.D., S.J.D.. and LL.M. 

Students have the opportunity to create individual 

interdisciplinary programs at the bachelor's and masters 's 

levels. Certificate programs and an associate degree 

program are offered as well. 

AU Abroad: More than 850 AU students annually study 

abroad on programs offered by AU Abroad and other areas 

within the university. Undergraduates select from more than 

100 study abroad programs which span diverse culhires and 

languages on all continents. Students may study in any 

subject area, for a year, semester, or summer. Intensive 

language study and/or internships are offered at many sites. 

Abroad at AU: International students have the opportunity 

to attend American University for a semester or year and 

become fully integrated into the academic, social, and 

cultural life of the university. 

Consortium of Universities of the Washington 

Metropolitan Area: American University participates in a 

program through which students may take courses not 

offered by their home institutions at any of the other 

consortium member schools. 

University Honors Program: A comprehensive program of 

honors options drawn from the General Education 

curriculum and departmental course offerings for qualified 



undergraduate students. The program is characterized by 
small seminars, individualized attention from faculty, 
unique access to the resources of Washington, D.C., and the 
special atmosphere of an honors community of committed 
faculty and students. 

Washington Semester Program: undergraduate programs 
focusing on American politics (national government, public 
law); economic policy; gender and politics; international 
business and trade; international environment and 
development; international politics and foreign policy; 
justice; journalism; peace and conflict resolution, and 
transforming coinmunities; all include internships. 

Campus Life 

The Office of Campus Life integrates students into a diverse 
university community; promotes their intellectual, social, 
and spiritual development; and, in collaboration with the 
faculty, prepares them for lifelong learning and global 
citizenship. 

Campus Life offices include: Academic Support Center; 
Community Service; Counseling Center; Disability Support 
Services; Gay. Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Ally 
Resource Center (GLBTA); Housing and Dining Programs; 
International Student & Scholar Services (ISSS); Kay 
Spiritual Life Center; Learning Services; Mediation 
Services; Multicultural Affairs; New Student Programs; and 
Student Health Center. 

Career Center 

Support and programs for internships, co-ops, off campus 
federal work study, career preparation, nationally 
competitive merit awards , and comprehensive career 
services at the undergraduate and graduate levels Students 
and employers use an on-line system — AU CareerWeb — to 
access internships and jobs as well as job fairs and campus 
interviews. 

Cocurricular Activities 

Students may participate in student government, residence 
hall government, student media (print, radio, and TV) and 
any of more than 1 60 clubs and organizations; 1 fi-atemities 
and 1 1 sororities; and varsity, recreational, and intramural 
sports. 

Honorary Societies 

Undergraduate students have the opportunity to be elected to 
the AU chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest honorary 
scholastic society for exceptional academic achievement in the 
liberal arts. Election to the American University chapter of Phi 
Kappa Phi is also available for qualified students, as well as 
Golden Key (recognizing outstanding scholarship, service, and 
leadership for students in all academic fields) and the National 
Society of Collegiate Scholars (honoring students for outstand- 
ing scholarship and community service). 

Many academic disciplines have chapters of national honor 
societies as well: 



Introduction 7 



Alpha Kappa Psi (Lambda Nu Chapter): dedicated to 

professional development, ethical standards and service in 

business conduct 

Alpha Lambda Delta: honor society for outstanding 

scholastic achievement for first-year students 

Alpha Phi Sigma: national honor society for criminal justice 

recognizing scholarship in the justice field 

Beta Gamma Sigma: business management society 

Epsilon Chi Omicron: international business society seeking 

to enhance educational field and to provide networking 

opportunities 

Phi Beta Kappa (Phi Kappa Phi Chapter): for exceptional 

academic achievement in the liberal arts 

Pi Alpha Alpha: national honor society for public affairs and 

administration (graduate students only) 

Pi Alpha Delta: prelaw honor society open to all 

undergraduates 

Pi Sigma Alpha: national political science honor society 

recognizing academic and professional achievement 

Sigma Iota Rho (Alpha Chapter): offering interdisciplinary 

scholarly recognition for students in the field of international 

relations 

Upsilon Pi Epsilon: international honor society that 

recognizes academic excellence in computer science. 

WAML-FM Radio 

WAMU 88.5 FM is the leading public radio station for NPR 
news and information in the greater Washington, D.C. area. It is 
member-supported, professionally-staffed, and licensed to 
American University. Since 1961, WAMU has provided pro- 
gramming to a growing audience of more than 575,900 listeners 
in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. The sta- 
tion's 24-hour formal blends a unique mixture of news, public 
affairs talk programming, and traditional American music. 
Home to a team of award-winning local reporters and acclaimed 
talk radio hosts, WAMU offers comprehensive coverage of lo- 
cal, national, and international events. Deeply committed to the 
Washington, D.C. metro area, WAMU produces regular and 
special programming that reflects the unique environment of the 
D.C. Metro area. The WAMU Community Council, a citizens' 
advisory panel, sponsors forums to find ways that radio can shed 
light on difficult problems and complicated issues. 

University Campus 

The 76-acre main campus and 8-acre Tenley satellite campus 
are within one mile of each other The Washington College of 
Law is located on Massachusetts Avenue, a half mile from the 
main campus. 

University facilities include admini.slralive and academic 
buildings; housing for about 3.900 students; an interdenomina- 
tional religious center; specialized natural science facilities; a 
computing center open 24 hours a day, plus 1 3 computer labora- 
tories around campus; two electronic auditoriums (one includes 
video conferencing capabilities); numerous classrooms with the 
latest in multimedia prescniation capability; radio and TV stu- 



dios; recital halls; and a comprehensive, multipurpose sports 
and convocation center. 

The Harold and Sylvia Greenberg Theatre is a showcase to 
the university's commitment to performing arts. It is a 
state-of-the art 300 seat-theatre allowing students the opportu- 
nity to perform in a top-quality setting, thereby enriching the 
program, the university and the Washington. DC community 

American University's Katzen Arts Center, named for Wash- 
ington area benefactors Dr. and Mrs. Cyrus Katzen, brings all 
the visual and performing arts programs at AU into one 
1 30,000-square-foot space. Designed to foster interdisciplinary 
collaboration in the arts, the Katzen includes the three-story 
American University Museum, the Abramson Family Recital 
Hall, the Studio Theatre and Dance Studio, an electronics studio, 
practice rooms, rehearsal space and classrooms. 

Residence Halls 

Six residence halls on the main campus accommodate 2,900 
students per year. The Park Bethesda apartment building, lo- 
cated two miles from campus, is managed by AU and can house 
585 graduate, law, and upper-class undergraduates. Three resi- 
dence halls on the Tenley Campus provide housing for 450 
Washington Semester students. 

University Library 

The Jack 1. and Dorothy G Bender Library and Learning Re- 
sources Center serves as a gateway to a wide array of print re- 
sources and electronic information and offers many services to 
support student and faculty research. It provides access to exten- 
sive electronic information through more than 1 ,700 subscribed 
databases and other electronic resources. Print collections in- 
clude more than 1 million volumes, 1 . 1 million microforms, and 
2,750 journals. Media collections include 1 1,000 films, videos, 
and multimedia, and over 3 7.000 recordings and 1 3 ,000 musical 
scores. 

Primary access to the collections is through ALADIN, the 
web site for the Washington Research Library Consortium 
(WRLC). American University smdents and faculty' may bor- 
row materials from all eight members of WRLC. Additional li- 
brary resources may be accessed via the library's CD-ROM 
network or through the AU library web site: 
www. I ibrary . american . edti/ . 

The library makes available 1 00 public access computers, 30 
circulating laptops, and offers 1 1 6 dataports and wireless con- 
nectivity for those who bring their own laptops. The library's cir- 
culating laptops may be borrowed from the Copy Center desk 
for use in the Bender building. The Anderson computing com- 
plex located on the lower level of Anderson residence hall offers 
155 computers and five classrooms. From the Copy Center 
desk, users may borrow laptop computers for use in the Bender 
building. 

The library's Special Collections houses rare materials, such 
as books, manuscripts, and personal papers. Among the more 
important holdings are the Artemas Martin collection of mathe- 
matical texts, the Charies Nelson Spinks collection of artistic 



8 Introduction 



and historical works of Japan, the Irwin M. Heine collection of 
literary works, and Christopher Johnson collection of William 
Faulkner books. Playbills form a significant set of the collec- 
tions, with the James Carroll and Iris Lipkowitz collections most 
notable among them. Other significant collections include the 
John R. Hickman collection, the records of the National Peace 
Corps Association, the Friends of Colombia Archives, the re- 
cords of the National Commission on the Public Service, and the 
records of Women Strike for Peace. The University Archives 
reside in the library. 

Technology and Computing Resources 

All students receive an EagleNei user account, an "amer- 
ican.edu" e-mail address, and a personal web page, if desired. 
Computing resources are delivered via a fiber optic network 
providing over 7,000 connection points, including all residence 
hall rooms. Wireless network access is also available throughout 
the entire campus. High-capacity dedicated Intemet service is 
available to everyone, and generous data storage for academic 
assignments and e-mail is provided on state-of-the-art servers 
available 24 hours a day throughout the year, except for occa- 
sional maintenance periods. 

There are 1 9 computer laboratories on campus offering a va- 
riety of personal computer and Macintosh systems, as well as 
fee-based high-speed laser printing. There are general-purpose 
facilities available to all snjdents, some open 24 hours a day dur- 
ing most of the academic year There are also many specialized 
labs supporting specific academic disciplines. Use of these labs 
may be restricted to students taking relevant courses or enrolled 
in specific degree programs. Labs are staffed by fijll-time pro- 
fessionals, graduate assistants and student assistants who pro- 
vide support for a broad range of software applications. 

The EagleNet network provides students with access to 
site-licensed software and the resources of ALADIN. the uni- 
versity's on-line library catalog. ALADIN is the gateway to the 
library holdings of Washington-area universities that share ac- 
cess to a broad range of electronic research resources. EagleNet 
also enables students to participate in a growing number of 
courses that use the web to enhance the classroom experience. 
On-line academic collaboration is provided to the campus using 
software tools such as Blackboard Courselnfo and other elec- 
tronic resources. 

The Help Desk answers software questions and provides 
general computer troubleshooting assistance via telephone, 
web, and e-mail. Throughout the year a variety of training 
classes are offered to help members of the academic community 
use computing resources. 

Although limited dial-up facilities are available for 
off-campus use of EagleNet, nonresident students are encour- 
aged to arrange for Intemet service through a private Intemet 
provider For those with laptop computers equipped with Ether- 
net network cards, public EagleNet access ports are available at 
various locations throughout campus. Laptop computers and 



other devices equipped for wireless communication using the 
802. lib standard can also be used anywhere on campus. 

All students must agree to the terms of the university's PoZ/cy 
on the App)X)priate Use oj Information Technology Resources 
which is in the Policies and Guidelines section of the Student 
Handbook. 

Athletics and Recreation 

American University encourages physical fitness throughout 
its community and strives to include in the educational experi- 
ence of all students habits of fitness that integrate a sound mind 
with a sound body. 
Athletics IVIission Statement 

The Athletics Department will excel athletically in the Patriot 
League at the highest levels of achievement while maintaining 
the academic standards of the university and both the letter and 
spirit of the Patriot League Charter In a fiscally and otherwise 
responsible manner, the Athletics Department will be a beacon 
of excellence and enthusiasm in the American University com- 
munity. 
Sports Center 

The Sports Center complex serves as home to the American 
University athletics program. The university features a nine- 
teen-sport NCAA Division I program which competes in the Pa- 
triot League (Army, Bucknell, Colgate, Holy Cross, Lafayette, 
Lehigh, and Navy). The university offers women's basketball, 
cross country, field hockey, indoor and outdoor track and field, 
lacrosse, soccer, swiinming and diving, tennis, and volleyball, 
and men's basketball, cross country, golf, indoor and outdoor 
track and field, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, and wres- 
tling. 

American University students may attend Eagles 
home-ticketed sporting events free of charge by picking up tick- 
ets in advance of the game. With proper AU identification, stu- 
dents receive two tickets to each event. 

Up-to-the-minute infonnarion on AU athletics is available at 
the Eagles' official Web site at www.aueagles.com or by calling 
the AU Sports Hotline at 202-885-DUNK (x3865). 

Other special ftinctions and major entertainment events occur 
throughout the year in Bender Arena. Tickets for both on- and 
oft-campus events can be purchased at the Ticketmaster outlet 
located in the lobby of the arena. For all ticket information, call 
202-885-FANS (x3267). 
Athletics and Recreation Facilities 

American University's Sports Center houses Bender Arena, 
Reeves Aquatic Center, the William I Jacobs Fimess Center, and 
Athletics and Recreation Department offices. The center in- 
cludes four ftill-size basketball/volleyball courts, a 25-yard 
swimming pool, and a warm-up pool. Outdoor facilities include 
the Reeves soccer/lacrosse field, Greenberg running track. 
Reeves tennis courts, Jacobs intramural field and. two basket- 
ball courts behind the Sports Center The William I Jacobs recre- 
ational complex, which opened in Fall 2005. includes an 



Introduction 9 



astroturf field hockey surface, a Softball field, state-of-the-art 
scoreboard, and two outdoor sand volleyball courts. 

The Jacobs Fitness Center is the central campus facility, pro- 
viding a supportive environment for fitness and health for all 
members of the AU community. Located off the lobby of the 
Sports Center, the Fitness Center is a state-of-the- art fitness area 
with a wide range of cardio equipment, strength machines, and 
weights. In addition, there are smaller fitness centers in each of 
the residence hall complexes and at the Tenley campus. The Fit- 
ness Center also provides a variety of services for additional fees 
including group exercise classes, yoga, personal training, fitaess 
assessments, and locker rentals. The center is staffed with 
CPR-certified professionals who are dedicated to health and 
wellness, trained in the use of the equipment, and ready to assist 
with an exercise program to achieve personal health goals. 

Students with a valid AU ID who have registered for classes 
are eligible to use the Fitness Center Memberships for the Fit- 
ness Center are also available at discounted fees for faculty, 
staff, and alumni. 

Hours of operation vary according to the academic calendar 
and scheduled university events in the arena. Specific informa- 
tion on the hours of operation is available on the web at 
www.american.edu/jacobsfitness or by calling the Info Line at 
202-885-6267. 

Intramural and Club Sports 

The Intramural Sports Program is an exciting and fiin com- 
plement to a student's academic, cultural, and social education. 
The program offers a wide range of sports including basketball, 
flag football, soccer, Softball, racquetball, golf swimming, vol- 
leyball, and tennis. Different leagues are conducted in these 
sports for men, women, co-recreational groups, and varying 
skill levels. Involvement in intramurals is a wonderful opportu- 
nity for students to make new acquaintances, develop friend- 
ships and enjoy the benefits of exercise and physical activity. An 
Intramural Sports Program brochure listing all the rules and reg- 
ulations of the program, as well as deadlines for signing up for 
various sports, may be obtained from the Intramural Office in 
the Sports Center lower level. Room G-03, 202-885-3050. 

Club Sports are student run and organized teams. They com- 
pete against colleges and universities around the country in the 
following areas: ballroom dance, crew, cycling, fencing, men's 
and women's ice hockey, men's and women's lacrosse, roller 
hockey, men's and women's rugby, women's soccer, women's 
Softball, and men's and women's ultimate frisbee. Programs re- 
ceive flinding from the Department of Athletics, supervised by 
the recreational sports office. 

On-Campus Services 

Dining Services and Stores 

The Terrace Dining Room (TDR), Marketplace, and Tavern 
are located in Mary Graydon Center. There is also a contract din- 
ing facility on the Tenley Campus. The Eagle's Nest carries 
food, magazines, newspapers, and toiletry items. Other stores 



and services in the Butler Pavilion include a bank, mailbox ser- 
vice/copy center, hair salon, cafe, and fast-food restaurant. 

The campus bookstore, located on the second and third floors 
of the Butler Pavilion, carries all required textbooks, a large se- 
lection of other books, all necessary supplies, stationery, Ameri- 
can University sportswear, and other items. 
Child Development Center 

American University's Child Development Center, located 
on campus, is a licensed and NAECP-accredited preschool for 
children 2>< to 5 years old. Highly-qualified teachers, supported 
by trained work-study students, provide a developmentally ap- 
propriate program of active learning in the areas of physical, so- 
cial, emotional, and intellectual development. Children of 
students, faculty, and staff may be enrolled in this stimulating 
and nurturing fiill-day program. In addition, the center offers 
students from many disciplines a place to intem and observe, 
create, and test theories involving children. For more informa- 
tion on the Child Development Center, call 202-885-3330. 

Parking and Trafflc 

Parking at American University is by permit or meter only, 
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Designated re- 
stricted lots and the Tenley Campus lots are enforced 24 hours a 
day, seven days a week. Visitors may purchase a guest permit 
from the Transportation Services office. 

All faculty, staff, and students must register their vehicles in 
the Transportation Services office by the end of the first day of 
classes of each semester. Vehicles brought to the university dur- 
ing the semester must be registered immediately. Students may 
not register a vehicle that is not registered in their family name. 
Freshmen and Washington Semester students arc not permitted 
to have vehicles on campus or to park in Advisory Neighbor- 
hood Commissions 3D and 3E. 

Special access parking spaces are available around campus. 
Vehicles parked in these spaces must display valid handicap or 
disability license plates or permits. Temporary AU disability 
permits may be obtained from the Transportation Services of- 
fice. A physician's certification is required. 

For more information call 202-885-31 10. 

Shuttle Services 

American University encourages the use of the Washington, 
D.C. subway and bus system, Mefrorail and Metrobus. A free 
shuttle service for students, faculty, staff, and visitors is avail- 
able to and from the TcnIeytown/AU Metrorail station, Tenley 
Campus, Park Bethesda, and the Washington College of Law. 
Access for persons with disabilities is available. A valid AU ID 
card or Shuttle Guest Pass is required for all riders. Hours of op- 
eration are Monday through Thursday, 7:00 a.m. to 12:30 a.m.; 
Friday, 7:00 a.m. to 2:30 a.m.; Saairday, 8:00 a.m. to 2:30 a.m.; 
and Sunday, 8:00 a.m. to 1 :00 a.m. 

For a shuttle schedule or more information, call 202-885-3302 
or go to: 
www.american.edu/finance/transportarionyshuttle.cfrn . 



10 Introduction 



Accreditation 

American University is accredited by the Middle States 
Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Schools, 3624 Market Street, Philadelphia, 
PA 19104, 267-284-5000. The Middle States Commission on 
Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recog- 
nized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for 
Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). American University 
is recognized as church-related by the University Senate of the 
United Methodist Church. A number of programs are individu- 
ally accredited by, or are members of, professional organiza- 
tions: 

• The Department of Chemistry at American University is 
accredited by the American Chemical Society (ACS), a 
specialized accrediting agency recognized by U.S. 
Department of Education. 

• The School of Education, Teaching, and Health at 
American University is accredited by the National Council 
for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), a 
specialized accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. 
Department of Education and the Council for Higher 
Education Accreditation. The School of Education, 
Teaching and Health, is also accredited by the National 
Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and 
Certification (NASDTEC), a specialized accrediting 
agency recognized by the Council for Higher Education 
Accreditation (both elementary and secondary). 

• The music program of the Department of Performing Arts 
at American University is an accredited institutional 
member of the National Association of Schools of Music, a 
specialized accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. 
Department of Education and the Council for Higher 
Education Accreditation. 

• Since 1 972, the doctoral program in clinical psychology of 
the Department of Psychology at American University has 
been accredited by the American Psychological 
Association, a specialized accrediting agency recognized 



by the U.S. Department of Education and the Council for 
Higher Education Accreditation. 

> The School of Communication at American University is 
accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in 
Journalism and Mass Communication, a specialized 
accrediting agency recognized by the Council for Higher 
Education Accreditation. 

> The Kogod School of Business at American University is 
accredited by AACSB International, the Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, a specialized 
accrediting agency recognized by the Council for Higher 
Education Accreditation. 

• The School of International Service at American 
University is a member of the Association of Professional 
Schools of International Relations. 

> The School of Public Affairs at American University is 
accredited by the Commission on Peer Review and 
Accreditation of the National Association of Schools of 
Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA), a 
specialized accrediting agency recognized by the Council 
for Higher Education Accreditation, and authorized to 
accredit master/masters degrees in public affairs and 
administration. American University's School of Public 
Affairs is a member of the Association for Public Policy 
Analysis and Management ( APPAM) and the Academy of 
Criminal Justice Sciences. 

' The Washington College of Law at American University is 
approved by the American Bar Association (ABA) 
through ABA's Section of Legal Education and 
Admissions to the Bar, a specialized accrediting agency 
recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. 
American University's Washington College of Law is a 
member of the Association of American Law Schools. The 
law school also meets the requirements for preparation for 
the bar in all states and carries the certification for the 
United States District Court for the District of Columbia 
and the New York State Department of Education. 



College of Arts and Sciences 
Kogod School of Business 
School of Communication 
School of International Service 
School of Public Affairs 
Washington College of Law 



Degrees Conferred 2007-2008 

Bachelor's Master's Doctorate J.D. 



LLM. 



371 


399 


45 


246 


156 




209 


149 




362 


354 


5 


294 


198 


7 



475 



133 



Total 

815 

402 

358 

721 

499 

609 



University Total 



;,482 



1.256 



58 



475 



133 



3,404 



In 2007-2008, the graduation rate for undergraduate students who entered American University as full-time freshmen in 
fall 2003 was 75.8 percent. 



Introduction 1 1 



Undergraduate Programs 

Majors 

American Studies (B.A.) 

Anthropology (B.A.) 

Art History (B.A.) 

Audio Production (B.A.) 

Audio Technology (B.S.) 

Biochemistry (B.S.) 

Biology (B.S.) 

Business Administration (B.S. B.A.) 

Business, Language & Culture Studies (B.S.) 

Business and Music (B.S.) 

Chemistry (B.S.) 

Communication: Communication Studies (B.A.) 

Communication: Journalism (B.A.) 

Communication: Public Communication (B.A.) 

Communication: Film and Media Arts (B.A.) 

Computer Science (B.S.) 

Economics (B.A., B.S.) 

Elementary Education (B.A.) 

Environmental Studies (B.A.) 

Fine Arts (B.RA.) 

Foreign Language and Communication Media (B.A.) 

French Studies (B.A.) 

German Studies (B.A.) 

Graphic Design (B.A.) 

Health Promotion (B.S.) 

History (B.A.) 

Interdisciplinary Studies (B.A., B.S.) 

Interdisciplinary Studies: Commimication, Legal 
Institutions, Economics, and Government (B.A.) 

International Studies (B.A.) 

Jewish Studies (B.A.) 

Justice (B.A.) 

Language and Area Studies: 

French/Europe (B.A.) Russian/ Area Studies (B.A.) 
German/Europe (B.A.) Spanish/Latin America (B.A.) 

Law and Society (B.A.) 

Liberal Studies (B.A.) 

Literature (B.A.) 

Marine Science (B.S.) 

Mathematics (B.S.) 

Mathematics, Applied (B.S.) 

Music (B.A.) 

Performing Arts: Musical Theater (B.A.) 

Performing Arts: Theater (B.A.) 

Philosophy (B.A.) 

Physics (B.S.) 

Political Science (B.A.) 

Psychology (B.A.) 

Religious Studies (B.A.) 

Russian Studies (B.A.) 

Secondary Education (second major only) 

Sociology (B.A.) 

Spanish Studies (B.A.) 

Statistics (B.S.) 

Studio Art (B.A.) 

Women's and Gender Studies (B.A.) 



Minors 

American Studies 

Anthropology 

Anthropology, Applied 

Arab Studies 

Arabic 

Art History 

Audio Technology 

Biochemistry 

Biology 

Business Administration 

Chemistry 

Chinese 

Communication 

Computer Science 

Dance 

Economics 

Education Studies 

Environmental Science 

Finance 

French Language 

German Language 

Graphic Design 

Health Promotion 

History 

Information Systems and Technology 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

International Business 

Intemational Studies 

Israel Studies 

Japanese Language 

Jewish Studies 

Justice 

Language and Area Studies: 

French/Europe Japanese/Asia 
German/Europe Russian/ Area Studies 
Italian/Europe Spanish/Latin America 

Literature 

Literature: Cinema Studies 

Marketing 

Mathematics 

Multi-Ethnic Studies 

Music 

North American Studies 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Physics, Applied 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Public Administration and Policy 

Quantitative Methods 

Real Estate 

Religion 

Russian Language 

Russian Studies 

Sociology 

Spanish Language 

Special Education 

Statistics 

Studio Art 

Theater 

Women's and Gender Studies 



12 Introducrion 

Graduate Programs 

Doctoral 

Anthropology (Ph.D.) 

Economics (Ph.D.) 

History (Ph.D.) 

International Relations (Ph.D.) 

Juridical Science (S.J.D.) 

Justice, Law and Society (Ph.D.) 

Political Science (Ph.D.) 

Psychology (Ph.D.) 

Public Administration (Ph.D.) 

Master's 

Accoimting (M.S.) 

Applied Science (M.S.) 

Art History (M.A.) 

Biology (M.A.. M.S.) 

Business Administration (M.B.A.) 

Chemistry (M.S.) 

Communication: Journalism and Public Affairs (M.A.) 

Communication: Producing for Film and Video (M.A.) 

Communication: Public Communication (M.A.) 

Computer Science (M.S.) 

Creative Writing (M.F.A.) 

Ciuxiculum and Instruction (M.Ed) 

Development Management (M.S.) 

Economics (M.A.) 

Environmental Science (M.S.) 

Ethics, Peace, and Global Affairs (M.A.) 

Fihn and Electronic Media (M.F.A.) 

Film and Video (M.A.) 

Finance (M.S.) 

Finance and Real Estate (M.S.) 

Global Environmental Policy (M.A.) 

Health Promotion Management (M.S.) 

History (M.A.) 



International Affairs (M.A.) 
tracks: 

Comparative and Regional Studies 

International Economic Policy 

International Politics 

Natural Resources and Sustainable Development 

United Stales Foreign Policy 
International Communication (M.A.) 
International Development (M.A.) 
International Legal Studies (LL.M.) 
International Media (M.A.) 
International Peace and Conflict Resolution (M.A.) 
International Service (M.I.S.) 
Intemational Training and Education (M.A.) 
Justice, Law and Society (M.S.) 
Law (J.D.) 

Law and Government (LL.M.) 
Literature (M.A.) 
Mathematics (M.A.) 
Organization Development (M.S.O.D.) 
Performing Arts: Arts Management (M.A.) 
Philosophy (M.A.) 
Political Science (M.A.) 
Psychology (M.A.) 
Public Administration (M.P.A.) 

Public Administration: Key Executive Leadership (M.P.A.) 
Public Anthropology (M.A.) 
Public Policy (M.RP) 
Sociology (M.A.) 

Spanish: Latin American Studies (M.A.) 
Special Education: Leaming Disabilities (M.A.) 
Statistics (M.S.) 
Studio Art (M.F.A.) 
Taxation (M.S.) 
Teaching (M.A.T.) 
tracks: 

Elementary Education 

Secondary Education 

English for Speakers of Other Languages 

Intemational Training and Development 
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (M.A.) 



Introduction 13 



Certificate Programs 



Undergraduate Certificates 

Advanced Leadership Studies (SPA students) 

Arab Studies 

Asian Studies 

European Studies 

International Affairs 

Multi-Ethnic Studies 

Public Anthropology 

Statistics, Applied 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) 

Translation: French, German, Russian, or Spanish 

Women, Policy, and Political Leadership 

Graduate Certificates 

Arts Management 
Asian Studies 
Business: 

Advanced Tax Concepts 

Business Analysis for IT Consulting 

Business Essentials for Managers 

Entrepreneurship 

Financial Planning and Wealth Management 

Intemational Business 

IT Management in Global Time 

Leadership Essentials for Professionals 

Marketing Management 

Professional Health Management 

Real Estate Finance 

Tax 
Computer Science 
Cross-Cultural Communication 
Environmental Assessment 
European Studies 
Gender Analysis in Economics 
Global Information Technology 



Intemational Development Management 

Intemational Economic Relations 

Microeconomics, Applied 

Nonprofit Management 

Nutrition Education 

North American Studies 

Organization Development, Fundamentals and Advanced 

Leadership for Organizational Change 

Peacebuilding 

Postbaccalaureate Premedical 

Professional Development: 

Comparative and Regional Studies 

Global Environmental Policy 

Intemational Communication 

Intemational Development 

Intemational Economic Policy 

Intemational Peace and Conflict Resolution 

Intemational Politics 

United States Foreign Policy 
Public Anthropology 
Public Financial Management 
Public Management 
Public Policy Analysis 
Social Research 
Statistics, Applied 

Teaching: Early Childhood Education 
Teaching: Elementary 

Teaching: English for Speakers of Other Languages 
Teaching: Secondary 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) 
The Americas 

Translation: French, Russian, or Spanish 
Women, Policy, and Political Leadership 



14 Introduction 




Admission Requirements 

• Freshman and Transfer Students 

• Graduate Students 

• Nondegree Students 

• International Students 



Undergraduate Study 

To request application forms or for more information: 
phone: 202-885-6000 e-mail: admissions@american.edu 
Applicants may use the paper or online version of the Common 
Application, the AU paper application, or AU online application 
at: www.american.edu/admissions . 

Applicants are responsible for requesting that leteres of rec- 
oinmendation and official transcripts and test scores be sent di- 
rectly to the Admissions Office. American University's SAT 
and TOEFL code is 5007, and the ACT code is 0648. 

International applicants should refer to the international sm- 
dent guide Encounter the World for additional instructions. 
American University requires all applicants whose first lan- 
guage is not English, regardless of citizenship, to demonstrate 
English-language proficiency. For more information, see Eng- 
lish Language Requirements. 

Freshman Admission Requirements 

To be considered for admission, applicants should: 

• Have graduated from a secondary school with at least 16 
academic units, including at least four units in English, 
three units in college preparatory mathematics (including 
the equivalent of two units in algebra and one unit of 
geometry), two units in foreign language(s), two units in lab 
science, and two units in social sciences. 

Applicants who hold General Education Diplomas (GEDs) 
may be admitted on the basis of satisfactory performance on 
SAT, ACT, and other such tests and transcripts. 

• Have a minimum academic average of above C. 

• Submit the results of either the SAT Reasoning test or the 
ACT with writing. 

Also recommended are the SAT Subject Mathematics Level 
II test (a score of 650 in Math II will fulfill the University 
Mathematics Requirement) and Foreign Language SAT 
Subject test for applicants who plan to continue the study of a 
foreign language begun in secondan,' school. 



Transfer Admission Requirements 

Students who wish to be considered for transfer admission 
must be in good academic and social standing at the school pre- 
viously attended. All applicants with a cumulative grade point 
average of at least 2.00 on a 4.00 scale irom all schools attended 
(at AG-rated regionally accredited institutions) will be consid- 
ered. However, to be considered competitive for admission, ap- 
plicants need a minimum grade point average of 2.50. 

Applicants to individual schools should have maintained a 
cumulative minimum grade point average (on a 4.00 scale) fi^om 
all schools attended as follows: 

Kogod School of Business 2.50 

School of Communication 2.50 

School of International Service 3.00 

School of Educafion, Teaching, and Health (College of 

Arts and Sciences) 2.70 

School of Public Affairs 2.50 

Transfer applicants must request each collegiate institution 

previously attended to send an official transcript of all work 

completed directly to the Admissions Office. Attendance at all 

institutions must be reported whether or not credit was earned 

and whether or not transfer credit is desired. Failure to report all 

previous academic work will be considered sufficient cause for 

rejection of an application or for dismissal from the university. 

Transfer applicants with fewer than 24 credit hours com- 
pleted at the time of application should also submit the second- 
ary school record and standardized test scores. 

Deadlines for Admissions Applications 

U.S. Freshman Admissions AppUcation Deadlines 

• Fall Semester Early Decision: November 1 5 

• Fall Semester Regular Decision: January 15 

• Spring Semester: December I 

• Summer Semester: April 1 

U.S. Transfer Student Admission Application Deadlines 

• Fall Semester: March 1 to be considered for 

scholarships/financial aid 

• Fall Semester: July 1 

• Spring Semester: November 1 

• Suinmer Semester: April 1 



15 



16 Admission Requirements 



International Freshman Admission Application Deadlines 

• Fall Semester Early Decision Freshmen: November 15 

• Fall Semester Regular Decision: January 15 

• Spring Semester: September 1 

International Transfer Admission Application Deadlines 

• Fall Semester: May 1 

• Spring Semester: September 1 

Due to visa regulations, international students may have restric- 
tions on applying for admission for the summer temi. For more 
information, contact International Student & Scholar Services 
(ISSS) at 202-885-3350. 

University Honors Program Admission 

Incoming freshmen are admitted by invitation to the Univer- 
sity Honors Program, there is no separate application to apply. 
The top applicants for admission to the university will be con- 
sidered for the program and will be notified of this decision 
along with their admission letter Admission to the program is 
highly competitive, with consideration of the student's grade 
point average, the strength of the high school academic pro- 
gram, and standardized test scores as the most important factors 
in the selection process. Freshman and sophomores who were 
not invited as freshman but who demonstrate academic excel- 
lence, such as a cumulative grade point average of 3.60 or 
higher, rigorous coursework, innovative research, etc., may 
nominate themselves for admission to the program after com- 
pleting two fiill time academic semesters at American Univer- 
sity. To begin the nomination process, students should contact 
the University Honors Center at honors(5iamerican.edu. 

Notice of Admission 

General admission treshman applicants whose applications 
and supporting documents have been received by the Admis- 
sions Office by Febmary I are notified of the decision on their 
applications by April 1. 

Early decision applicants are notified of the decision by De- 
cember 3 1 : at that time early decision applicants may be admit- 
ted, denied admission, or deferred until the general admission 
date of April 1. 

Transfer applicants are notified of decisions as they are made. 

Full-time undergraduates are required to pay a nonreflmdable 
tuition deposit to reserve a place in the class. 

Complete detailed instructions for replying to the admission 
offer are provided with the notice of acceptance. 
Early Admission 

American University offers the opportunity for admission a 
year earlier than normal to freshman applicants whose ability, 
academic achievement, and general maturity indicate that they 
are ready to begin collegiate work. 

Applicants are considered on their own merit. However, the 
major factors important to evaluation are: 

• the secondary school record, with special reference to 
grades achieved and the pattem of courses taken; 

• perfomiance on the Scholastic Assessment Test I ( SAT I ) or 
the American College Test (ACT); 



• the recommendation of the secondary school principal or 
counselor and two teacher recommendations; 

• a letter from the applicant stating the reasons for seeking 
eariy admission; and 

• possibly, an interview with a screening committee. 
Early Decision 

Freshman applicants whose first choice is American Univer- 
sity are encouraged to apply as early decision candidates. Stu- 
dents admitted under the early decision plan learn of their 
admission by December 3 1 and receive first consideration for 
scholarships, financial aid, housing, and registration. The uni- 
versity, in turn, is assured that these smdents will enroll if admit- 
ted. 

The deadline for applying for early decision is November 1 5, 
at which time all documents, including the S45 application fee, 
must be on file with the Admissions Office. Early decision ap- 
plicants may initiate applications to other schools before notifi- 
cation, but if they are admitted to American University as eariy 
decision candidates, they must submit a tuition prepayment by 
February 1 and withdraw all applications to other colleges and 
universities. 

Early decision applicants are evaluated by the same criteria 
as all other fi-eshman applicants. They may be admitted to the 
university in December, denied admission, or have their appli- 
cation deferred until the general admission reply date of April 1 . 
Students deferred until April are released from the commitment 
to attend if admitted. 
Learning Services Program 

American University offers a structured program for entering 
freshmen with learning disabilities who are seeking additional 
support. Students interested in the Learning Services Program 
must identity themselves in the regular admissions process and 
submit a supplementary application to the program at the time 
they apply to the university. Further information is available 
from the Academic Support Center at 202-885-3360 or 
ascfa'american.edu . 

Admission from Nondegree Status 

Students wishing to transfer fi^om nondegree status at Ameri- 
can University to undergraduate degree status must submit a for- 
mal application for admission to the Admissions Office. If a 
student is accepted into an undergraduate degree program, a 
ma.ximum of 30 credit hours may be transferred fi-om nondegree 
status to the degree program. 

Admission for Part-time Study 

An undergraduate student enrolled in fewer than 12 credit 
hours is considered a part-time student. Part-time degree appli- 
cants are required to meet the same standards for admission as 
full-time freshman or fransfer applicants. 

Applicants considering part-time study in a degree program 
are cautioned that they may be unable to complete the necessary 
course work for some degree programs by attending evening 
classes only. Before applying they should consult widi the de- 



Admission Requirements 17 



partment of their proposed major to ascertain whether the re- 
quired courses will be available to them. 

Readmission 

An undergraduate student whose studies at the university are 
interrupted for any reason for a period of one semester (exclud- 
ing the summer sessions) must submit a formal application for 
readmission and a reapplication fee to the Admissions Office at 
least two months before the beginning of the semester or sum- 
mer session for which the student wishes to be readmitted, un- 
less written permission to study at another collegiate institution 
was secured in advance or the student has been granted an offi- 
cial leave of absence. 

Students who were in good standing when they left the uni- 
versity and who have maintained a satisfactory grade point aver- 
age at another school are virtually assured readmission. It is to a 
student's advantage to apply for readmission as early as possible 
so that he or she may register during the advance registration pe- 
riod. 

A student who is readmitted is subject to the academic re- 
quirements and regulations in effect at the time of readmission. 

Graduate Study 

Application for graduate suidy is made directly to the school 
or department offering the degree program and is self-managed. 
As graduate programs are highly individualized, applicants are 
encouraged to schedule an appointment with an academic advi- 
sor in the appropriate department. 

Applicants are responsible for requesting that official tran- 
scripts and test scores be sent directly from the issuing institu- 
tions to the appropriate graduate admissions office. Attendance 
at all institutions must be reported whether or not credit was 
earned. Failure to report all previous academic work (under- 
graduate and graduate) will be considered sufficient cause for 
rejection of an application or for dismissal fi^om the university. 

International applicants should refer to International Student 
Information for additional instructions. American University re- 
quires all applicants whose first language is not English, regard- 
less of citizenship, to demonstrate English-language 
proficiency. For more information, see English Language Re- 
quirements 
Admission Requirements 

The minimum university admission requirements for gradu- 
ate study are outlined below. Please refer to the appropriate col- 
lege, school, and department program requirements for 
additional requirements. 

• A bachelor's degree earned at an accredited college or 
university. 

• At least a 3.00 cumulative grade point average (on a 4.00 
scale) in the undergraduate program, calculated on the last 
60 credit hours of course work completed. 

• A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 
scale) in all relevant graduate work for which a grade has 
been awarded. 



An applicant for graduate study may be admitted without ref- 
erence to the undergraduate average if the applicant has main- 
tained either a 3.30 (on a 4 00 scale) cumulative grade point 
average in a master's degree program completed at an accred- 
ited institution, or a 3.50 (on a 4.00 scale) cumulati\e grade 
point average in the last 1 2 credit hours of a master's or doctoral 
degree program still in progress at such an institution at the time 
the application is evaluated, or in graduate work taken in 
nondegree status at American University and applicable to the 
degree program which is being applied for 

An applicant for graduate study may be admitted without a 
bachelor's degree earned at an accredited college or university 
or without reference to the undergraduate average provided that 
he or she is a midcareer person from government or the private 
sector who has not attended school flill-time for at least eight 
years and is applying for admission to a professional master's 
degree program. This exception must be justified by an evalua- 
tion of the applicant's work performance and his or her organi- 
zation's recommendation. 
Provisional Standing 

Each college, school, or department of the university may ad- 
mit to provisional standing a limited number of students who do 
not meet the minimum standards of either the university or the 
teaching unit. By the end of one fiill semester of full-time study 
or after the first 9 to 1 2 credit hours of part-time study, the stu- 
dent will be evaluated by the college, school, or department. 
Continuation in the graduate program will be permitted on fa- 
vorable appraisal of the student's performance. 

The provisional admission stams of a graduate student who 
does not give satisfactory evidence of capability will be with- 
drawn. This constitutes dismissal of the student. 
Admission from Nondegree Status 

Saidents wishing to transfer fi-om nondegree status at Ameri- 
can University to graduate degree status must submit a fonnal 
application for admission. If a student is accepted into a graduate 
degree program, up to 12 credit hours of graduate-level course 
work completed in nondegree status may be applied to a gradu- 
ate degree program, or up to 2 1 credit hours earned in a com- 
pleted graduate certificate program. 
Readmission 

After expiration of the time limit for completion of a graduate 
degree program, readmission may be granted once for a period 
of three years ( less any time given in previous extensions of can- 
didacy), subject to the requirements of the particular degree in 
effect at the time of readmission, and may involve taking addi- 
tional courses or other work or both. When a student is readmit- 
ted under these circimistances, the length of time that the student 
will be given to complete degree requirements and any addi- 
tional courses, examinations, or other requirements which are 
deemed necessary by the teaching unit will be specified. Stu- 
dents applying for graduate readmission must pay a fee. 



1 8 Admission Requirements 



Nondegree Study 

A student who does not wish or is not ready to pursue a degree 
program but desires to take credit courses may be quahfied to 
enroll as a nondegree student. Nondegree students may register 
for any university course for which they have the necessary aca- 
demic background and qualifications. Many students begin their 
studies in nondegree status and apply the credit they have earned 
toward a degree program in one of the schools or colleges of the 
university. Nondegree students begin registration with the 
nondegree advisor in the appropriate school or college. 

Undergraduate-level courses are open to high school gradu- 
ates; students in good standing at other accredited colleges and 
universities; students with an undergraduate degree; and 
high-school students who have a B average and the recommen- 
dation of their high school counselor or principal. 

Graduate-level courses are open to students who have com- 
pleted a bachelor's degree. 

The following students ordinarily may not register in 
nondegree status: 

• Students currently enrolled as undergraduate or graduate 
degree students in any of the member institutions of the 
Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan 
Area 

• American University students who have not completed 
their degree programs 

• Students who have been dismissed from American 
University or another college or university within the 
previous twelve months 

International Student Admission 

The following regulations apply to all students who are 
not citizens or "permanent residents" of the United States of 
America. 

All international students applying for admission must sub- 
mit the appropriate documents well in advance to undergraduate 
admissions or to the graduate office of the school or college to 
which they are applying. Photocopied or faxed documents are 
not accepted for evaluation purposes. Transcripts for interna- 
tional applicants must be submitted for all secondary schools at- 
tended. Documents must be in the language of instruction of the 
issuing school and must be accompanied by an official English 
translation. 

Visa Requirements 

Students in nonimmigrant F- 1 or J- 1 status are required by 
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) regulations 
to enroll for and maintain a fiill-time course load during the fall 
and spring semesters. If the student's first term is a summer ses- 
sion, the fiill-time course load requirement will apply for that 
summer. It is the individual student's responsibility to comply 
with fNS regulations. 

To meet the fNS fiill-time course load requirements at Ameri- 
can University each semester, undergraduate students are re- 



quired to register for a minimum of 1 2 credit hours, graduate 
students for a minimum of 9 credit hours, and law students in the 
master's program for a minimum of 8 credit hours. Any change 
in registration which results in a course load below these mini- 
mum requirements must be authorized by International Smdent 
& Scholar Services (ISSS) in consultation with the smdent's ac- 
ademic advisor. 

Students in F-1 or J-1 status who fail to meet these require- 
ments are considered by FNS to be "out-of-status" and lose their 
eligibility for all immigration benefits including on-campus em- 
ployment and practical trainmg and are subject to deportation. 

All students in F-1 nonimmigrant status are required to at- 
tend, initially, the educational institution which issued the Cer- 
tificate of Eligibility (1-20) used to obtain the F-1 status. 

Students in F-1 or J-1 status are reminded that a change of 
school from one U.S. educational institution to another or a 
change of program within the same educational institution must 
be made according to INS regulations. At American University 
such changes are processed through International Student & 
Scholar Services (ISSS), Butler Pavilion 410. 

Students in Exchange Visitor (J- 1 ) status requesting a transfer 
to American University should consult with ISSS before regis- 
tering for classes. Transfer from one exchange visitor program 
to another requires a release from the previous program sponsor 
and/or the approval of the INS. It is advisable that all students 
entering the university in J- 1 stams at the time of admission con- 
sult with ISSS before registering for classes. 

Questions concerning FNS regulations should be directed to 
International Student & Scholar Services (ISSS), Butler Pavil- 
ion 410; telephone 202-885-3350; fax 202-885-3354. Regular 
office hours are Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. 

English Language Requirements 

American University generally requires all students whose 
first language is not English, regardless of citizenship, to take 
one of the following exams and achieve the indicated scores to 
demonstrate English-language proficiency: Graduate students 
should check specific admission requirements for their degree 
program for required test scores. 

• TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language): score 550 
or higher on the paper-based test or 2 1 3 or higher on the 
computer-based test or 80 or higher on the Internet-based 
test 

• SAT I: Reasoning Test (Verbal): score 530 or higher 

• SAT II: Subject Test-English Language Proficiency Test 
(ELPT): score 970 or higher 

• Intemational English Language Testing System (lELTS) 
score 6.5 or higher 

Examinarion results should be sent directly to the university. 
American University's SAT and TOEFL code is 5007. 



Tuition, Expenses, and 
Financial Aid 

• Tuition, Housing and Dining, and Fees 

• Undergraduate Financial Aid 

• Graduate Financial Aid 

• Veteran's Benefits 



Undergraduate students who register for 1 2 to 1 7 credit hours 
are assessed tuition at the fiill-time rate. Undergraduate students 
who register for fewer than 1 2 credit hours are assessed tuition 
based on the number of credit hours taken. Undergraduate sui- 
dents who register for more than 1 7 credit hours are charged the 
fiill-time hiition rate with an additional charge for each credit 
hour over 1 7. 

Graduate and nondegree students are assessed tuition per 
credit hour. 

Washington College of Law (WCL) students are assessed tu- 
ition on the same basis as undergraduates students. However, the 
WCL tuition rate differs from that of the rest of the university. 

The off-campus tuition rate differs from the rate for 
on-campus courses. Full-time undergraduate students, however, 
who register for courses both on and off campus are assessed tui- 
tion at the on-campus fijil-time rate. 

Given the probable continuation of current economic condi- 
tions, as well as the need to continue to accelerate the academic 
development of the university, it is reasonable to expect that tui- 
tion and fee increases will be required each year in the near fu- 
ture. 



Tuition 

Undergraduate Students 

Full-time (12-1 7 credit hours) SI 6, 408 

(Above 17 hours, $1,093 per additional credit hour) 
Part-time (per credit hour) 1 ,093 

Graduate Students 

Full- and part-time: (per credit hour) 1,178 

MBA Program 

12 or more credit hours (per semester) . . . . $14,113 

Fewer than 12 credit hours (per credit hour) . . . 1,079 

Law Students 

Full-time (12-17 credit hours) $19,326 

(Above 1 7 hours, S 1 ,43 1 per additional credit hour) 
Part-time (per credit hour) 1 ,43 1 

Nondegree Students 

Course level 100-400 (per credit hour) $1,093 

Course level 500 and above (per credit hour). . . 1,178 

Off-Campus Programs 

(per credit hour) 99 1 

Note: Auditors pay the same charges as students enrolled for 
credit and are subject to all applicable special fees. 



Non-AU Study Abroad Fee 

For all American University undergraduate students 
participating in non-AU study abroad programs via a 
Permit to Study Abroad. 

Fall or spring (per semester) $2,000 

Summer 1.000 



19 



20 Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



Housing 

Housing charges are per semester. 

Residence Hall Association Fee $14.00 

Main campus: Anderson, Hughes, Leonard, Letts, 
McDowell, and Nebraska Halls 

Single $5,412 

Double 4,315 

Tnple 3,153 

Centennial Hall 

Single 6,32 1 

Double 4,315 

Tenley campus: Congressional, Capital, and Federal 
Halls 

Single $5,412 

Single with bath 6,321 

Double 4,315 

Triple 3,153 

Meal Plan 

Meal plan charges are by contract per semester. 

Super Plan: Unlimited access to TDR $2,380 

200 Block: 200 TDR meals, $300 in EagleBuck$ 2,350 
1 50 Block: 1 50 TDR meals, $300 in EagleBuck$ 2. 1 50 
100 Block: 100 TDR meals, $300 in EagleBuck$ 1,600 
75 Block: 75 TDR meals, $300 in EagleBuck$. . 1,350 
All first and second-year resident suidents are required to be 
enrolled in a meal plan. Freshmen and first-year transfer 
students are required to be enrolled in at least the 1 50 Block 
Plan, but can also enroll in the 200 Block or Super meal 
plans. Second-year students are free to choose from any of 
the five meals plan otfered. 

Students can select a meal plan through their 
my.american.edu portal through August 15, or enroll in a 
meal plan or change their meal plan by visiting the Housing 
and Dining Programs office located on the first floor of 
Anderson Hall. New incoming students who do not select a 
meal plan will be automatically enrolled in the 1 50 block 
meal plan. 
For more information contact Housing and Dining I^ograms at 
202-885-3370 or go to: www.american.edu/ocl/housing 

Fees 

Note: The following fees are not included in tuition rates 
and are nonrefundable. 

Additional course and laboratory fees are also nonrefiindable 
and are listed in the Schedule of Classes at: 
www.american.edu/provost/registrar/schedule/class.cfin 

Registration 

Late Registration (effective the first day of the term) 

(per semester) $50 

Sports Center Fee (mandatory for all students) 

Full-time (per semester) 65 

Part-time (per semester) 30 

Technology Fee (mandatory for all students) 
Full-time (per semester) 120 



Part-time (per semester) 40 

Faculty/Staff Registration 

For employees of the university or their spouses or 

domestic partners registering under the tuition remission 

benefit, (per semester) 50 

Alumni Audit Program Registration 

(per semester) 100 

alumni audit late registration 10 

Student Accounts 

American Installment Plan (AIP) 

Program Fee (per year) $60 

Late fee for Installment Plan payments (per month) . 40 
All other late student account payments: 

Based on account balance, see Late Payment and 

Financial Restrictions 

Registration reinstatement 100 

Returned check 25 

(for all personal check and e-check occurances not honored 
by the bank) 

Health Insurance 

Note: These are the 2008-2009 rates, when available, 
2009-2010 rates will be at 

www.american.edu/ocl/healthcenter/About-Student-Health- 

Insurance-Plan.cfin . 

(per year) Sl,440 

For spring/summer 925 

For summer only 395 

Parking (per year) 

Student Commuter $936 

Part-time Student Commuter 358 

(undergraduate and law sUidents, fewer than 12 credit 
hours; graduate students, fewer than 9 credit hours; 
proof of part-time enrollment must be provided) 

Resident Student 936 

Student Motorcycle 358 

Faculty/Staff. 1,404 

Part-time Staff 708 

Staff Motorcycle 468 

Daily (or $1.50/hour) 12.00 

Graduate Students 

Graduate Student Association (mandatory for all fiill-time 
and part-time graduate students each semester) 

Full-time and part-time students (per semester) . $30 
Maintaining Matriculation (each semester). . . . 1,237 
SIS Program Fee (SIS master's students) 

Full-time (9 or more credit hours) 

(per semester) $750 

Part-time (6-8 credits hours) 

(per semester) $500 

Master's and Doctoral Comprehensive Examination 

Application 25 

Additional fee if in absentia 100 

Microfilmingof Master 's Thesis or Case Study . . . 45 
Microfilmingof Doctoral Dissertation 55 



Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 2 1 



Student ID Card Replacement 20 

Diploma Replacement 25 

Transcripts no charge 

Application fees vary by school, refer to individual school 
(CAS, KSB, SOC, SIS, SPA, WCL) web site for fee 
amount and application information. 

Undergraduate Students 

Student Confederation (mandatory for all undergraduate 
degree students each semester) 

Full-time students (per semester) $73.50 

Part-time students (per semester) 15 

Student ID Card Replacement 20 

Diploma Replacement Fee 25 

Transcripts no charge 

AEL (Assessment of Experiential Learning) Program 

Portfolio Assessment 250 

Posting Portfolio Credit on Academic Record 

(per credit hour/ maximum of 30 credits) 20 

Undergraduate Application/Readmission 60 

Law Students 

General Fee (per semester) 

Full-time $226 

Part-time 165 

Summer 36 

JD Application 70 

LLM Application 55 

Readmission 70 



Payment of Charges 

Students and student-authorized parents may make e-check 
payments through the web portal at my.american.edu . For more 
information, call Student Accounts at 202-885-3588. 
Personal check payments may be mailed to: 

American University 

Student Accounts 

P.O.Box 17539 

Baltimore, MD 21297-1539 

Other correspondence should be sent to: 

American University 

Student Accounts 

Asbury 300 

4400 Massachusetts Ave NW 

Washington, DC 20016-8073 

Payments may also be made in person at Student Accounts, 
Asbury 300, Monday through Friday. 9:30 am to 5:00 pm. 

Advance Registration/Direct Registration 

Students registering during advance registration with billing 
for the semester must pay the balance due on or before the due 
date as indicated on the bill. 

Students registering after the advance registration period (di- 
rect registration) must pay the balance due, less expected finan- 
cial aid, on the day they register. 

The American Guaranteed Tuition Single 
Payment Plan 

Available to incoming freshmen, this plan allows sUidents to 
stabilize tuition expenses by prepaying four years" tuition at the 
entering academic year rate. For more information call Minh 
Phung at 202-885-3559. 

American Installment Plan 

The American Installment Plan (AIP) is available to all 
ftill-time students. This plan covers the academic year and re- 
quires ten monthly payments from June 1 through March 1 , or 
twelve monthly payments from May 1 through April I. For 
more information, call Smdent Accounts at 202-885-3541. 

Late Payment and Financial Restrictions 

A finance charge may be assessed against a student's account 
for failure to meet the initial payment due date. The university 
will use a rate of 1 percent per month to compute the finance 
charge. The university figures the finance charge on the stu- 
dent's account by applying the 1 percent per month to the ad- 
justed balance of the student's account. 

In addition, failure to make payment when due will result in a 
financial "restriction" being placed on the student's account. The 
financial restriction will result in a "hold" being placed on the 
student's academic records, including transcript and diploma, 
and may also result in denial of advance registration and use of 
the payment plan or other credit privileges. 

If a student's courses are dropped due to nonpayment, a finan- 
cial restriction will be placed on his or her account. Restrictions 



22 Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



may be removed following the reinstatement of all courses orig- 
inally dropped. To reinstate courses, the student must make ar- 
rangements with the Collections Office and pay the account in 
full (including a $100 reinstatement fee and all associated fi- 
nance charges). The university reserves the right to delay clear- 
ance until a personal check or e-check clears a financial 
institution. 

A student who has once had a financial restriction placed 
against his or her account may be denied future advance regis- 
tration and payment plan privileges even though the student has 
been reinstated upon payment of the reinstatement fee. Re- 
peated failure to make payments when due may result in sever- 
ance of the student's relationship with the university. 

Students who incur financial obligations in the parking and 
traffic office, library, health center, or athletic department may 
be subject to late payment fees and financial restriction proce- 
dures. 

Students who fail to pay tuition or fees will be responsible for 
all costs of collection, including attorney's fees in the amount of 
15 percent of the balance due. 
Employer or Agency Tuition Assistance 

A student requesting employer or agency billing arrange- 
ments must ftunish Student Accounts with a valid contract or 
purchase order before the first day of classes. 

A contract or purchase order must contain the following in- 
formation: ( I ) student name and ID number, (2) term of atten- 
dance, (3) specific costs (and dollar amounts) to be paid 

by the sponsor (tuition, books, supplies, fees), (4) sponsor's 
billing address, and (5) contract or purchase order number or ac- 
counting appropriation, if applicable. Documentation submitted 
in lieu of a valid purchase order will not relieve a student of fi- 
nancial responsibility. 

In case of partial assistance, the student is required to pay the 
balance of his or her tuition costs at the time of registration in or- 
der to be considered registered. A student portion which quali- 
fies for one of the university payment plans is to be paid 
according to that plan. Failure to comply will result in the assess- 
ment of a I percent per month finance charge. (See Late Pay- 
ment and Financial Restrictions, above.) 

A student entitled to Campus Store credit may obtain a book 
charge form from Student Accounts. Purchases are permitted 
through the end of the Add/Drop period. 

Failure to submit vouchers in a timely manner may result in 
the assessment of late fees. A student is responsible for payment 
of any billed amounts which have been disallowed by his or her 
sponsor 

Employee Tuition Benefits 

Only full-time permanent faculty or staff" employees of 
American University are eligible for mition benefits. There is a 
nonrefundable $50 registration fee each semester, in addition to 
any special course fees, and mandatory sport, technology, and 
activity fees. Late registration fees are not applicable to faculty 
and staff using employee tuition benefits. 



The Tuition Remission Application is available online at 
my.american.edu . For more information, contact Human 
Resources at 202-885-2591 , 

Refunds and Cancellation of Charges 

Course Drops 

Students who reduce their course load (except for full-time 
undergraduates maintaining 12 credit hours or more) by drop- 
ping courses dunng the refund period of the semester will have 
the course mition cancellation calculated as of the date of the 
course drop. The student's account must show a credit balance 
before a refiuid will be processed. 

MBA modules and other courses on nonstandard schedules 
have different refund policies, percentages, and dates. In addi- 
tion, tuition and fee refund policies and deadlines for study 
abroad and other special programs may differ by program and 
location. Students should check with the appropriate office for 
specific guidelines. 

Discontinuing attendance in class or notifying an instructor 
does not constitute an official course drop. 
Withdrawal 

Students who completely withdraw from the university must 
submit the appropriate forms to the Office of the Registrar and 
Housing and Dining Programs. The amount of tuition to be can- 
celed will be calculated as of the date which the withdrawal 
forms are received in the Office of the Registrar and in accor- 
dance with the tuition cancellation schedule, below. If the with- 
drawal results in a refund, the request for refiand should be made 
in Student Accounts. The student's account must show a credit 
balance before a refund will be processed. 

Discontinuing attendance in classes or notifying instructors 
does not constitute an official withdrawal. Students who do not 
officially withdraw during the cancellation period by submitting 
the appropriate forms to the Office of the Registrar will be re- 
sponsible for payment of the fliU amount of the applicable tui- 
tion and fees. 
Tuition Cancellation Schedule 

The cancellation percentage is based on the date of the 

course drop or withdrawal: 

DropAVithdrawal through the second calendar week 

of classes 100% 

DropAVithdrawal through the third calendar week 

of classes 50% 

DropAVithdrawal through the fourth calendar week 

of classes 25% 

Withdrawal after the fourth calendar week 

of classes NONE 

Note: the calendar week for cancellation of tuition ends on Fri- 
day (adjustments are made for legal holidays that fall within the 
first four weeks of the semester). Students should check the Aca- 
demic Calendar for specific dates for each semester. 



Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 23 



Housing 

Requests for cancellation of room charges must be initiated 
by the student in writing to Housing and Dining Programs, An- 
derson Hall, by the withdrawal deadlines. The smdent must then 
request any applicable reflind through Student Accounts. 

The cancellation percentage is based on the date of 

withdrawal: 

Withdrawal through the first calendar week 

of the semester 75% 

Withdrawal in the second calendar week 

of the semester 50% 

Withdrawal in the third calendar week 

of the semester 25% 

Withdrawal after the third calendar week 

of the semester NONE 

Note: academic dismissal will result in a prorated charge for 
the weeks the student resided in university housing. 
Meal Plan 

Students will only be permitted to decrease or drop their meal 
plan during the first 15 days of the semester Meal plan adjust- 
ments are made on a daily prorated basis, not by the number of 
meals used. Requests for meal plan cancellations must be initi- 
ated in person at one of the Housing and Dining Programs loca- 
tions, Rockwood Building or Anderson Hall. Students then 
request any applicable refund through Student Accounts. Meal 
plan increases or sign-ups may be done at any time during the 
semester. 



Medical Withdrawal Policy 

No special waiver or refimd of tuition and fees is made when 
a student discontinues attending classes due to medical reasons. 
However, when a student is hospitalized on an emergency basis 
and is therefore unable to formally withdiaw from classes, the 
Registrar is authorized to process a retroactive withdrawal based 
on the last date that the student attended class. The student must 
present evidence of his or her hospitalization and the date of last 
attendance in class as verified by the instructor. Provided that the 
retroactive withdrawal date falls within the tuition cancellation 
period, the student's account will be adjusted accordingly. 

Tuition Refund Insurance 

The Tuition Reflind Plan can minimize fmancial loss in- 
curred in a medical withdrawal fi-om the university. This elective 
insurance plan provides coverage for tuition and housing 
charges. The plan extends and enhances the university's pub- 
lished refund policy. To participate, applications and fees must 
be returned before the first day of fall semester classes. For spe- 
cific benefits and limitations, premium, and other information, 
contact the student health insurance coordinator at 
202-885-3298. 



24 Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



Undergraduate Financial Aid 



American University awards financial aid to students based 
on a combination of demonstrated financial need, academic 
achievement, and the availability of funds. Once a student is ad- 
mitted to American University, the Financial Aid office will de- 
termine need and develop a financial aid award that includes 
fiinds fi-om the programs for which the student qualifies. In addi- 
tion to awarding fiands from American University, the university 
administers federal grant, loan, and work-study programs that 
may be included in the award. The financial aid award may in- 
clude a combination of an American University grant, federal 
grants, federally subsidized or unsubsidized loans and/or stu- 
dent employment. 

To receive consideration for financial aid, a student must be a 
United States citizen or eligible non-citizen in a degree program. 
New students should not wait to be admitted before filing the 
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). A financial 
aid application has no bearing on a student's admission applica- 
tion. 

For more information contact Financial Aid at 202-885-6 1 00 
or e-mail financialaid@american.edu. 
Financial Aid Options 

Grants 

Loans 

Altemarive Loans 

Scholarships 

Scholarships for International Students 

Private Scholarships 

ROTC 

Work-Study and Part-Time Employment 

Undergraduate Deadlines 

The FAFSA must be filed with the federal processor and the 
CSS/Financial Aid Profile must be submitted to the College 
Board by: 



Early Decision Freshmen 

Profile 

FAFSA 
Regular Decision Freshmen 
Transfer Students 
Current AU Students 



November 1 5 

February 15 

February 15 

March 1 

March 1 



Satisfactory Academic Progress 

Recipients of federal (Title IV) or institutional fiinds must 
maintain satisfactory academic progress toward their degree ob- 
jective to remain eligible for fmancial assistance. 
Minimum Standards 

• Full-time undergraduate financial aid recipients must 
maintain at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average and 
complete 24 credit hours per academic year. 

• Part-time undergraduate financial aid recipients must 
maintain at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average and 
complete four-fifths (80 percent) of all attempted credit 
hours. 

• All students must complete their academic program within 
150 percent of the normal time limit of that academic 
program as defined in the Academic Regulations. 

• Merit-based scholarship recipients may have different 
standards than those listed above. Please refer to the original 
award notification regarding merit award eligibility criteria. 

Special Considerations 

The following alternative grading options do not count to- 
ward the grade point average but do have an impact on students' 
satisfactory academic progress: 

• Withdrawals (W), Administrative Withdrawals (ZL), 
Audits (L), and Fails on Pass/Tail option (ZF) count as 
credits attempted but not earned, and have no impact on the 
grade point average. 

• Incompletes (I), Unreported Grades (N), and 
Administrari ve Failures (ZX ) count as credits attempted but 
not eamed, and are factored as a grade of F. 

• Pass (P) counts as credits attempted and eamed, but has no 
impact on the grade point average. 

• In Progress (IP) courses are excluded fi^om the calculation 
in the initial academic progress evaluation. Smdents have 
one calendar year ft'om the beginning of the course to 
successfiilly complete the course. If not completed in that 
time frame, the course counts as credits attempted but not 
eamed, and is factored as a grade of F. 

Frequency of Monitoring 

Each student's academic progress is measured once yearly in 
June, after spring grades are posted. Financial Aid will notify in 
writing smdents who are not making satisfactory progress. 
Academic Appeals 

All questions regarding the factual substance of academic re- 
cords and all requests for changes to those records must be made 
to the academic departments. The Academic Regulations de- 
scribe the petition process, Financial Aid has no authority to al- 
ter the academic record of a student. 



Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 25 



Re-E$tablishing Financial Aid Eligibility 

For a student who lias failed to maintain satisfactory aca- 
demic progress, eligibility for financial aid fijnds may be 
re-established in a number of ways. Among these are: the peti- 
tioning process described in the Academic Regulations; the 
changing of a grade; summer session attendance; and the com- 
pletion of incomplete or in progress courses. Please note that 
funds are not set aside for students in these circumstances. Even 
if the appeal is granted, fimds may not be available at that time. 

Financial Aid Appeals 

On occasion, a student may fail to maintain satisfactory prog- 
ress due to very serious circumstances that caused a major dis- 
ruption to that student's ability to successfully complete his or 
her course work. Students with mitigating circumstances 
must request reconsideration in writing to Financial Aid 
prior to July 1 . The request should include a comprehensive de- 
scription of the circumstances and documentation from at least 
two qualified persons who can verify the information. The Ap- 
peals Committee will review the appeal, make a recommenda- 
tion and send a letter of response to the student. 

Refund and Repayment Policy 

For American University's refund policies regarding tuition, 
housing and meal plan charges, see Refunds and Cancellation 
of Charges. 

The American University refiind policy does not apply to 
first-time American University students. A "first-time student" 
is defined in Federal regulations as any student who has not at- 
tended at least one class at American University, or who re- 
ceived a full refund for previous attendance at American 
University. 

Federal (Title IV) Financial Aid Recipients 
Return of Title IV Funds PoUcy 

The Financial Aid Office is required by federal statute to re- 
calculate federal fmancial aid eligibility for students who with- 
draw, drop out, are dismissed, or take a leave of absence prior to 
completing 60 percent of a payment period or term. The federal 
Title IV financial aid programs must be recalculated in these sit- 
uations. 

If a student leaves the institution prior to completing 60 per- 
cent of a payment period or term, the Financial Aid Office recal- 
culates eligibility for Title IV funds. Recalculation is based on 
the percentage of earned aid using the following Federal Return 
of Title IV fiinds formula: 

Percentage of payment period or term completed = the num- 
ber of days completed up to the withdrawal date divided by die 
total days in the payment period or term. (Any break of five days 
or more is not counted as part of the days in the term.) This per- 
centage is also the percentage of earned aid. 

Funds are retumed to the appropriate federal program based 
on the percentage of unearned aid using the following formula: 



Aid to be retumed = (100 percent of the aid that could be 

disbursed minus the percentage of earned aid) multiplied by 

the total amount of aid that could have been disbursed during 

the payment period or term. 

If a student earned less aid than was disbursed, the institution 
would be required to return a portion of the fiinds and the student 
would be required to return a portion of the fiinds. When Title IV 
fiinds are returned, the student borrower may owe a debit bal- 
ance to the institution. 

If a student earned more aid than was disbursed to him or her, 
the institution would owe the student a post-withdrawal dis- 
bursement which must be paid within 1 20 days of the student's 
withdrawal. The institution must return the amount of Title IV 
fiinds for which it is responsible no later than 30 days after the 
date of the determination of the date of the sUident's withdrawal. 

Refunds are allocated in the following order; 

• Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans 

• Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans 

• Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loans (other than PLUS 
Loans) 

• Subsidized Direct Stafford Loans 

• Federal Perkins Loans 

• Federal Parent (PLUS) Loans 

• Direct PLUS Loans 

• Federal Pell Grants for which a renim of funds is required 

• Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grants for which a 
return of fionds is required 

• Other assistance under Title IV for which a return of fiinds 
is required (e.g., LEAP) 

Scholarships 

Undergraduate University Scholarships 

The Admissions Committee makes all merit-based scholar- 
ship decisions and notifies students at the time they are admitted. 
Merit awards range from $3,000 to ftill tuition per year. Scholar- 
ships awarded to selected applicants include; 

• Presidential Scholarship 

• Dean's Scholarship 

• Leadership Scholarship 

• National Achievement, National Merit, and National 
Hispanic Scholarships 

Awarded to freshman applicants who were named National 
Achievement and National Merit finalists and National 
Hispanic semi-finalists who have designated American 
University as their first-choice college with the National Merit 
Scholarship Corporation by February 1 of their senor year. 

• Athletic Scholarship 

Interested students should contact the coach of the sport in 
which they excel. 

• United Methodist Scholarship 

For the children of acfive, ordained Methodist ministers. 



I 



26 Tuition. Expenses, and Financial Aid 



Private/Restricted Scholarships 

The university has a limited number of scholarships that are 
funded annually through endowment by donors. Applicants are 
re\iewed by Financial Aid for eligibility for these scholarships 
and no separate application is required. 

Grants 

Grants are need-based awards that do not have to be repaid 
and may originate form American Universit>', the federal gov- 
emment. or state governments. 
American University Programs 

AU grants are offered to eligible admitted students who dem- 
onstrate financial need, and may be offered in addition to an AU 
scholarship. 
Federal Programs 

Federal Pell Grant Program: This grant is offered to students 
demonstrating exceptional financial need. Awards range from 
approximately S400 to S4.000 per year. 
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 
(FSEOG). This grant is offered to students demonstrating ex- 
ceptional financial need. Awards depend on need and the avail- 
ability of hinds. 
State Programs 

Many states administer grant programs which residents may 
apply for and receive while attending American University. Stu- 
dents should check with guidance counselors and state grant 
agencies regarding up-to-date application procedures and eligi- 
bility factors. 

Loans 

AU Educational Loan 

The AU Educational Loan (AUEL) is available to students 
who have financial need and is flinded through American Uni- 
versity. Repayment begins six months after graduation. 

Federal Loan Programs 

Federal Direct Stafford Loan: This loan is guaranteed by the 
federal government. There are Uvo t>'pes of Stafford Loans: 
Subsidized Federal Loans are for eligible students who have 



demonstrated financial need; students who do not have demon- 
strated need are eligible for an Unsubsidized Federal Loan. Re- 
payment for both begins six months after graduation or when the 
student drops below 6 credit hours in any semester. No interest is 
charged on Subsidized Federal Loans while the student is in col- 
lege, interest does accrue on Unsubsidized Federal Loans. 
Undergraduate students may borrow up to S2.625 for the first 
year of sUidy; S3.500 for the second year; and $5,500 per aca- 
demic year after completing two years of undergraduate study. 
Federal Perkins Loan: This loan is fionded through American 
University and the federal government. Federal regulations re- 
quire that this loan be given to students with exceptional need. 
Awards \ary depending on need and availability and repayment 
begins nine months affer graduation. 

Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS): This fed- 
eral loan program is fiinded through private lenders and is 
available to the parents of dependent undergraduate students to 
assist them in meeting educational expenses. Repayment begins 
within 60 days of the loan's second disbursement. 

Federal Work-Study Program (FWS) 

This program for students with financial need provides the 
opportunity to work part-time and use earnings toward educa- 
tional expenses. 

Tuition Exchange 

American Universitv' participates in the Tuition Exchange 
Program for facult>' and staff members. Students whose parents 
are employed by one of the participating institutions may be eli- 
gible for a Tuition Exchange Scholarship. 

Tuition Remission 

Full-time faculty and staff members and their spouses or do- 
mestic partners are eligible for tuition benefits. There is a $50 
registration fee (nonreflmdable) per semester. 



Graduate Financial Aid 



Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 27 



The university offers graduate students a variety of ways to 
finance their education while in attendance at American Univer- 
sity, including: 

Federal Direct Loan 

Federal Graduate PLUS Loans 

Outside loans 

American Installment Plans 

For more information contact Financial Aid at 202-885-6 1 00 
or e-mail financialaid@american.edu. 

Graduate Deadlines 

Students should contact the graduate admission office in the 
school or college to which they are applying to find out the ap- 
plication deadline to be considered for merit awards such as fel- 
lowships, assistantships, and study grants. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 

Recipients of federal (Title IV) or instiuitional fluids must 
maintain satisfactory academic progress toward their degree ob- 
jective to remain eligible for financial assistance. 
Minimum Standards 

• Full-time graduate financial aid recipients must maintain at 
least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and complete 1 8 
credits hours per academic year. 

• Part-time graduate financial aid recipients must maintain at 
least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and complete 
four-fifths (80 percent) of all attempted credit hours. 

• All students must complete their academic program within 
1 50 percent of the normal time limit of that academic 
program as defined in the Academic Regulations. 

• Merit-based scholarship recipients may have different 
standards than those listed above. Please refer to the original 
award notification regarding merit award eligibility criteria. 

Special Considerations 

The following alternative grading options do not count to- 
ward the grade point average but do have an impact on students' 
satisfactory academic progress: 

• Withdrawals (W), Administrative Withdrawals (ZL), 
Audits (L), and Fails on Pass/Fail option (ZF) count as 
credits attempted but not earned, and have no impact on the 
grade point average. 

• Incompletes (I), Unreported Grades (N), and 
Administrative Failures (ZX) count as credits attempted but 
not earned, and are factored as a grade of F. 

• Pass (P) counts as credits attempted and earned, but has no 
I impact on the grade point average. 

• In Progress (IP) courses are excluded from the calculation 
in the initial academic progress evaluation. Students have 
one calendar year from the beginning of the course to 
successfully complete the course. If not completed in that 



time frame, the course counts as credits attempted but not 
earned, and is factored as a grade of F. 

Frequency of Monitoring 

Each student's academic progress is measured once yearly in 
June, after spring grades are posted. Financial Aid will notify in 
writing students who are not making satisfactory progress. 

Academic Appeals 

All questions regarding the factual substance of academic re- 
cords and all requests for changes to those records must be made 
to the academic departments. The Academic Regulations de- 
scribe the petition process. Financial Aid has no authority to al- 
ter the academic record of a student. 

Re-Establishing Financial Aid Eligibility 

For a student who has failed to maintain satisfactory aca- 
demic progress, eligibility for financial aid funds may be 
re-established in a number of ways. Among these are: the peti- 
tioning process described in the Academic Regulations; the 
changing of a grade; summer session attendance; and the com- 
pletion of incomplete or in progress courses. Please note that 
fiinds are not set aside for sttidents in these circumstances, even 
if the appeal is granted, fiinds may not be available at that time. 

Financial Aid Appeals 

On occasion, a student may fail to maintain satisfactory prog- 
ress due to very serious circumstances that caused a major dis- 
ruption to that student's ability to successfiilly complete his or 
her course work. Students with mitigating circumstances 
must request reconsideration in writing to Financial Aid 
prior to July 1 . The request should include a comprehensive de- 
scription of the circumstances and documentation fi-om at least 
two qualified persons who can verify the information. The Ap- 
peals Committee will review the appeal, make a recommenda- 
tion and send a letter of response to the student. 

Refund and Repayment Policy 

For American University's refund policies regarding tuition, 
housing and meal plan charges, see Refunds and Cancellation 
of Charges. 

The American University refiand policy does not apply to 
first-time American University students. A "first-time sttident" 
is defined in Federal regulations as any student who has not at- 
tended at least one class at American University, or who re- 
ceived a fiill refund for previous attendance at American 
University. 



28 Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



Federal (Title IV) Financial Aid 
Recipients Return of Title IV Funds 
Policy 

The Financial Aid Office is required by federal statute to re- 
calculate federal financial aid eligibility for students who with- 
draw, drop out, are dismissed, or take a leave of absence prior to 
completing 60 percent of a payment period or term. The federal 
Title IV financial aid programs must be recalculated in these sit- 
uations. 

If a student leaves the institution prior to completing 60 per- 
cent of a payment period or term, the Financial Aid Office recal- 
culates eligibility for Title IV fijnds. Recalculation is based on 
the percentage of earned aid using the following Federal Return 
of Title rv hands formula: 

Percentage of payment period or term completed = the num- 
ber of days completed up to the withdrawal date divided by the 
total days in the payment period or term. (Any break of five days 
or more is not counted as part of the days in the term.) This per- 
centage is also the percentage of earned aid. 

Funds are returned to the appropriate federal program based 
on the percentage of unearned aid using the following formula: 
Aid to be returned = ( 100 percent of the aid that could be 

disbursed minus the percentage of earned aid) multiplied by 

the total amount of aid that could have been disbursed during 

tlie payment period or term. 

If a student earned less aid than was disbursed, the institution 
would be required to return a portion of the ftinds and the student 
would be required to return a portion of the ftinds. When Title IV 
funds are retumed, the student borrower may owe a debit bal- 
ance to the institution. 

If a student earned more aid than was disbursed to him or her, 
the instimtion would owe the student a post-withdrawal dis- 
bursement which must be paid within 120 days of the student's 
withdrawal. The institution must return the amount of Title IV 
flinds for which it is responsible no later than 30 days after the 
date of the determination of the date of the student's withdrawal. 

Refijnds are allocated in the following order: 

• Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loans 

• Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans 

• Unsubsidized Direct Staftbrd Loans (other than PLUS 
Loans) 

• Subsidized Direct Stafford Loans 

• Federal Perkins Loans 

• Federal Parent (PLUS) Loans 

• Direct PLUS Loans 

• Federal Pell Grants for which a return of funds is required 

• Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grants for which a 
return of funds is required 

• Other assistance under Title IV for which a return of fiinds 
is required (e.g., LEAP) 



Federal Loans 

Graduate students who qualify for federal Stafford loans may 
borrow up to $ 1 8.500 every two semesters. All federal loan pro- 
grams require the FAFSA be filed before eligibility can be deter- 
mined. To be eligible for federal need and non-need based loans, 
graduate students must be: 

• a U.S. citizen or permanent resident 

• enrolled in a degree-granting academic program 

• registered for at least 6 credit hours per semester 
Federal loans must be re-paid. Repayment will begin six 

months after graduation or after dropping below half-time sta- 
tus. Federal interest rates are variable but will never exceed 
8 .25% on a federal loan. Please contact Financial Aid for current 
interest rates. 

Those students who need more than $ 1 8,500 over two semes- 
ters may take out a private loan to help cover any remaining edu- 
cational expenses. The amount that may be borrowed in an 
outside loan varies. 

American University Programs 

Graduate Merit-Based Awards 

American University is committed to quality graduate educa- 
tion that is responsive to the needs of students, disciplines, the 
university, and the larger community. Our goals are to provide a 
high quality educational experience for our students and to offer 
graduate support that assists students in completing their pro- 
grams of sUidy. To this end the university has set priorities for the 
allocation and awarding of graduate assistantships and fellow- 
ships as shown below. 

Recipients of all awards (except Dissertation Fellowships) 
must be full-time degree students. Specifically, this requires that 
a recipient be registered for a minimum of 9 credit hours during 
each semester of the academic year. Award recipients must 
maintain fiill-time status in order to continue to receive their 
award during the academic year. Awards are intended to assist 
graduate students to pursue ftill-time education. 

The university has established the following awards to assist 
graduate sUidents: 

Graduate Fellowships are merit-based awards that the univer- 
sity offers in order to attract the most outstanding students in the 
discipline. These awards are given to new graduate degree sm- 
dents and normally provide the recipient up to 24 hours of tui- 
tion remission in degree-related courses in a given academic 
year and may also provide a stipend. The tuition remission 
should be used during the academic year but may with the per- 
mission of the teaching unit head be used during the summer 
session. 

Special Opportunity Awards for minority students — American 
Indians. Atrican Americans, Asian/Pacific Islander Americans, 
Alaskan Native Americans, or Hispanic Americans — provide 
tuifion remission from 6 to 24 hours of degree-related courses in 
a given academic year. The tuition remission should be used 



Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 29 



during thie academic year but may with the peimission of" the 
teaching unit head be used during the summer session. 
Hall of F^atUms Awards are made by the deans of CAS, KSB, 
SOC, SIS, or SPA, as appropriate, with the approval of the Dean 
of Academic Affairs. These awards, which are for tuition remis- 
sion only, are given to international students who do not have 
pennanent residence status or U.S. citizenship. 
Dissertation Fellowships are awards that provide recipients 
with a stipend and up to 1 8 hours of tuition remission in one aca- 
demic year for dissertation seminar credits only. These awards 



arc limited to students who have completed all doctoral course 
work and comprehensive examinations and who have an ap- 
proved dissertation proposal at the time of application. Disserta- 
tion fellows are selected by the deans of CAS, SIS, or SPA, as 
appropriate, with the approval of the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

Designated Awards 

A description of other designated awards, such as United Meth- 
odist Awards and Massey Awards and their eligibility require- 
ments is distributed annually by the Dean of Academic Affairs. 



Veterans' Benefits 



American University's degree programs are approved for en- 
rollment of veterans (and eligible dependents of deceased or dis- 
abled veterans) for educational benefits under the various 
federal laws relating to veterans. While every effort has been 
made to provide accurate and complete information, changes in 
federal regulations and university policy may occur at any time 
without notice. The following should be considered informa- 
tional and not binding on the university. 
New Students 

Veterans entering American University must file a Veterans 
Application for VA Educational Benefits (22- 1 990) with a certi- 
fied copy of DD-2 14 through the Office of the Registrar. Service 
men and women wishing to receive Veterans Administration 
(VA) benefits for the first time must present the Serviceman's 
Application for VA Educational Benefits (22-1990), signed by 
the Education Office and the Commanding Officer Enrollment 
Certification (22-1999) is sent to the VA by the Office of the 
Registrar to initiate benefits for the enrollment period. 

Transfer sUidents who have received VA educational benefits 
at another institution and wish to receive VA benefits for the first 
time at American University should file a Request for Change of 
Program or Place of Training (22-1995) through the Office of 
the Registrar This form will be sent to the VA with the Enroll- 
ment Certification (22-1999) completed by the university. 

Continuing Students 

Continuing students must file the American University VA 
claim card for educational benefits each semester with the Of- 
fice of the Registrar All changes in registration (adds, drops, and 
withdrawals) must be reported to the Office of the Registrar. 



Payment and Financial Responsibility 

With the exception of disabled veterans who are training un- 
der Vocational Rehabilitation, all beneficiaries of VA educa- 
tional benefits are personally responsible for the payment of 
their bills to the university. VA checks for educational benefits 
are sent directly to the address designated on the American Uni- 
versity VA claim card. Students who wish to receive advance 
payment must file an advance payment request form. Students 
who are granted advance payment pick up only the first check 
from the Office of the Registrar Thereafter, checks are sent di- 
rectly to the address on file with the VA. 

VA benefits are awarded on the basis of the expected comple- 
tion of a certain number of credits each semester as stated on the 
Certification form. The VA interprets "complefion of credits" 
differently fi-om the university. Completion of credits is defined 
by the VA as grades of A, B, C, D, F, P or ZF. However, veterans 
who drop below the anticipated number of credits by receiving a 
W (withdrawals), L (audit), or N (no grade reported) will be in 
overpayment status according to the VA. Benefits will be re- 
duced for future periods of enrollment or, should no further en- 
rollment occur, students will have to reftind money directly to 
the VA. 

The VA directs the university to notify them of a change in 
status for students during or immediately after the end of the 
month in which the change occurs. Under mitigating circum- 
stances, exceptions to the above policies may be made through 
the Veterans Administration Regional Office. 

Forms and information are available from the Office of the 
Registrar, Asbury Building, second floor, 202-885-2235. 



Campus Life 



Student Learning and Development Services 

Campus Life Centers 

Intercultural Programs and Services 



The Office of the Vice President of Campus Life is located in 
Butler Pavilion 400. For more information, contact 
202-885-3310, campus life@american.edu or go to: 
www.american.edu/ocl . 

Recognizing students' unique needs and the diversity of 
American Uni\ ersity's student body, the Office of Campus Life 
promotes students" integration mto an inclusive university com- 
munity and supports and complements students' preparation for 
lifelong leaming and global citizenship. 

The Office of Campus Life is guided in this mission by as- 
sessment of students' characteristics, dedication to service and 
advocacy for smdents, and accountability' for our actions. The 
Vice President of Campus Life is the chief student affairs officer 
of the university and reports to the president. 

The Office of the Dean of Students is committed to cultivat- 
ing an environment that enriches and supports smdent develop- 
ment. The dean of students staff provides advocacy. 



information, referrals, and other assistance to students, and 
works closely with academic and administrative units to pro- 
mote student success. 

Student Conduct Code 

Each student is expected to adhere to established standards of 
behavior for members within the university community. Stu- 
dents must abide by all federal and local laws as well as all poli- 
cies and regulations of American University. The Student 
Conduct Code describes the rights and responsibilities for stu- 
dent conduct. By registering for classes or enrolling at American 
University, all students acknowledge their awareness of and 
agreement to adhere to the Student Conduct Code. The code is 
published annually in the Student Handbook, available from the 
Office of the Dean of Students and at: 
www.american.edii bcL dos. 



Student Learning and Development Services 



The primary' purpose of Student Leaming and Development 
Services is to assist students in developing the competencies that 
are critical for success in the academic setting and beyond. Col- 
laboration with faculty' is at the core of its programming and 
serves to strengthen its benefits for students. Through the ser- 
vices and programs provided, students may acquire specific 
skills that are directly applicable to their course work. 

Academic Support Center 

The Academic Support Center offers programs and services 
to all students to help them develop the skills and beha\ iors nec- 
essary for academic success in college. Services include indi- 
\ idual instruction in time management, textbook reading, note 
taking, and exam preparation. Students may also take advantage 
of study skills seminars, referrals for peer tutors, writing assis- 
tance, and supplemental instruction in selected courses. Ser- 
vices for students with leaming disabilities and ADHD include 
help with accommodations, a writing lab, a computer lab. and 
the Leaming Services Program for freshmen. Specific services 
are available for intemational students and student-athletes. Ser- 
vices are provided free of charge, except for special program 



fees and modest fees for peer tutors. The .Academic Support 
Center is located in Mar>' Graydon Center 243. 

For more information, call 202-885-3360 or go to: 
www.american.edu/ocL'asc . 

Community Service Center 

The Community Service Center provides a range of opportu- 
nities for di\ erse members of the university community to chal- 
lenge their beliefs, explore new cultures, and share their unique 
experiences through public service. It cultivates a sense of 
global citizenship that demands both public service and civil ac- 
tion. Students and facultv utilize the resources of Washington, 
D.C. to fotge academic leaming connections between class- 
room and community through service-learning. 

Some of the projects and programs that are available to the 
community are Freshman Service Experience, the Volunteer 
Clearinghouse. D.C. Reads. Community Service Floor, the Ea- 
gle Endowment for Public and Community Service, and Com- 
munitv' Ser\ ice Leaming Projects. For more information, call 
202-885-SERV (7378) or go to : www.american.edu- volunteer/ . 



30 



Campus Life 3 1 



Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center is located in Mary Graydon Center 
214. Ser\'iees and programs are available to help students de- 
velop the skills and insights they need to understand their own 
feelings and behaviors, solve personal and interpersonal prob- 
lems, and thrive in the university environment. 

The center offers individual and group counseling, crisis in- 
tervention, self-help materials, consultations, and referrals to 
off-campus resources for ser\'ices not available on campus. 
Counselors also conduct classes and workshops on topics re- 
lated to students' well-being (e.g., stress and anxiety, depression, 
anger management, eating and body image concerns, relation- 
ship issues, alcohol and drug use, et cetera). 

The center's staff includes psychologists, social workers, a 
consulting psychiatnst, and graduate-level clinical trainees. Ser- 
vices are confidential in accordance with professional and legal 
standards, and are free of charge. For more infomiation, call 
202-885-3500 or go to: http://american.edu/ociycounseling/ . 

Disability Support Services 

The stalTof Disability Support Services works to facilitate 
the full participation of students with physical and psychologi- 
cal disabilities in campus programs and activities. Ser\'ices and 
accommodations are provided to ensure equal access and to pro- 
mote the inclusion and involvement of students with disabilities 
in the American University community. This office also pro- 
vides consultation and in-service training for faculty, staff, and 
students, with the overall goal of ensuring a campus environ- 
ment that is welcoming to individuals with disabilities. The of- 
fice is located in Mary Graydon Center 206. For more 
infomiation. call 202-885-3315 (V/TDD). 

Judicial Affairs and Mediation Services 

.ludicial Affairs and Mediation Services provides an orga- 
nized judicial system founded on principles of equity, fairness, 
and due process for the resolution of grievances in the American 
University community. In addition, this ofTice promotes the 
learning and use of alternative dispute resolution methods. 

Judicial Affairs addresses alleged violations of the Student 
Conduct Code, Regulations for Student Conduct in the Resi- 
dence Halls, and other university policies. The Conduct Council 
is a community review board composed of students, faculty, and 
staff members that provides an excellent experiential learning 
opportunity. All students, regardless of their majors, are encour- 
aged to take active roles in the judicial system on campus. 

American University's Mediation Services (AUMS) pro- 
vides resources for the resolution of interpersonal and 
inter-group conflicts to all members of the AU community. 
AUMS helps parties Icam about sources of and responses to 
conflict and their roles in this dynamic process. Services include 
conflict consultation, assessment and evaluation, mediation, fa- 
cilitation, and post-conflict reconciliation. Services are confi- 
dential and free of charge to all students, faculty, and staff. 



AUMS also provides alternative dispute resolution (ADR) and 
conflict management skill-building workshops. Students, fac- 
ulty, and staff are welcome to participate in basic mediation 
skills training offered each semester. 

Judicial Affairs and Mediation Services is located in Butler 
Pavilion 408. For more information, call 202-885-3328, e-mail 
JAMS@american.edu or AUMS(aJamerican.edu or go to: 
vyvyw.american.edu/ocl/sccrs . 

New Student Programs 

New Student Programs designs and coordinates orientation 
programs for first year and transfer students. Through summer, 
fall, and spring orientation programs, the staff assists new stu- 
dents in their transition to American University. Tfie office also 
coordinates Family Weekend in October and other programs to 
enhance the quality of life for all American University students. 
For more information, call 202-885-3303, e-mail 
orientation(@american.edu or go to: 
vyww.american.edu/oc l/orientation . 

Student Health Center 

The Student Health Center (SHC) provides primary medical 
care, minor emergency care, gynecological care, immuniza- 
tions, allergy injections, and health education services to sUi- 
dents. Routine office visits are without cost, but additional 
charges may be assessed for the allergy clinic, TB testing, im- 
munizations, and other special services. 

The clinical staff consists of registered nurses and physician 
assistants, supported and supervised by two internal medicine 
physicians. These primary care practitioners initiate treatment 
and coordinate all aspects of care, including referrals to special- 
ists when indicated. Patients are seen on a walk-in basis. Ap- 
pointments are made for annual women's health exams. To 
schedule an appointment, call 202-885-3380. 
Health Education Program 

The Health Education Program, supported by a Weltaess 
Project Team of students, faculty, and staff, promotes student 
health and wellness activities on campus throughout the year. 
Outreach activities include residence hall programs, a cam- 
pus-wide Health Fair, alcohol and other drug awareness pro- 
grams, and general health and women's health education teams. 

Student Health Insurance 

Health insurance is mandatory for all fijll-time degree, resi- 
dent, and international students, unless the student is covered 
under another comparable health insurance plan. The fee is as- 
sessed automatically unless waiv ed prior to the deadline. Waiver 
forms must be completed on-line at my.amcrican.edu . Medical 
insurance coverage is available at an additional cost to part-time 
sUidents carrying at least 6 credit hours, spouses, domestic part- 
ners, and children of students enrolled in the student health in- 
surance plan. 

For infomiation call the Student Health Insurance Oftlce at 
202-885-3378 or go to: www.american.edu/ocl/liealthcenter/ . 



32 Campus Life 

Tuition Refund Insurance Plan 

The Tuition Refund Plan can minimize financial loss incurred 
in a medical withdrawal from the university-. This elective insur- 
ance plan provides co\ erage for tuition and housing charges. The 
plan extends and enhances the university's published refund pol- 

Campus Life Centers 



icy. To participate, applications and fees must be returned before 
the first day of fall semester classes. For specific benefits and limi- 
tations, premium, and other information, contact the Student 
Health hisurance coordinator at 202-885-3298. 



Housing and Dining Programs 

Housing and Dining Programs (HDP ) is responsible for daily 
operations in American University's residence halls as well as 
management of the professional and smdent staff. Housing and 
Dining Programs is also responsible for the management of 
AU's off-campus apartment building. Park Bethesda. Comple- 
menting the goals of the Office of Campus Life, HDP seeks to 
create and maintain an environment that fosters intellectual, so- 
cial, and emotional growth. The staff works to provide a safe and 
comfortable living environment that encourages respect for in- 
dividual rights and social responsibility. 

Housing and Dining Programs is responsible for applications 
for student housing, student room assignments, summer hous- 
ing, and conference operations. Physical Plant is responsible for 
the maintenance of equipment as well as housekeeping in the 
residence halls. Housing and Dining Programs staff oversee mi- 
nor maintenance repairs. 

American Uni\ersit>"s nine residence halls have distinct 
characteristics and offer a \ariety of living arrangements. Sev- 
eral special interest housing options are available in the halls, in- 
cluding the Communitv Service Floor, Honors Program, and 
Leonard Intercultural Hall. 

Visitors to AU's residence halls must check in at the front 
desk and be escorted while in the hall. Residents ma> not lend 
their access cards and keys to guests. There are no curfews; 
24-hour visitation is the policy in each hall. Overnight guests are 
permitted only with the agreement of the roommate. In all cases, 
overnight guests are limited to a 3-day stay. Residents are re- 
sponsible for their guests' behavior and may be charged in lieu 
of their guests for violations of the Student Conduct Code and 
damage to uni\ ersity property. 

The Off-Campus Housing Resource Center at American 
University ser\es AU students and the communit>' by pro\ idmg 
support to those looking for housing, as well as to those who 
wish to list rental property. In addition to a comprehensive, 
up-to-date web site of rental listings, information on land- 
lord tenant relationships, and helpfiil hints and advice about the 
housing search process are also a\'ailable. 

Housing is available to undergraduate students on a 
first-come, first-served basis. For ftirther informadon call 
202-885-3370 or go to: www.american.edu ocL'housing . 



Residence Hall Association 

The Residence Hall Association (RHA) is the student gov- 
ernment and program planning organization of the residence 
halls. RHA works with Housing and Dining Programs to ensure 
that university policies and services are responsive to students' 
needs. The Executive Board, the highest branch of the RHA, is 
the link beU\ een the administration and students. The Execurive 
Board, in conjunction with the hall and floor officers, organizes 
both hall and campus-wide programs. Tlie Execurive Board and 
hall councils are elected in the spring and ser\'e one-year terms. 
Floor officers are elected at the beginning of the fall semester 
and serve one-year terms. Floor officers work with the Resident 
Assistants (RAs) to plan activities such as movie nights, study 
breaks, and forums. 

RHA provides both social and educational programming 
within each hall and across campus. For more information, call 
202-885-1 RHA (xl742), e-mail rhafaamerican.edu or go to: 
www.american.edu; ocL'liousing'RHA'index.htiTi . 

Kay Spiritual Life Center 

The Kay Spiritual Life Center is an interfaith house of wor- 
ship and home to a rich array of faith communities, cultural and 
educational programs, student organizations, feasts, festivals, 
circles of prayer, and activism. In keeping with the university's 
commimient to inquin,' and di\ersity, the Kay Spiritual Life 
Center seeks to be not only a center for religious life, but a place 
where people of conscience, intellect, and spiritual curiosity 
come with their questions, their dreams, and their struggles. The 
center fosters a climate of interfaith understanding and open- 
ness, in which matters of faith and v alue are recognized as an in- 
tegral part of human growth and university life. 

Regular services of worship and religious observances are 
held throughout the year by Baha'i, Buddhist, Catholic, Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Jewish, Muslim, United 
MethodistProtestant, Quaker, and Unitarian Universalist com- 
munities. Meditation from a variety of traditions is also offered. 
In addition, the center sponsors special interfaith celebrations, as 
well as a variety of workshops, panel discussions, retreats, out- 
ings, and social action opportunities. 

Chaplains from the diverse faith traditions assist in organiz- 
ing events and are available to students, facultv', and staff for 
pastoral counseling and spiritual direction, residence hall pro- 
gramming, advisement on issues of faith and ethics, life events, 
baptisms, batl^ar mitzvahs, weddings, and memorial services. 



Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 33 



The Kay Interfaith Council serves to foster dialogue and dis- 
cussion among the member communities of the Kay Center, pro- 
vides for collective interfaith action, and promotes awareness of 
and respect for interfaith issues. The Center for Community Ac- 
tion and Social Justice Coalition (CASJC). also located in the Kay 
Center, is a student-led consortium of clubs committed to express- 
ing spirituality through active engagement in pursuit of a more just 
and peacefiil world. This office serves as a resource for AU stu- 
dents seeking to work for responsible social change. 

TTie Kay Spiritual Life Center is located at the north end of 
the Friedheim Quadrangle. Hours of operation dunng the fall 
and spring semesters are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Fri- 
day. For more information, call 202-885-3320, e-mail 
kslc@american.edu or go to: www.american.edu/ocl/kay/ . 

University Center 

The mission of the University Center is to provide a welcom- 
ing environment for AU suidents, faculty, staff, alumni, and visi- 
tors, and to support programs, activities, and services that 
promote community, individual growth, responsible citizen- 
ship, and a global perspective. University Event Scheduling 
(UES) manages the scheduling for all events on campus. The 
student staff includes event service coordinators and event 
crews to facilitate events held in the center's facilities and an in- 
formation desk staff at the entrance to Mary Graydon Center. 
The University Center administrative office is located in Mary 
Graydon Center 274. 

Student Activities 

Student Activities is a department of the University Center in 
the Office of Campus Life. The Student Activities staff serves as 
advisors, mentors, and facilitators to the student leaders and 
members of more than 1 80 recognized clubs, coalitions, student 
government departments, and student media groups. The Stu- 
dent Activities team helps to prepare students for life-long leam- 
ing and global citizenship by promoting and supporting campus 
activities that appeal to a diverse community. The main goals are 
to provide students with infonnation on how to get involved in 
student activities at American University and to provide leaders 
with the tools they need to be successflil. Student Activities is lo- 
cated in Mary Graydon Center 274. 

Student .\ctivitics Organizations 

The four broad categories of organizations that Student Ac- 
tivities advises are: American University Club Council associa- 
tions and clubs, smdent coalitions, student government, and 
student media. 

American Universitj Club Council: Associations and Clubs 

Many students enhance their collegiate e-xperiences by get- 
ting involved in student-sponsored associations and clubs. Stu- 
dent Acti\ities annually recognizes approximately 100 student 
associations and clubs. These organizations span a wide range of 
interests, including social life, academics, business, fellowship, 
music, journalism, ser\ ice. recreation, and religion, and allow 
students to develop their talents and enhance organizational 



skills. Membership in student associations and clubs is open to 
all registered American University students and can provide op- 
portunities for meeting other students, neuvorking with faculty 
and staff learning outside the classroom, and developing leader- 
ship skills. For more information or to obtain a complete list of 
clubs and organizations contact Student Activities at 
202-885-3390 or go to: www.american.edu/bc I/activities . 

The American University Club Council (AUCC) is the gov- 
erning board for all clubs recognized by Student Activities. In 
addition to allocating student activity fees to the clubs the 
AUCC is responsible for mediating club disputes, encouraging 
collaboration among clubs, and helping clubs do business more 
efficiently. For more information, call 202-885-6453 or email 
aucc@american . edu . 
Student Coalitions 

Coalitions are smdent initiated and run advocacy and pro- 
gramming groups that are designed to centralize the efforts of 
many sUident clubs, and organizations that have a common 
agenda. Coalitions can also include faculty, staff and alumni 
members. Student Activities currently recognizes two coali- 
tions; The Ethnic and Cultural Coalition and the Community 
Action and Social Justice Coalition (CASJC). For more infor- 
mation or to obtain contact information for the Student Coali- 
tions, contact Student Activities at 202-885-3390 or go to: 
www.american.edu; bcl/activities . 
Student Government 

There are two student government organizations advised 
through Student Activities: the undergraduate Student Govern- 
ment (SG) and the Graduate Leadership Council (GLC). 

The Student Government (SG) represents student interests, 
advocates for student concems, and provides service to the stu- 
dent body. The SG executive office is the administrative branch 
of the SG and is located in Mary Graydon Center 270. It can be 
reached at 202-885-6400 or vvww.ausg.org 

The General Assembly (GA) is the legislative branch of the 
SG and is located in Mary Graydon Center 269. The GA is re- 
sponsible for allocating student activity fees to SG departments, 
enacting legislation to fiorther the interests of undergraduate stu- 
dents, approving rules and regulations governing the SG and 
acting as a forum for student concems. The Student Union 
Board (SUB) is the social programming di\ ision of the Student 
Government and books bands, comedians, and other talent, and 
shows movies. The Kennedy Political Union (KPU) is a nonpar- 
tisan student lecture bureau. Founded in 1968, KPU has grown 
into a nationally respected lecture series. 

The Graduate Leadership Council (GLC) is the graduate stu- 
dent go\emmcnt at American Universit>'. The GLC is composed 
of the five school/college Graduate Student Council (GSC) presi- 
dents, a chair and a vice chair. Tlie GLC objective is to maximize 
students' return on their mandatory student activity fees by allocat- 
ing a greater portion of activity fee revenue to each GSC. The GLC 
also provides smdents with opportunities and events more focused 
on their field-.specific interests as well as advocates for graduate 



34 Campus Life 



student concerns. For more information contact 202-885-2472 or 
stop by the GLC Office in 262 Mary Graydon Center. 
Student Media 

The student community supports and manages the following 
campus media: 

• A-TV is a student-operated television station that airs news, 
sports, and entertainment programs. Located in Mary 
Graydon Center 256. A-TV broadcasts to residence hall 
lounges and rooms except on the Tenley Campus. For more 
information, call 202-885-2222. 

• American Literary (AmLit) publishes student works of 
creative art. photography, and literature. It is located in 
Marv Gravdon Center 248. For more information, call 
202-885-6414. 

• American Word is an on-line news magazine written by 
shidents about students and student-related issues. For more 
information, call 202-885-6418 or go to: 
www.amwordonline.com. 



Intercultural Programs and Services 



ne Eagle is American University's student newspaper, 
published twice a week during the academic year and twice 
during the summer months. The newsroom and business 
offices are located in Mary Graydon Center 252. To contact 
The Eagle, call 202-885-1400 or go to: 
www.theeagleonline.com . 

Tlie Talon, the American University yearbook, captures the 
issues, events, and people that mark each academic year. 
Tlie Talon office is located in Mary Graydon Center 250. To 
contact Tlie Talon, call 202-885-1422. 

WVAU is a student-operated radio station and airs a 
contemporary music format along with a variety of sports 
and entertainment programs to the campus residence halls. 
To contact WVAU, call 202-885-1212. 



The primary goal of Intercultural Services is to enhance the 
quality of student life and to foster one of the university's dis- 
tinctive educational characteristics, which is its cosmopolitan 
and multicultural campus population. 

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and 
Ally Resource Center 

The Gay, Lesbian. Bisexual. Transgender, and Ally 
(GLBTA) Resource Center works to strengthen and sustain an 
inclusive campus community that welcomes people of all sexual 
orientations and gender identities by providing support, educa- 
tional resources, and advocacy. The Resource Center houses a 
library of books and magazines, hosts events and speakers, and 
conducts campus educational trainings on a regular basis. All 
programs are open to all members of the American University 
community. 

Tlie office is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
and is located in Mary Graydon Center 20 1 . The Resource Cen- 
ter can be reached by phone at 202-885-3347, by fax at 
202-885-1883, by e-mail at glbta@american.edu, or go to: 
www.american.edu/ocl/glbta . 

International Student & Scholar Services 

International Student & Scholar Services (ISSS) provides 
cross-cultural advising and programming to all members of the 
university community, as well as specialized immigration sup- 
port services to foreign students and exchange visitors. 

ISSS administers the United States Immigration Services and 
the State Department's authorized international education ex- 
change programs. These programs, also known as the Fl 
Non-Immigrant Academic and Language Student Programs and 
the Jl Exchange Visitors Programs, assist students, scholars, 



professors, researchers, and others who come to the university 
for temporary periods for the purpose of educational exchange. 

To assist international students, specific and unique support 
services are provided in pre-arrival, arrival, on-going, and 
re-entry orientation and guidance; issuance of appropriate cer- 
tificates of eligibility; assistance regarding academic, social, 
cultural or personal matters of a cross-cultural namre; practical 
training and work authorization pennits; and financial counsel- 
ing and financial certification, ISSS is located in Butler Pavilion 
410, 202-885-3350. For more information, go to 
wvyw.american.edu/ocl/isss . 

Multicultural Affairs 

Multicultural Affairs ad\ocates for an inclusive campus en- 
vironment that values a pluralistic perspective by collaborating 
with all segments of the university to provide academic support 
for ethnic minority students, and educational programming and 
resources for all. The staff provides counseling and tutoring ser- 
vices to Afiican, AsianPacific, Hispanic, and Native American 
students, advises ethnic and cultural clubs, and addresses di- 
verse cultural interests through lectures, seminars, historical 
tours, receptions, award ceremonies, and festival events. 

Multicultural Affairs also administers the Frederick 
Douglass Scholarship Program, the Summer Transition Enrich- 
ment Program (STEP), the High School/College Internship Pro- 
gram (HI/SCIP), and a mentoring program. Tlie office, located 
in Mary Graydon Center 204, houses historical and cultural ma- 
terials, as well as career infomiation for undergraduate and grad- 
uate students. For more information, or to be added to the 
Multicultural Affairs listserv, call 202-885-3651, go to 
www.american.edu/ocl/ma , or email oma@american.edu. 



Career Services, 
Internships, and Merit 
Awards 



The AU Career Center serves all undergraduate and graduate 
students in the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Com- 
munication, the School of International Service, and the School 
of Public Affairs. Kogod School of Business and Washington 
College of Law students are served by their respective cen- 
ters.The Career Center is located in Butler Pavilion, 5*^ floor 
For more information about job listings, internships, career 
planning, graduate school advising, and nationally competitive 
student scholarships, call 202-885-1804 or go to: 
www.american.edu/careercenter . 

Career education is a life-long process and the Career Center 
is the place to begin. The Career Center offers a sequence of 
services designed to accompany and enhance students' aca- 
demic studies. These integrated, comprehensive career services 
are available for American University students and alumni. 

Students are encouraged to use the Career Center's services to 
develop career awareness as early as possible in their academic 
programs. The center's advisors assist students to obtain field 
experience related to their education and career goals. The Of- 
fice of Merit Awards helps undergraduate and graduate students 
identify, prepare, and apply for a variety of nationally competi- 
tive, merit-based scholarships and fellowships (primarily for use 
after graduation). Career advisors provide students and alumni 
with career decision-making assistance, job-search coaching, 
expert career advising, graduate school advising, and the latest 
information on employment trends and instructional technolo- 
gies. The Outreach and Marketing team helps connect students 
with alumni and employers through networking events, job and 
internship fairs and listings, on-campus interviews, and 
employer presentations. 

All Career Center services may be pursued concurrently with 
classroom learning tliroughout students' academic programs. 
The following is a summary of a career decision-making pro- 
cess for each year of academic study: 

Freshman: Going through a process of self-assessment to iden- 
tify interests, skills, and values using tools such as the MBTI and 
Strong Interest Inventory. Exploring academic majors and ca- 
reer options. 

Sophomore: Declaring academic majors, exploring career op- 
tions, preparing resumes and cover letters, gaining hands-on ex- 
perience through internships, and exploring options for 
nationally competitive, merit-based scholarships. 



Junior: Focusing on career fields and gaining experience in spe- 
cific disciplines through internships. Practicing mock inter- 
views and conducting informational interviews with alumni. 
Exploring graduate school and nationally competitive scholar- 
ship options. 

Senior/Graduate Student: Determining and pursuing post-grad- 
uate goals of either an active job search or application for 
post-graduate study. 

Career Center Services 

Graduate School Advising: To help students explore and pur- 
sue graduate, law and medical school, our staff will guide you 
through individual appointinents, specialized workshops, and 
mock interviews. 

Career and Internship Advising: Four AU colleges and 
schools of the university have designated advisors in the Career 
Center who counsel and coach sUidents on career development, 
internship and job search preparation and employment issues. 
Career Resource Library and Computer Lab: Career explo- 
ration and job search assistance is provided through our collec- 
tion of career directories, books, periodicals, and extensive 
web-based resources. Staff and Peer advisors are available to as- 
sist sUidents to learn about the resources available. One com- 
puter is equipped with software providing access for visually 
impaired students. 

Online Tools: The Career Center Web site offers interactive 
tools and other resources for students such as resume building, 
video mock interviews, and crafting cover letters for internship 
and job searches. These tools help meet students" immediate 
needs and prepare them for individualized appointments with 
advisors. 

Alumni Net>>orking: Tliousands of alumni are registered with 
the Alumni On-Line Community and arc willing to provide in- 
formation to students about careers. Alumni are searchable by 
professional field, degree, company, and geographic location, 
all readily accessible on-line. Alumni panels and networking re- 
ceptions arc conducted regularly. 

Job Search Support: Workshops and resources are offered on 
resume writing, effective interviewing skills, salary negotiation 
and more. These are designed to help students make a planned 
transition from college to work and to hilly capitalize on intern- 
ships and employment opportunities. 



35 



36 Career Services. Internships, and Merit Awards 



Self-Assessment Tools: The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, 
Strong Interest InventoryT". and Self Directed Search are avail- 
able to help students assess their career interests. 
Special Events: Career Center staff host multiple events includ- 
ing job and internship fairs that bring employer representatives 
to campus from a wide variety of organizations to meet with stu- 
dents. In addition, students have access to numerous networking 
receptions with alumni employers, and multiple employer pre- 
sentations throughout the academic year. 
Off-Campus Federal Work Study: Smdents who have re- 
ceived Federal Work Study awards are encouraged to explore 
working otTcampus, tutoring through D.C. Reads or working in 
a community service organization. 

Employment Programs 

Job Listings: Using the latest technology, the Career Center an- 
nually lists thousands of jobs and internships online for students 
and recent alumni via AU CareerWeb. This exceptional career 
management tool is used extensively by students, alumni and 
employers. 

Recruiting Program: Students who maintain active profiles in 
AU CareerWeb may apply for a variety of internships and jobs, 
and ultimately interview with recruiters who visit campus each 
semester or who utilize our resume referral services. 
Information Sessions: Employer presentations give students 
the opportunity to learn about numerous organizations, career 
fields, interview processes, and hiring trends within a variety of 
industries. 

Job and Internship Fairs: Two fairs are held each year, one in 
the fall and one in the spring. Each typically attracts approxi- 
mately 1 50 employers from a vast range of organizations. 

Internships 

In order to integrate the academic curriculum with profes- 
sional experience. American University's academic internships 
enable students to earn credit for field experience related to their 
education and career goals. Students may choose to intern for 
credit but are not required to do so. Most intemships for credit 
are part-time. Some positions are paid. Opportunities exist with 
private businesses; local, state, and federal governments; and 
nonprofit, social service, and international organizations. 

Faculty from all university departments guide and evaluate 
students' experiential learning through academic intemships. 
These experiences enable students to explore academic and ca- 
reer options, make career decisions, and prepare for entry into 
either an advanced degree program or the professional job mar- 
ket. Personal development, acquisition of independent learning 
skills, and a balanced education are other significant benefits to 
students participating in intemships. 



Eligibility and Degree Credit for Academic Internships 

Opportunities are open to qualified degree-seeking under- 
graduate and graduate students. Applicants must be in good aca- 
demic standing and must obtain approval from appropriate 
academic advisors. Students must have completed at least the 
freshman year (30 credit hours), a full semester as transfer stu- 
dents ( 1 2 credit hours), or 9 credit hours as graduate students be- 
fore they are eligible. Undergraduates must have a minimum 
GP.A. of 2.00; graduate students must have a minimum GP.A. 
of 3.00. Schools or departments may stipulate additional 
eligibility criteria. 

There is no guarantee of selection, nor is a student obligated 
to accept offers of employment. However, once hired under the 
auspices of the university's intemship program, a student is ex- 
pected to complete all employment and academic obligations 
agreed to at the time of registration. 

Working with a career advisor, qualified candidates apply di- 
rectly to the employers. Students register for credit (with their 
academic advisors) once an employer selects them for a 
position. 

Intemship positions must be reviewed and approved for 
credit by department faculty. Hundreds of academic and non-ac- 
ademic intemships are posted on the Career Center Web site 
each temi, and students may propose intemships of their own 
design. Intemships must be a minimum of eight hours per week 
for up to two credit hours, 1 5 hours per week for three credit 
hours, and 20 hours per week for four to six credit hours. Stu- 
dents are required to demonstrate what they have leamed 
through written journals, papers, reports, portfolios, confer- 
ences, or seminars. Specific requirements are set by intemship 
faculty in their syllabi. All credit-bearing intemships are for a 
minimum of 1 2 consecutive weeks per term, and should include 
no more than 15 percent of clerical work. 

Students working full time in credit-based experiences are 
considered flill-time students by the university. Undergraduates 
enroll in xxx-391/491 Intemship and graduate students in 
xxx-691 Intemship. 
International Internships 

Credit-based intemship opportunities are available abroad. 
Students should have a demonstrated knowledge of the lan- 
guage of the country in which they expect to work, and previous 
work experience. Several months' lead time is essential to work 
toward securing these jobs. Infomiation is available from the in- 
ternational intemship advisor in the Career Center, 5"! tloor 
Butier Pavilion, at 202-885-1804 or 
www.american.edu/careercenter. 



Career Services, Internships, and Merit Awards 37 



Office of Merit Awards 

The Office of Merit Awards helps enrolled students prepare 
applications for highly competitive merit-based scholarships 
and fellowships, such as the Marshall Scholarship, which pro- 
vides two years of study at a British University; the $30,000 
Harry S. Truman Scholarship; and the Fulbright Grant for a year 
of research and graduate study in a foreign country. In the past 
three years, American University has had five Truman Scholars 
(of 65 nationwide annually). In 2008-2009 there were eight 
Fulbright Grant recipients, among numerous other awardees. 
Awards exist for nearly every major and provide a wide range of 
opportunities. American University graduate and undergraduate 
students have been awarded challenging internships, the chance 



to live, study, and conduct research or work abroad, and 
significant flinds to attend graduate school. 

Students work with our professional staff to identify appro- 
priate awards and prepare competitive proposals. Appointments 
may be made by calling the Career Center front desk at 202- 
885-1 804. Students should begin thinking about awards as early 
as their sophomore year and may be invited to participate in the 
Early Identification Program (EIP) if they have achieved a high 
degree of academic success during their freshman year. 

For more information about national merit awards and fel- 
lowships, contact the Office of Merit Awards at 202-885-1 804 
or go to: 
www.american.edu/careercenter/meritawards/ 



Registration 



Degree and Nondegree Registration 
International Student Registration 
Course and Schedule Information 



Academic Advising 

Academic advising is an essential element of the educational 
process. American Uni\ersity requires advisor/student confer- 
ences at least once a semester, but students hav e the responsibil- 
ity for selecting their courses, meeting course prerequisites, and 
adliering to university policies and procedures. The advisor as- 
sists the student in obtaining a well-balanced education and in- 
terprets uni\ersity policies and procedures 

Students should be aware of the university's many advising 
resources and utilize these resources as needs arise. Students 
may consult faculty and peer advisors, department chairs, deans, 
and student support services throughout the university. The uni- 
versity has the responsibility to ensure tliat adxising resources 
maintain high standards for serving students effectively and effi- 
ciently. 

The university uses a degree audit system (DARS) to track 
undergraduate students' academic progress. The DARS report 
displays academic program requirements completed and to be 
fijlfilled. Prior to an official declaration of major, the reports are 
based on requirements for the smdent's intended major Smdents 
may request a copy of their degree audit report trom their adv i- 
sor or the Office of the Registrar, or on line from their my.amer- 
ican.edu account. 

Continuing Degree and Nondegree 
Student Registration 

Note: International sUidents in F 1 or J 1 student status are not el- 
igible to enroll as nondegree sUidents. International sUidents in F 
1 or J 1 student status should refer to specific instructions for in- 
temational students. 

Course Registration 

Currently-enrolled smdents receive registration information 
through their American University e-mail account each fall (for 
spring registration) and spring (for fall and summer registra- 
tion). 

1 .Check your AU e-mail account for infonnation concerning 
registration. 
2. Schedule an appointment w ith your academic advisor. 



Nondegree students receive academic advising and registra- 
tion assistance through the academic department in which they 
intend to study. 

3. Before meeting with your academic advisor, prepare a draft 
course schedule. It is your responsibility to select a schedule of 
courses that is free of day/time conflicts. For updated schedule 
information check; 

www.american.edu'provost 'registrar schedule/class.cfin 

4. With your advisor, confirm or revise your semester course 
schedule. Your advisor will enter an electronic signature into the 
student registration system to document authorization of your 
registration. This approval must be in the system before you will 
be allowed to register for classes. 

5. Be sure that you have met all the prerequisites and obtained all 
required approvals and authorizations for the courses for which 
you intend to register. You will only be pennitted to register for 
courses for which you have met the prerequisite or received a 
waiver. 

In addition to meeting course prerequisites, all students wishing 
to take courses in Applied Music (Department of Performing 
Arts), the Kogod School of Business, and the School of Com- 
munication must obtain approval from the department or school. 
Students must obtain all permissions or prerequisite waivers 
from the appropriate departments prior to registration. 

6. Clear any outstanding financial or other stops before attempt- 
ing to register 

7. Confirm the dates when you are eligible to register Under- 
graduate students may register starting on the date correspond- 
ing to their completed credits. 

8. Log onto my.american.edu , go to "Course Registration," and 
follow the instructions for registration. Before processing your 
registration, you should verify that your chosen course sections 
are still open. To view the Schedule of Classes from my.amer- 
ican.edu. click on Schedule of Classes: General from the Learn 
@ AU menu. 

Admission to courses is subject to space a\ailability and con- 
firmation of eligibilit>'. Your enrollment in courses will be con- 
firmed immediately, but validation of registration is subject to 
settlement of your student account within the stipulated period 



38 



Registration 39 



for payment of tuition and fees. Failure to comply with payment 
schedules may result in cancellation of your registration and will 
necessitate reregistering for courses. 

Note: students will not be allowed to re-enroll in course sec- 
tions that have closed. 

The following are not available for web registration: intem- 
ship, cooperative education field experience, independent study 
or reading, community service learning projects, consortium. 
Washington Semester or AU Abroad programs, alumni audit, 
maintaining matriculation (graduate suidents). and any courses 
with a variable credit value. 

Once registered, students can view their semester schedules 
at My Schedule (under "Academics"). To make registration 
changes (add/drop ) w ithin permitted time periods, go to "Course 
Registration" and follow the insmjctions to add or drop courses. 

See Changes in Registration for more information on add- 
ing and dropping courses. 

Special Departmental Requirements for Nondegree 
Students: 

Departmental approval must be obtained for nondegree reg- 
istration in courses at the 600 or 700 level. 

School of International Service (SIS): Approval must be ob- 
tained for all courses at the 500, 600. or 700 level. 

Kogod School of Business (KSB): .'\ppro\al must be ob- 
tained for nondegree registration in all KSB courses. In addition, 
nondegree students must demonstrate that prerequisites have 
been met. If prerequisites have been completed at a college or 
university other than American University, students must pro- 
vide copies of appropriate transcripts. Graduate students must 
have satisfactory GMAT scores, and a satisfactory grade point 
average in the last 60 hours of undergraduate work. Students 
must provide copies of all undergraduate and graduate tran- 
scripts and GMAT results. 

School of Communication (SOC): Approval must be ob- 
tained for nondegree registration in all SOC courses. 

First-Time Degree and Nondegree 
Student Registration 

Note: AllF-1 andJ-1 international students who are enrolling at 
American University for the first time or for a new program are 
required to bring to International Student & Scholar Services 
(ISSS) their passport, 1-94, and 1-20. or DS-2019. Non-native 
speakers of English, regardless of citizenship, must take an Eng- 
lish language proficiency test before they register. International 
students in F-1 or J-1 student status should refer to specific in- 
structions for international students. International suidents in 
F-1 or J-1 saident status are not eligible to enroll as nondegree 
students. 

1 . Schedule an appoinnnent with your academic advisor 
New nondegree students must meet with an advisor in the 

school or department in which they intend to study. 

2. With your advisor, select your semester course schedule. Your 
advisor will enter an electronic signature into the student regis- 



tration system to document authorization of your registration. 
This approval must be in the system before you can be registered 
for classes. 

For updated schedule information check: 
wvyw.american.edu''provostyregistrar/schedule/class.cfTn 

Be sure that you have met all the prerequisites and obtained 
all required approvals and authorizations for the courses for 
w hich you intend to register. You will only be pennitted to regis- 
ter for courses for which you have met the prerequisite or re- 
ceived a waiver 

In addition to meeting course prerequisites, all students wish- 
ing to take courses in Applied Music (Department of Performing 
Arts), Kogod School of Business, and School of Communica- 
tion must obtain approval from the department or school. Stu- 
dents must obtain all permissions or prerequisite waivers from 
the appropriate departments prior to registration. 
3. New students are eligible to register anytime after the begin- 
ning of General Registration for the semester Initial registra- 
tions for all new smdents must be processed by your academic 
advisor or by the Office of the Registrar. 

Admission to courses is subject to space availability and con- 
firmation of eligibility. Your enrollment in courses will be con- 
firmed immediately, but validation of registrafion is subject to 
settlement of your smdent account within the stipulated period 
for payment of Uiition and fees. Failure to comply with payment 
schedules may result in cancellation of registration and will ne- 
cessitate reregistering for courses. 

Note: students will not be allowed to re-enroll in course sec- 
tions that have closed. 

New undergraduates must contact their advisor to make any 
changes to their course registrafion prior to the first day of 
classes for the semester New graduate sUidents may add and 
drop courses online at any time after their initial registration by 
logging onto my.american.edu . 

See Changes in Registration for more information on add- 
ing and dropping courses. 

Special Departmental Requirements for Nondegree 
Students: 

Departmental approval must be obtained for nondegree reg- 
istration in courses at the 600 or 700 level. 

School of Intemarional Service (SIS): Approval must be ob- 
tained for all courses at the 500, 600, or 700 level. 

Kogod School of Business (KSB): Approval must be ob- 
tained for nondegree registration in all KSB courses. In addition, 
nondegree students must demonstrate that prerequisites have 
been met. If prerequisites have been completed at a college or 
university other than American University, suidents must pro- 
vide copies of appropnate transcripts. Graduate students must 
have satisfactory GMAT scores, and a satisfactory grade point 
average in the last 60 hours of undergraduate work. Students 
must provide copies of all undergraduate and graduate tran- 
scripts and GMAT results. 



40 Registration 



School of Communication (SOC): Approval must be ob- 
tained for nondegree registration in all SOC courses. 

International Student Registration 

In addition to the registration procedures for continuing or 
new degree smdents, the following steps must be taken by inter- 
national sftidents (smdents who are not U.S. citizens or perma- 
nent residents): 

• All F-1 and J- 1 international students who are enrolling at 
Aniencan University for the first time or for a new program 
are required to bring to Intemational Student & Scholar 
Services ( ISSS) their passport, 1-94, and 1-20, or DS-20 1 9. 

• International students are not required to obtain an 
intemational student advisor's signature to register unless 
they are registering for an internship or cooperative 
education field experience. 

• Intemational students in F- 1 and J- 1 status are required to 
register full-time ( at least 1 2 credit hours for undergraduates 
and 9 credit hours for graduate students) for each semester 
Intemational sUidents with F-l or J-1 visas who intend to 
initially register for less than fi.ill-time credit hours should 
first consult with an international student advisor. 
Intemational suidents who register for less than a full course 
load are required to obtain written permission from ISS 
each term. Failure to do so may result in loss of status. 
Students who fail to register flill-time or fail to provide 
Intemational Student & Scholar Services (ISSS) with 
copies of all required immigration documents as of the first 
day of classes for the semester may be prevented from 
registering and must meet with an intemational student 
advisor in ISSS to have the registration STOP removed. 

• Smdents in B-l/B-2 stams are not eligible to register. For 
more information regarding this DHS regulation, please 
contact the Intemational Smdent & Scholar Services office. 

• Audit courses are not counted toward a fiill course of smdy 
for the purpose of maintaining an F-l or J-1 status. 
Therefore, F-l and J-1 smdents may audit courses only if 
they are registered full-time for courses taken for credit. 

SEVIS: Student and Exchange Visitor System 

Efifective January 30, 2003, universities enrolling F- 1 and J- 1 
smdents are required to report to the DHS any smdent who fails 
to maintain stams or who completes his or her program. Each 
tenn and no later than 30 days after the deadline for registering 
for classes, universities are required to report the following reg- 
istration information: 

1 ) whether the smdent has enrolled, failed to enroll, or dropped 
below a fiill course of smdy without authonzation by Intema- 
tional Smdent & Scholar Services; 

2) current address of each enrolled smdent; 

3) graduation, termination date of smdy, or authorized employ- 
ment. 

Questions concerning DHS regulations should be directed to 
Intemational Smdent & Scholar Services (ISSS), Butler Pavil- 



ion 410; telephone 202-885-3350; fax 202-885-3354. Regular 
office hours are Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Audit Registration 

Note: Intemational smdents in F-l or J- 1 visa status should not 
audit courses. Audit courses are not counted toward a full course of 
smdy for the purpose of maintaining an F-l or J-1 status. 

Smdents who attend a class but do not wish to receive a final 
grade or credit for the course must register as an auditor Tuition 
and fees for auditors are the same as those for smdents register- 
ing for credit. Changes to or fi-om audit must be made before the 
last day to add a course. Audit registration is subject to the same 
regulations as credit registration. Faculty may establish stan- 
dards of class participation and attendance for auditing that must 
be met if a smdent is to remam in audit stams. To register as an 
auditor, choose "Audit" as the grade type when processing your 
registration. 

Internship and Cooperative Education 
Registration 

An internship or cooperative education field experience 
(co-op) is a combination of academic smdy and substantive 
work experience, approved by a supervising faculty member in 
advance. Registration for internships and federal co-ops is open 
to degree smdents in good academic standing. Academic de- 
partments may have additional requirements, but generally the 
prerequisite for registration at the undergraduate level is com- 
pletion of 30 credit hours of course work (12 credit hours for 
transfer smdents) with a minimum grade point average of 2.0; at 
the graduate level, completion of 9 credit hours with a minimum 
grade point average of 3.0. 

All smdents are encouraged to work with an advisor in the 
Career Center For additional information about intemships and 
Cooperative Education, call or visit the Career Center, Butler 
Pavilion 5th floor, 202-885-1804. Information is also available 
at: www. american . edu/careercenter 

Regisn-ation for intemships or co-ops is during the registra- 
tion period for the fall or spring semester or summer session. 
Smdents may add these courses unfil the end of the second week 
of classes in the spring semester or summer session and the third 
week of classes in the fall semester 

Smdents must have met all prerequisites, secured the work 
position, and confirmed their work schedule with their site su- 
pervisor prior to registration. The smdent and supervising fac- 
ulty member must agree upon and document the credit value of 
the field experience, depending on the namre of the academic 
component and the number of hours required for the work com- 
ponent. The recommended standards for academic credit may 
vary but typically are: 8- 1 hours per week for 1 -2 credits; 15-16 
hours per week for 3 credits; and 20-24 hours per week for 6 
credits. Smdents work throughout the tenn ( 1 2 weeks or more). 

Smdents must submit a completed and approved Intern- 
ship/Cooperative Education Registration Form, along with the 
Internship Consent and Release Form to the Registrar's Office. 



Registration 41 



Forms are available at: 

www.american.eduyprovost/registrar/pdf/list.cfTTi . 

Independent Reading and Study 
Registration 

An independent reading course is defined as a course in 
which a student, by arrangement with an instructor, reads a body 
of material with a minimum of formal instruction. An independ- 
ent study project is defined as a course in which a student does 
research on a topic agreed upon by the student and the instructor. 

Enrollment for these courses is during the registration period 
for the fall or spring semester or summer session. Students may 
add these courses until the end of the fourth week of classes in 
the fall and spring semesters or the end of the second week of a 
summer session. 

Before processing registration for these courses, the student 
and the supervising faculty member must agree upon and docu- 
ment the title, objective, scope, and credit value (1-6) of the pro- 
ject to be pursued. The department chair or program director 
must approve the project and faculty member's involvement. In 
particular, he or she must attest that the project does not dupli- 
cate a course already offered in the semester's schedule which 
would be available to the student. 

Students must submit a completed and approved Independ- 
ent Suidy Registration Form to the Registrar's Office. Forms are 
available at: 
vyww.american.edu/provost/registrar/pdfyiist.cfin . 

Community Service Learning Projects 

Undergraduate students may have the opportunity to earn 
credit for community service performed in conjunction with 
courses in which they are enrolled. In addition to at least 40 
hours of approved field work, community service learning pro- 
jects require an academic component related to the course with 
which the service project is associated. Students earn one credit 
for each community service learning project they successflilly 
complete, with a maximum of three credits applied to gradua- 
tion. Only the pass/fail grading option is available. Permission 
of the instructor of the course is required. The Office of Campus 
Life certifies community service organizations and provides ori- 
entation sessions for smdents. for more information on registra- 
tion for Community Service Learning Projects, go to 
vyww.american.edu/ocl/volunteer . 

Consortium Registration 

The Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metro- 
politan Area combines the resources of area universities and col- 
leges. In cooperation with the Catholic University of America, 
Corcoran College of Art, Gallaudet University, George Mason 
University, The George Washington University, Georgetown 
University, Howard University, Marymount University. South- 



eastern University, Trinity College, the University of the Distnct 
of Columbia, and the University of Maryland, American Uni- 
versity offers qualified degree students the opportunity to enroll 
for courses at any of these insfitutions. 

With the appropriate approvals, undergraduate and graduate 
degree sUidents may take courses for AU residence credit at 
member institutions of the Consortium of Universities of the 
Washington Metropolitan Area, provided the course is not of- 
fered at American University. Off-campus courses, courses in 
law and medicine, independent study and reading courses, spe- 
cial institutes, and noncredit courses (except ROTC at 
Georgetown and Howard) are excluded fi'om the consortium. 

To be eligible for this program, students must be fiilly admit- 
ted degree smdents who are actively enrolled and in good aca- 
demic standing. Course registration must be approved by the 
American University dean or department chair of the field of 
smdy for which registration is requested and by the Office of the 
Registrar. Students are responsible for securing approval at the 
cooperating institution when requested. 

American University students pay the American University 
tuition rate. Students registering for consortium courses at all 
universities will be billed for any special fees (such as lab fees) 
for the course. Consortium registration can be confirmed only 
after classes begin at the visited school. 

For course selection eligibility and registration, contact the 
Operations Coordinator for Academic Serv ices in the Office of 
the Registrar at 202-885-2208. Information on the Consortium 
is also available at www.consortium.org. 

Maintaining Matriculation 

Graduate students whose degree requirements are not com- 
pleted and who have not been granted a leave of absence must 
register each fall and spring semester during regular registration 
periods for courses, for thesis or dissertation seminars, or for 
maintaining matriculation. Those who do not will be considered 
as having withdrawn. Such students may then reapply and. if re- 
admitted, are governed by requirements and regulations in effect 
at the time of readmission. 

Dunng a semester when a student is not enrolled in credit 
course work but is utilizing the services of the university (e.g.. to 
prepare for comprehensive examinations or complete research 
for the thesis or dissertation), the student maintains enrolled sta- 
tus by registering for maintaining matriculation, the equivalent 
of one graduate-level credit hour Schools and departments may 
establish specific requirements as to when and for how many se- 
mesters students may be in maintaining matriculation status. 

Students who change degree objective, college, or school, 
whose candidacy for an advanced degree expires, or who 
choose to conform to new regulations or requirements must be 
prepared to complete all requirements and abide by all regula- 
tions in effect at the time such a change is made. 



42 Registration 



Alumni Audit Registration 

Graduates of American University in good financial standing 
with tiie university may enroll in one course each fall, spring, 
and summer semester as alumni auditors. No credit is given for 
courses taken through this program, and courses will not appear 
on student transcripts. Alumni who wish to receive credit for 
courses must register as nondegree students and pay tuition at 
the prevailing rate. Alumni who are also currently enrolled in a 
degree program at AU may participate in the alumni audit op- 
tion, except in courses for their degree program. Alumni audi- 
tors are expected to follow all university conduct policies. 

Alumni audit registration is available during the first two 
weeks of classes for the fall and spring semesters and only for 
courses which have not reached their enrollment limits (no 
"bluecards" are issued for alumni audit registration). 

In-person registration is available at the Alumni Programs of- 
fice, Constimtion Building. Tenley Campus. Registrations may 
also be mailed to Alumni Programs, American University, 4400 
Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016, or faxed to 
202-885-5964. When faxing registration forms, please call 
202-885-5960 to verify receipt of the fax. 

The Alumni Audit fee is $ 1 00, which supports the Alumni 
Scholarship Fund and administrative costs. Some courses may 
also have additional fees. Payment will be accepted by check, 
money order, VISA. MasterCard, Discover, and American Ex- 
press only (no cash). 

Courses not available for Alumni Audit include independent 
study or reading, private music instruction, laboratory courses, 
and maintaining matriculation. 

The following schools and departments require faculty or de- 
partmental approval. If approval is required, the instructor or de- 
partment must sign the authorization section of the registration 
form before the student may register as an alumni auditor 

• School of International Service (SIS), School of 
Communication (SOC), and School of Public Affairs 
(SPA): all courses 

• College of Arts and Sciences (CAS): Anthropology 
(graduate-level courses). Art, Audio Technology, Health 
and Fitness, History (graduate-level courses). Language 
and Foreign Studies, Literature (400-level and 
graduate-level courses). Psychology, and Sociology. 

For additional information, call 202-885-5960 or go to 
www.american.edu/alumni 

For availability of courses, check the Schedule of Classes at 
www.american.edu/provost/registrar/schedule/class.cfrn 



Changes in Registration 

To make changes in registration online, log on to 
myamencan.edu and go to ADD/DROP COURSE. 
Adding Courses 

Students may add a course through the second week of 
classes for the fall or spring, or the equivalent for a summer ses- 
sion. 

In addition to any course prerequisites and required authori- 
zations, approvals are required for the following: 

• Students adding business courses must obtain approval 
from the Kogod School Undergraduate or Graduate 
Program Office. 

• Students adding communication courses must have 
approval from the School of Communication. 

• Cooperative Education students must have worked directly 
with the Career Center and have signed approval. 

Dropping Courses 

Suidents may drop a course through the semester midterm 
date for the fall or spring, or the equivalent for a summer session. 
When a student withdraws from a course during the first two 
weeks of a semester (or the equivalent for summer), the course 
will not appear on the transcript; withdrawal thereafter is noted 
with a "W" in place of a grade. 

Note: Discontinuing attendance in class or notifying an in- 
structor of a status change does not constitute an official action. 

Approvals are required for the following: 

• Withdrawal from courses used to satisfy the University 
Mathematics Requirement requires the approval of an 
academic advisor based on the placement 
recommendations made by the Department of Mathematics 
and Statistics. 

• International students with F-1 or J-1 visas should consult 
fu'st with an international smdent advisor in International 
Student & Scholar Services regarding how to maintain their 
status. 

• Athletes must not drop below 12 credit hours without 
authorization of the director of athletics. 

• Kogod students dropping business courses must obtain 
approval from the Kogod School Undergraduate or 
Graduate Program Office. 

• Cooperative Education students must have prior approval 
from the Career Center. 

Grade Type Option 

Students may change grade type options (A-F or Pass/Fail) 
on the web through the second week of classes for the fall or 
spring, or the equivalent for a summer session. 

Note: Changing grade type is not permitted for courses that 
require a specific grade type, such as Pass/Fail only. 



Registration 43 



Withdrawal from the University 

Degree students who withdraw completely from the univer- 
sity must file an official Withdrawal Request Form though the 
Registrar's Office. Students on academic probation will be re- 
quired to obtain the signature of their academic dean before they 
will be permitted to withdraw. 

Course and Schedule Information 

Course Numbers 

Each course is designated by a subject code and a course 
number TTie subject code identifies a particular academic disci- 
pline or teaching unit in the curriculum; e.g. ANTH = Anthro- 
pology; ECON = Economics; ARTH = Art History. The 
numbers identify the level of the course as follows: 001-099 = 
no degree credit; 100^99 = undergraduate degree credit; 
500-599 = graduate courses to which advanced undergraduate 
students may be admitted; 600-799 = graduate courses to which 
undergraduate students usually are not admitted. 

Courses taken for undergraduate General Education credit 
have a "G"'in the course number, e.g., HIST-IOOG 

Credit Hour Value 

All undergraduate and graduate courses are valued in credit 
hours. Generally, each credit hour is equal to 50 minutes of class 
instruction a week. 

Course Descriptions and Syllabuses 

Descriptions of pemianent courses currently in the university 
curriculum are listed by course number in Course Descrip- 
tions. Catalog course descriptions, as well as selected and rotat- 
ing topics course descriptions are available each semester from 
the Schedule of Classes at 
www.american.edu/provost/registrar/schedule/class.cfrn 

A syllabus describing the general nature and scope of each 
course is available from the department offering the course for 
three years. 

Course Prerequisites 

Many courses call for a minimum background of knowledge, 
as indicated by prerequisite courses cited in individual descnp- 
tions. Titles and numbers are those of American University 
courses; equivalent courses satisfactorily completed at other ac- 
credited institutions also meet prerequisite requirements by 
transfer credit. 

Students are responsible for entering the class with the re- 
quired competence. Thus, prerequisites warn students of the 
knowledge they are to bring with them in order to meet the ex- 
pected standards of performance. 

Class Periods 

Day classes, except those on Wednesday and SaUirday. ordi- 
narily meet two days a week for 75 minutes a meeting. Wednes- 
day classes ordinarily meet once a week for two hours and 30 
minutes. Some classes meet three times a week for 50 or 60 min- 
utes a meeting. Evening classes ordinarily meet once a week for 



two hours and 30 minutes or twice a week for 75 minutes a meet- 
ing. Classes at the 600- and 700-level may, in some cases, meet 
for a total of two hours a week at the discretion of the teaching 
unit concerned. 

Courses involving laboratory, studio, discussion groups, or 
workshops may vary from these schedules. Independent reading 
courses, study projects, intemships, and similar kinds of study 
opportunities meet according to the special arrangement with 
the school, department, or faculty members concerned. 
Cancellation of Courses 

Occasionally it is necessary to cancel a scheduled course be- 
cause of low enrollment, the last-minute unavailability of an in- 
structor, or other unavoidable reasons. Every effort is made to 
announce the cancellation before the first class meeting, but this 
is not always possible. If a course is canceled, a student who 
does not choose to transfer to another course may receive a full 
refiind of the tuition and fees paid for the canceled course by 
completing a refund request form in the Ofllice of Smdent Ac- 
counts. 

Class Attendance 

The university considers class attendance a matter best left to 
the discretion of the individual instructor It is expected, how- 
ever, that faculty members who have a particular attendance 
policy will announce that policy at the first few class meetings 
each semester 

Veterans and others receiving government benefits are re- 
minded that the paying agency may have specific attendance 
policies. 

Emergency Cancellation of Classes 

Classes at American University are expected to meet accord- 
ing to the announced schedule and no instructor is authorized to 
change the day, hour, or place of any meeting. Unless cancella- 
tion of classes is announced publicly, classes will meet. When 
cancellation of classes is necessary, instructors are expected to 
arrange for additional reading, study assignments, or class meet- 
ings to compensate for attendance time lost. 

Student Responsibility 

Students are responsible for their behavior, academic and 
otherwise, at American University. American University ex- 
pects that students, as mature members of the academic commu- 
nity, will adhere to the highest standards of personal and 
academic integrity and good taste. 

To protect their academic status, students should seek the ap- 
propriate approval of their academic program advisors. It is 
highly recommended that students keep their own records of all 
transactions with the university (grade reports, registration 
schedules and changes, incomplete fonns, etc.). 

It is also advisable to keep copies of all tests and papers sub- 
mitted in fiilfillment of course work. 



Academic Regulations 

• Academic Integrity Code 

• Student Academic Grievance Policy 



As part of providing a high-quality education, the university 
continuously exainines its academic requirements. As a result, 
the information contained in this and other sections of this publi- 
cation may be revised. Students should consult their deans or de- 
partment chairs for any new requirements that may affect their 
individual programs of study. 

Academic Integrity Code 

Academic integrity stands at the heart of intellectual life. The 

academic community is bound by a fiindamental trust that pro- 
fessors and students alike undertake and present their work hon- 
estly. As a community of the mind, we respect the work of 
others, paying our intellectual debts as we craft our own work. 

The Academic Integrity Code ("Code") for American Uni- 
versity defines honorable conduct, outlines attendant rights and 
responsibilities, and describes procedures for handling allega- 
tions of academic misconduct. Violating standards of academic 
conduct is a serious matter subject to discipline. Most charges of 
Code violations are brought by the university faculty to the Aca- 
demic Integrity Code Administrator of the major teaching unit 
(School or College) in which the course is taught. 

Violations adjudicated under the Code include the following: 
plagiarism; inappropriate collaboration; dishonesty in examina- 
tions (in-class or take-home); dishonesty in papers; work done 
for one course and submitted to another; fabrication of data; in- 
terference with other students' or scholars' work; bribes, favors, 
and threats; and other academic misconduct. Violations of the 
Code will be treated seriously, with special attention to repeat 
offenders. Sanctions for Code violations may include failure for 
the course, a notation on the student's permanent record, suspen- 
sion and dismissal, as well as other lesser sanctions. Freshman 
Forgiveness does not apply to Code violations. 

By enrolling at American University and then each semester 
when registering for classes, students acknowledge their com- 
mitment to the Code. As members of the academic community, 
smdents must become fami I iar with their rights and their respon- 
sibilities. In each course, they are responsible for knowing the 
requirements and restrictions regarding research and writing, 
examinations of whatever kind, collaborative work, the use of 
study aids, the appropriateness of assistance, and other issues. 
Students are responsible for learning the conventions of docu- 
mentation and acknowledgment of sources. American Univer- 



sity expects students to complete all exaininations, tests, papers, 
creative projects, and assignments of any kind according to the 
highest ethical standards, as set forth either explicitly or implic- 
itly in this Code or by the direction of instnictors. 
The Academic Integrity Code is incorporated in the university's 
Academic Regulations and may be found at: 
www.american.edu/provost/registrar/regulations/reg80.cfin 

Student Academic Grievance Policy 

In the course of academic life, a student may come into dis- 
agreement with a faculty member or with the policies and ac- 
tions of an academic unit as they affect the student's progress 
toward completion of a course or degree. In cases of complaint 
or disagreement over academic matters not resolved by consul- 
tation among the parties, the university provides the student the 
right to initiate a grievance procedure. 

Students should have protection through orderly procedures 
against prejudiced or capricious academic evaluation. At the 
same time, they are responsible for maintaining standards of ac- 
ademic performance established for each course in which they 
are enrolled. Evaluation of students and the awarding of credit 
must be based on academic perfomiance professionally judged 
and not on matters irrelevant to that performance, such as per- 
sonality, physical disability, age, race, gender, sexual orienta- 
tion, religion, national origin, degree of political activism, or 
personal beliefs. 

Judgement regarding standards of evaluation for a student's 
academic performance is a faculty responsibility and is not 
grievable. Normally, only questions relating to whether a faculty 
member complied with the stated requirements of the course 
and applied standards of evaluation fairiy and equitably are po- 
tentially grievable. Cases involving complaints about grades 
will be considered only when there is clear evidence that casts 
significant doubt on the objectivity of the grading process or in- 
dicates that the faculty member failed to comply with the stated 
requirements of the course. 

The university's policy and procedures for consultation and 
informal resolution, formal process, and appeal for student aca- 
demic grievances may be found in Academic Regulation 
50.00.02 at 
www.american.edu/provost/registrar/regulations/reg50.cfin 



44 



Academic Regulations 

• Student Records 

• Grading System 

• Graduation 

• Undergraduate Academic Honors 



Student Records 

A file is maintained for each student who registei^ at Ameri- 
can University. Degree students" records begin in the Admis- 
sions OtTice, which assembles the apphcation and supporting 
documents and the record of admission actions. After an appH- 
cant is approved for admission and registers, the academic his- 
tory is maintained by the Oftke of the University Registrar. 
Normally the only record maintained for nondegree students 
who are citizens of the United States are the record of their regis- 
tration(s) and their academic performance. A full record is kept 
for each international nondegree shident. 

The purpose of the official smdent record is to document the 
smdent's academic career and to provide a repository of infor- 
mation which can be usefiil to advisors. All relevant materials 
are maintained until the student has received the degree or has 
left the university. Periodically, the basic materials in files are 
microfilmed and only the microfilmed copy and the electronic 
permanent record, on which the summary of the total record is 
entered, are retained. 

Information needed for the continuing evaluation of the prog- 
ress of a student, grades earned, and the like are made available 
to the dean by the University Registtar. The various colleges, 
schools, and departments also develop files to aid in the counsel- 
ing and appraisal of their own students. Such files are not, how- 
ever, to be considered otTicial. Important decisions relating to a 
student's academic career should always be based on the infor- 
mation maintained by the Office of the University Registrar. 

The alteration or misuse of official student records, or attempt 
to alter or misuse them, under any circumstances or for any pur- 
pose, will result in the peremptory dismissal of any student or 
employee of the university involved and the institution of such 
legal proceedings as may be appropriate. 

Confidentiality of Student Records 

The university's policy and procedures for confidentiality of 
student records may be found fn Academic Regularion 90. 10.00 
at www.american.edu/provost'registrar/regulations'reg90.cfm . 



The following explains the university's policy for complying 
with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 
("FERPA" or "Act"). Students at American University have the 
following rights regarding their education records: 1 ) to have ac- 
cess to their education records. 2) to consent to release a record 
to a third party. 3 ) to request nondisclosure of directory informa- 
tion, 4) to seek amendment of information in an education re- 
cord which the sUident demonstrates is inaccurate, 5) to be 
notified of their privacy rights, and 6) to file complaints with the 
Family Policy Compliance Office of the U.S. Department of Ed- 
ucation concerning alleged failures by American University to 
comply with the Act. 

For purposes of this policy, the term "student" means any in- 
dividual who is attending or has attended American University 
and for whom the university maintains education records. The 
term "education records" or "smdent education records" means, 
with certain exceptions, any records 1 ) that are directly related to 
a student and 2) maintained by the university or its agents. Stu- 
dent education records are confidential and may only be re- 
leased with consent of the student or as otherwise permitted by 
law. 

The university does not maintain education records in one 
central office. Education records are maintained in the \arious 
departments, schools, or colleges. A smdent should contact the 
Office of the University Registrar, or, for law students, the 
Washington College of Law (WCL) Registrar, for guidance in 
determining which unit(s) a student should contact about an ed- 
ucation record. 

Examples of academic and non-academic student education 
records include without limitation: 

• Academic Records: Permanent record of academic 
performance (e.g., transcript, including supporting 
documents) maintained by the Office of the University 
Registrar, the WCL Registrar, academic advisor, dean's 
office, and Provost's Office: files of academic progress 
maintained by the individual school college academic 
office and Provost's Office; admission files of students; 
Career Center files. 

• Non-Academic Records: Files related to Financial .4id, 
Housing and Dining Programs, Intemational Student and 



45 



46 Academic Regulations 



Scliolar Services. Student Accounts, and the Library; 

student discipline files; employment files of students who 

are employed because of their student status (e.g. 

work-study, graduate assistantship; fellowship). 
Only information directly relevant to the educational pro- 
cesses of the university or which is voluntarily offered by the 
student and accepted fi'om the student shall be included in stu- 
dent education records. 

Specifically excluded from such student education records 
are: 

• Medical and mental health information which is created, 
maintained, or used by a physician, psychiatrist, 
psychologist, or other recognized professional in 
connection with treatment of the student and disclosed only 
to individuals providing the treatment. Such records are 
strictly confidential and not accessible except as provided 
by applicable laws; 

• Sole possession records or private notes maintained by 
individual faculty and instructional, supervisor)', or 
administrative personnel for their own use and which are 
not accessible or released to anyone except a substitute; 

• Records created and maintained by Public Safety solely for 
law enforcement purposes; 

• Employment records of students which are made and 
maintained in the normal course of business, relate 
exclusively to their employment, and are not available for 
use for any other purpose; 

• .Alumni records which contain only information about 
former students after they are no longer smdents at the 
university. 

Student Access to Student Education Records 

Each student may inspect his or her education record, subject 
to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions. A sUident 
must submit a written request to review an education record. 
The request will be granted as soon as possible, but no later than 
forty-five (45 ) days fi-om the date of the receipt of the request. At 
the time of inspection, the student must present identification 
and must inspect the records in the presence of a designated uni- 
versity official. In lieu of inspection and at the request of the sm- 
dent, the university may provide a copy of the requested 
education record. The student may be charged for the actual 
costs of copying the records. The university reserves the right to 
deny requests for copies of records if there is an administrative 
restriction on the individual's student account (e.g. financial ob- 
ligation, disciplinary stop). 

Student may not access the following education records: 

• Financial information submitted by parents; 

• Confidential letters of recommendation for which a student 
has waived the right of access provided that the 
recommendations are used only for their intended purpose 
(i.e. admission, employment, or consideration for any 
honor). However, the student may know the names of all 
people making recommendations; and 



• Confidential letters of recommendation placed in a record 
before January 1 , 1 975. if the letters were used only for the 
intended purpose. 

Disclosures of Student Education Records 

At its discretion, the university may release directory infor- 
mation unless the student has filed a request for nondisclosure of 
directory information with the Office of the University Registrar 
or, for law students, the WCL Registrar. Prior to releasing direc- 
tory information, the university official processing the request 
must contact the Office of the University Registrar to ensure that 
the smdent has not requested nondisclosure of directory infor- 
mation. Directory information includes a sUident's name, tele- 
phone numbers, addresses, e-mail addresses, month and day of 
birth, dates of attendance at the univcrsitv'. major field of study 
and class, date of graduation, degrees and honors received at the 
university, participation in officially recognized university ac- 
tivities, height and weight of members of athletic teams, photo- 
graphs and similar information. 

At its discretion, the university may release directory infor- 
mation for persons requesting such information. In the event 
that the individual seeking verification provides incorrect or in- 
complete information, discretion will be exercised in the 
disclosure of this information. The university, in connection 
with specific events such as commencements, dean's list an- 
nouncements, scholarship presentations, athletic contests, or 
other university-related news stories, may release directory in- 
formation to the news media or the public. TTie university may 
release directory information for law enforcement purposes, and 
will release directory information as required by law. 

Students who object to the disclosure of directory informa- 
tion must notify in writing the Office of the Universitv' Registrar 
or. for law sUidents, the WCL Registrar Fonns for this purpose 
are available fi-om the Office of the University Registrar or the 
WCL Registrar and should be filed within thirty (30) days fol- 
lowing the first day of classes each fall and spring semester The 
request for nondisclosure may be rescinded by written notifica- 
tion to the Office of the University Registrar or the WCL Regis- 
trar In addition, the Registrar will notify students at the 
beginning of each fall and spring semester about the option to re- 
quest nondisclosure of their directory information. 

University officials are determined to have legitimate educa- 
tional interest if the information requested is necessary for that 
official to perform a task that is related to their normally as- 
signed job functions or related to their performance of a contract 
with the university. A "university official" includes faculty, staff, 
a member of the board of trustees, third-parties acting on behalf 
of the university, and individuals, including students, serving on 
university committees. The detemiination as to whether a legiti- 
mate educational interest exists will be made by the custodian of 
the records on a case-by-case basis. 
Third-Party Access to Education Records 

The university may disclose student education records with 
the prior written consent of the student. A student may authorize 



Academic Regulations 47 



access to third parties to review the student's education record by 
completing a wntten and dated authorization form which speci- 
fies the infonnation to be released, the reasons for the release, 
and to whom the information is to be released. 

The university may disclose infonnation in the following cir- 
cumstances without the prior written consent of the student: 

• To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued 
subpoena. Unless otherwise directed by the order or 
subpoena, the university will make a reasonable effort to 
notify the student in writing of the order or subpoena in 
advance of compliance; 

• To the parents of a dependent student, as defined in the 
Intemal Revenue Code. The parent must sign, and provide 
to the university, a written statement confirming that the 
student is a dependent; the statement must be accompanied 
by a copy of the parent's most current tax return which 
reports the student as a dependent; 

• To persons or organizations providing the suident financial 
aid, or who determine financial decisions concerning 
eligibility, amount, conditions, and enforcement or terms of 
the financial aid; 

• To organizations conducting studies for educational 
agencies to I ) develop, validate, or administer predictive 
tests, 2) administer student aid programs; or 3) improve 
instruction. Disclosure under this paragraph shall only be 
made if the study is conducted in a manner that does not 
permit personal identification of students by individuals 
other than representatives of the organization and that 
personally identifiable data will be destroyed when no 
longer needed for the purpose for which it was collected; 

• To authorized representatives of the Comptroller General of 
the United States; Secretary of Education; or state and local 
educational authorities to audit or evaluate a federal or state 
supported education programs, or for the enforcement of or 
compliance with legal requirements of those programs. 
Disclosure under this paragraph shall only be made if 
information is protected in a manner that does not permit 
personal identification of students by individuals other than 
the specified officials and that personally identifiable data 
will be destroyed when no longer needed for the purpose for 
which it is collected. 

• To accrediting organizations for purposes related to 
accreditation of the university; 

• To appropriate parties in a health or safety emergency; 

• To victims of crimes of violence or non-forcible sex 
offenses concerning the results of disciplinary proceedings 
about those incidents; 

• To appropriate parties as permitted by the university's 
Parental Notification of Disciplinary Violations Involving 
the Use or Possession of Alcohol or a Controlled Substance; 
and 

• To appropriate parties in other circumstances as required by 
law. 



Education records will only be disclosed to third parties if 
they are advised not to redisclose the information to others with- 
out the prior written consent of the student or as permitted by 
law. 

Each university office must maintain a list of all individuals 
or organizations who have obtained access to a student's record. 
The list must indicate the legitimate interest that each person or 
organization has in obtaining the infonnation. This "record of 
access" is part of the student's education record. A record of ac- 
cess is not necessary for disclosures: I ) to the student, 2) pursu- 
ant to a written authorization fr^om a student, 3) to university 
officials, 4) of directory infonnation, and 5 ) in response to a sub- 
poena or court order specifying that the existence and/or con- 
tents of such documents may not be revealed. 

Student's Right to Challenge Information in the 
Student Education Record 

If a student demonstrates that the sttident's education record is 
inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the student's 
privacy rights, the student may request in writing that the record 
be changed. TTne request should be made directly to the custo- 
dian of the record. Any disagreement should be resolved infor- 
mally, if possible and within a reasonable time period. If the 
request is denied, the sttjdent may file a written appeal within 30 
days to the University Registrar or, for law students, the WCL 
Registrar. The Registrar will appoint a hearing committee to re- 
view the complaint. The committee will provide the student a 
full and fair opportunity to present evidence. The student may 
be assisted or represented by one or more individuals of the stu- 
dent's choice, including an attorney. After the committee com- 
pletes the proceeding and makes findings, it will render a written 
decision and forward it to the relevant parties for implementa- 
tion. 

Students, dissatisfied with the results of a hearing, may place 
an explanatory statement in the relevant education record com- 
menting upon the infonnation in dispute, and/or setting forth 
any reason for disagreement with the instittitional decision not 
to conect or amend the record. Such a statement will become 
part of the student education record. 

Inactivity of Student Education Records 

After five years since the student has graduated or was last 
registered at the university, the university generally destroys stu- 
dent education records. Exceptions include but are not limited to 
the following: permanent records of academic performance, in- 
cluding supporting dociunents; such financial records as are 
necessary so long as there exists a financial obligation to the uni- 
versity; and disciplinary records that involve a permanent nota- 
tion to the student's record. 



48 Academic Regulations 



Transcripts 

Students may obtain transcripts of their academic records 
from the Office of the Registrar. Transcripts will be released 
only on the signed request or release of the sUident concerned. 

The university will not issue a transcript that reflects only a 
part of the student's record, nor will it make copies of transcripts 
on file from other colleges and universities. 

Certification of Enrollment 

The Office of the Registrar supplies, on request of a currently 
enrolled student, certification of certain academic data concem- 
ing the records and status of the student. These certifications are 
used for Department of Education and scholarship forms, em- 
ployment applications, and so forth. They are not to be confiised 
with transcripts of the student's permanent academic record. 

Grading System 

Calculated in the Grade Point Average: 

Grade Quality Points 

A (Excellent) 4.0 

A- 3.7 

B+ 3.3 

B(Good) 3.0 

B- 2.7 

C+ 2.3 

C (Satisfactory) 2.0 

C- 1.7 

D(Poor) 1.0 

F(Fail) 

X (administrative penalty)* 

*The X grade is assigned by the instructor in lieu of an F 
when a student never attended or ceased attending the class, ren- 
dering an assessment of academic performance impossible. 
Not Calculated in the Grade Point Average: 

I incomplete 

IP in progress 

(for a course for which a grade is not necessarily due at the 
end of the semester, e.g. independent study) 

L auditor (no credit) 

N ... no grade reported by instructor or invalid grade 

P pass 

W withdrawal 

ZF fail on pass/fail option 

ZL administrative withdrawal from audit 

ZX. . . fail (administrative penalty) on pass/fail option 
Grade Point Average 

The cumulative grade point average includes only those 
courses taken for conventional grades (A through F). Courses 
below the 100-level or taken pass/fail are not included in the 
grade point average, nor are grades of Incomplete (I). See also 
Repetition of Courses, below. 

Credit accepted for transfer from another institution is in- 
cluded in the total amount of credit applicable to degree require- 
ments, but grades earned in such courses are not recorded on the 



permanent record at American University and are not used in 
computing the cumulative grade point average needed for grad- 
uation. 

Pass/Fail 

For undergraduate students, the grade of P indicates a quality 
of performance no less than C (2.00) on a conventional grading 
scale. For graduate students, the grade of P indicates perfor- 
mance equivalent to a B (3.00) or better on a conventional grad- 
ing scale. Performance below these levels is reported as ZF. 

Neither the P grade nor the ZF or ZX grade is calculated in the 
grade point average. Degree credit, however, is received with 
the grade of P. 

Incomplete Grades 

At the discretion of the faculty member, the grade of I (In- 
complete) may be given to a student who, because of extenuat- 
ing circumstances, is unable to complete the course during a 
semester The grade of Incomplete may be given only if the stu- 
dent is receiving a passing grade for the course work completed. 
Arrangements for a grade of Incomplete must be made in ad- 
vance of the final examination. An Incomplete Contract form 
detailing what work is to be submitted, the deadlines for such 
submission, and a grade to be substimted for the I should sub- 
mission deadlines not be met is signed by both the smdent and 
the faculty member. The submission deadline should not extend 
beyond the last day of the following semester (not counting 
summer). 

No grade of I will be recognized by the Office of the Registrar 
without the proper documentation. On completion of the re- 
quirements of the course within the time specified in the elec- 
tronic submission of the Incomplete, the grade of I must be 
resolved to a grade of A through F, P, or ZF. Unless resolved by 
the faculty member to one of these grades, the default grade 
specified in the electronic submission of the Incomplete will be 
inserted as a final grade in place of the 1 by the Office of the Reg- 
istrar A W may not be given to remove a grade of I. An I may not 
stand as a permanent grade. 
Changes in Grades 

Once reported, a grade may not be changed except to remove 
a grade of I ( Incomplete) as stated above, or to correct a grade re- 
corded in error To remove a grade recorded incorrectly, the fac- 
ulty member must certify in writing to the Office of the Registrar 
that an error was made. 

Repetition of Courses 

Whenever a course is repeated, each attempt, including the fi- 
nal grade, is entered separately on the permanent academic re- 
cord. Unless specifically indicated to the contrary, however, 
only one successful attempt of a course is counted toward fulfill- 
ment of graduation credit requirements. With the exception of 
the Freshman Forgiveness rule (see the Undergraduate Study 
chapter in this publication), the grades received in all attempts 
are considered in the computation of the undergraduate cumula- 
tive grade point average. 



Academic Regulations 49 



Graduation 

Candidates for degrees submit an Application for Graduation 
form to the Office of the Registrar during the registration period 
for their last expected term of study. Application forms are avail- 
able at: my.american.edu . 

Only after application for graduation has been made can the 
Office of the Registrar begin processing the necessary informa- 
tion for final certification of graduation. Students who fail to 
complete all degree requirements by the end of the term for 
which they applied to graduate must reapply in order to graduate 
later. 
Conferral of Degrees and Commencement 

The university confers degrees and issues diplomas at the end 
of the fall, spring, and summer terms. Formal commencement 
ceremonies are held in May. 



Only students who successfiilly complete degree require- 
ments by the end of the term for which they have applied (or re- 
applied) to graduate are certified for conferral of a degree. In 
wimess of the degree conferred, the permanent records of the 
graduates are appropriately noted with a statement of graduation 
and their diplomas are released. 

Candidates for degrees whose academic records indicate that 
they can satisfy degree requirements by the end of the term for 
which they have applied are permitted to participate in com- 
mencement ceremonies. Participation in a commencement cere- 
mony does not itself constitute conferral of a degree, nor does it 
imply an obligation on the part of the university to award a de- 
gree before all requirements have been met and certified. 



Academic Regulations 

• Graduate Academic Standards and Degree Requirements 



It is university policy that no student shall be involuntanly 
subjected to regulations and academic requirements introduced 
during the student's continuous enrollment in good standing in a 
single degree program if the new regulations involve undue 
hardships or loss of academic credits earned to satisfy the re- 
quirements previously in effect. 

Graduate students are governed by the followdng minimum 
requirements for the graduate degree. Each teaching unit may 
have ftjTther requirements. Graduate students are advised to 
consult their own advisor, department chair, or dean for detailed 
information. 

Academic Load and FuII-Time Status 

The normal load of full-time graduate study is 9 to 12 credit 
hours a semester; however, an academic unit may declare cir- 
cumstances under which full-time involvement in thesis or dis- 
sertation research constitutes full-time standing. 

In summer sessions, because of the combination of six- week 
and seven-week sessions, there are various possibilities for 
full-time standing. Usually, registration for 6 credit hours during 
any session is considered full-time. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 

A graduate student who fails to maintain a 3.00 grade point 
average (on a 4.00 scale) after completion of the first 12 credit 
hours of graduate study may be placed on academic probation 
for one semester, after which the student must achieve and main- 
tain a 3.00 average or be dismissed. A graduate student may be 
placed on academic probation only once. It should be noted that 
the grade point average is only one measure of academic perfor- 
mance. Maintenance of the required average does not necessar- 
ily imply that a student is making satisfactory progress, and the 
university reserves the right to dismiss a student whose perfor- 
mance is judged unsatisfactory' even though the student has 
maintained the required grade point average. A student who is 
dismissed may not be readmitted to the university or enroll as a 
nondegree student for a full year after the effective date of the 
dismissal. ' 



Advancement to Candidacy 

Each academic unit may at its discretion require a formal ad- 
vancement to candidacy and determine the nature of the ad- 
vancement procedure it will use. 

Credit Hour and Residence Requirements 

Master's Degrees 

At least 30 credit hours of graduate work including (a) no less 
than 3 and no more than 6 credit hours of research resulting in a 
thesis (thesis option) or (b) 6 credit hours of graduate work with 
grades of B or better involving a case study, an in-service pro- 
ject, an onginal creative work, specified research courses, or 
such other effort as the academic unit may designate (nonthesis 
option). 

At least 24 of these hours, including the thesis or nonthesis 
option, must be completed in residence at American University. 
Up to 12 credit hours taken in nondegree status at American 
University may be counted toward the degree, or up to 2 1 credit 
hours if earned in a completed graduate certificate program. 

Graduate students may count a maximum of 6 credit hours of 
internship and cooperative education field experience toward 
their degree requirements. The field experience credit hours that 
may be counted toward the requirements for a degree program 
may be fewer, as determined by the academic department, but 
may not exceed the maximum of 6 credit hours. 

Graduate smdents may take graduate-level courses that meet 
with undergraduate-level courses. However, no more than 50 
percent of course work taken in residence (not counting thesis or 
dissertation seminars without regular meetings) may be taken in 
joint graduate-undergraduate courses. 

Doctoral Degrees 

For students admitted to graduate work at American Univer- 
sity without a previously earned master's degree, the require- 
ment is 72 credit hours of graduate study including no fewer 
than 6 and no more than 24 hours of directed study on the disser- 
tation. At least 42 of these hours, including the research require- 
ment, must be completed in residence at American University. 
Up to 12 credit hours taken in nondegree status at American 
University may be counted toward the degree, or up to 2 1 hours 
if earned in a completed certificate program. Course credit 



50 



Academic Regulations 5 1 



earned toward a master's degree at American University may, if 
relevant, be counted toward the Ph.D. degree. 

For students admitted with a master's degree earned previ- 
ously, the requirement is at least 42 credit hours of additional 
graduate work, of which 36 hours, including the research re- 
quirement, must be completed in residence at American Univer- 
sity. 

Graduate students may count a maximum of 6 credit hours of 
internship and cooperative education field experience toward 
their degree requirements. The field experience credit hours that 
may be counted toward the requirements for a degree program 
may be fewer, as determined by the academic department, but 
may not exceed the maximum of 6 credit hours. 

Graduate students may take graduate-level courses that meet 
with undergraduate-level courses. However, no more than 50 
percent of course work taken in residence (not counting thesis or 
dissertation seminars without regular meetings) may be taken in 
joint graduate-undergraduate courses. 
All But Dissertation Master's 

Students who enter a doctoral program without a master's de- 
gree may be awarded the appropriate master's degree by Ameri- 
can University in the field in which their doctoral work is being 
done when they have completed all requirements for the doctor- 
ate except the dissertation. 

Combined Bachelor's and Master's 
Degrees 

American University offers students the opfwrtunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Students can choose fi-om a wide 
variety of established bachelor's/master's programs, or they can 
create bachelor's/master's programs with the approval of the ac- 
ademic department supervising the graduate-level work. Stu- 
dents may complete graduate degrees in disciplines different 
than their undergraduate degrees, provided they are admitted to 
the master's program by the supervising department and they 
have completed the prerequisites required for the graduate 
program. 

A student admitted to a combined bachelor's/master's pro- 
gram (involving tentative admission to graduate standing, so 
that both a bachelor's and master's degree may be eamed as the 
result of a planned program of study) must follow a prescribed 
program of work, and the student's record must show which 
courses will be applied toward the undergraduate degree and 
which courses will be applied toward the master's degree. 

Once admitted to a combined bachelor's/master's program, a 
student may not be denied entry into that master's program if that 
student completes the bachelor's program in good standing and 
meets university and teaching unit minimum standards for ad- 
mission to the master's program involved. 

Students will be admitted to the combined program at nvo 
levels, once for the undergraduate degree and once for the grad- 
uate degree. Each school sets its own admission standards and 



procedures. Tuition and fees will be paid on the basis of the level 
at which the student is currently registered. When the student 
has completed the requirements for a bachelor's degree and has 
been admitted to the graduate portion of the program, mition and 
fees will be charged at the graduate rate. 

The undergraduate student may complete up to 3 credits for 
every 9 credits required for the graduate degree that may be ap- 
plied to the requirements for both degree programs. For exam- 
ple, a student may share up to 9 credits for a 30-hour master's 
degree and up to 12 credits for a 36-hour master's degree. 
Charges will be at the undergraduate rate. The department that 
oversees the graduate program the student enters will determine 
if the courses the undergraduate student completes will satisfy 
master's degree requirements. Departments are not required to 
accept courses that the student completes while he or she is an 
undergraduate. 

In addition to these shared credits, undergraduate students in 
a bachelor's/master's program may be able to reserve a particular 
course so that it counts only toward the master's degree require- 
ments This reserved course work will not count toward the 
bachelor's degree. Any reserved courses do not affect the stu- 
dent's undergraduate GP.A., nor do the credits count toward a 
student's fiill-time enrollment status in a given term. The stu- 
dent's official university transcript will note which courses are 
reserved for graduate credit only. 

Shidents are required to complete the graduation application 
and clearance process once for the bachelor's degree and once 
for the master's degree. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 1 8 in-res- 
idence credit hours at the graduate level after the bachelor's de- 
gree is eamed. This represents a reduction fi-om the established 
requirement of 24 credit hours of in-residence credit for master's 
students. Bachelor's/master's students must maintain continu- 
ous, sequential enrollment in the two programs. Students must 
finish the master's degree requirements within three years from 
the date of first enrollment in the master's program. 

Examinations 

Master's Degrees 

At least one comprehensive examination, the nature and 
scope of which are determined by the academic unit, is required. 

An oral examination on the thesis may be required by the aca- 
demic unit. 

Doctoral Degrees 

At least four comprehensive examinations are required, at 
least one of which must be oral. At least two of the comprehen- 
sive examinations must be written and must be taken within one 
year following the completion of the residence requirement. A 
qualifying examination and master's comprehensive examina- 
tion, if taken at American University, may, at the discretion of 
the academic unit, be credited toward the comprehensive re- 
quirements for a doctoral degree. Comprehensive examinations 



52 Academic Regulations 



given by other institutions will not be credited toward the satis- 
faction of degree requirements. 

An oral examination on the dissertation is also required. 
Examination Timetable 

For both master's and doctoral degree students, the dean or 
department chair (or designated representative) determines the 
time and eligibility for taking the comprehensive, tool, and 
(where required) oral examinations. 

Application to take comprehensive examinations is made to 
the academic unit on a standard fomi available from that office. 
After approval is obtained, the student pays the appropriate fee 
to Student Accounts. In most cases, students should plan to ap- 
ply during the first week of classes of the semester in which they 
plan to take the examinations. 
Examination Fields 

Each college, school, or department offers its current list of 
standard comprehensive examination fields, including certain 
"core" fields and areas in which candidates in particular degree 
programs must present themselves for examination. In some 
disciplines it may be possible to choose an available field out- 
side the major area of study. 

Examination Grading 

Usually each comprehensive written examination is read by 
two readers and is rated "distinction," "satisfactory," or "unsat- 
isfactory" by each. In order to pass the examination, the candi- 
date must obtain at least "satisfactory" from both readers in each 
of the examination fields. In the event of a disagreement in the 
ratings between readers as to whether or not the candidate 
should pass, a third reader is appointed to break the deadlock. 
Each dean or department chair may, however, elect to determine 
a different system of grading comprehensive examinations. Stu- 
dents should consult the specific college, school, or department 
to ascertain what system is used. 

Re-examination 

Comprehensive Examination: A student who fails a com- 
prehensive examination (other than a qualifying examination) 
may be permitted additional attempts within two years. The na- 
ture and extent of the examination to be retaken and the number 
of retakes allowed will be determined by the academic unit. 
Teaching units may establish their own rules for retaking quali- 
fying examinations. 

Thesis and Dissertation Oral Examinations: In the event 
of failure to complete the oral examination satisfactorily, the ac- 
ademic unit may, at its discretion, permit one retake. 

Grade Point Average 

Shidents enrolled in a graduate program must maintain a cu- 
mulative grade point average of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) in 
order to remain in good standing and to graduate. The calcula- 
tion of the graduate cumulative grade point average is specific to 
the program in which a student is enrolled. Only graduate-level 
American University courses that are accepted by the de- 



gree-conferring teaching unit as fiilfilling degree requirements 
are included in the cumulative grade point average. 
Minimum Grades 

No degree credit is earned by a graduate student for any grade 
lower than C (2.00 on a 4.00 scale) received in a graduate-level 
course. However, grades lower than C are used in calculating the 
grade point average. 

Prerequisite Undergraduate Credit 

Credit earned in undergraduate courses taken as required pre- 
requisites for other courses by graduate students may not be 
counted toward satisfying the total credit requirement for a grad- 
uate degree, and grades earned in such courses are not used in 
calculating the student's grade point average. 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

Graduate students who want to pursue an M.A. or M.S. inter- 
disciplinary degree must first be admitted to a school or college. 
In applying for admission, the prospective graduate student 
should alert the faculty of the teaching unit of his or her interdis- 
ciplinary goals. The initiative in formulating an interdisciplinary 
major is left to the student. The student is responsible for secur- 
ing the advice and approval of three faculty advisors, at least one 
from each of the two or more disciplines involved in the interdis- 
ciplinary field, who will help in setting up the program. The stu- 
dent should select one of the three faculty advisors as the 
primary advisor who must be from the admitting school. The 
student, with the assistance of the faculty advisors, must formu- 
late in writing and submit to the office of the dean the following 
items in the approved format and bearing the signatures of all 
three faculty members: 

1 . A statement of the central concept aroimd which the interdis- 
ciplinary major is organized. 

2. An explanation of why existing programs are inadequate to 
the student's purpose. 

3. A list of all proposed courses — major, related, and tool — with 
prerequisites to these courses. Individually designed courses 
must be outlined by the student, after consultation with the fac- 
ulty member 

4. A rationale for the selection of courses. 

5. The title of each standardized comprehensive field, with a ra- 
tionale for selecting it. 

6. A statement of how the 6-hour research requirement is to be 
fiilfilled. If the research requirement is not to be met by a thesis, 
specifics of the nonthesis option must be listed. If the choice is to 
write a diesis, the thesis proposal and names of thesis committee 
members must be specified. 

7. The title of the interdisciplinary program and whether an 
M.A. or M.S. degree is to be awarded upon successfiil comple- 
tion of the program. 

A meeting of all three faculty advisors, the student, and a rep- 
resentative of the dean's office must be held before final ap- 
proval of the major program. Approval or disapproval of an 



Academic Regulations 53 



interdisciplinary major will be given by the dean's office within 
four weeks of receiving the proposal. In accepting the proposal. 
the dean's office certifies that the rules established for interdisci- 
plinary studies have been followed and that courses necessary 
for completion of the program will be available, and it assumes 
administrative responsibility for monitoring the student's prog- 
ress and clearing the student for graduation. 

Leave of Absence 

If a student is unable to pursue course work or to work with 
faculty for a fall or spring semester, the dean of the student's 
teaching unit may authorize a leave of absence for one or two se- 
mesters, during which the student's enrollment status in the de- 
gree program would be maintained. During a leave of absence, 
the student is not entitled to use the ser\'ices of the university. 
Time limitations for completing graduate degrees continue to 
apply during periods when students are on leaves of absence. 
Students may petition for an extension of candidacy at the time 
they apply for a leave or at a later time. Procedures for granting 
leaves of absence may vary among schools and colleges. 

A graduate student taking a leave of absence because of mili- 
tary or government assignment required as a direct result of hos- 
tilities or war, or for incarceration resulting from refusal to 
accept induction under such circumstances, may receive a tui- 
tion refund and have other charges prorated on the basis of the 
number of weeks during which the student was registered for 
classes in a given semester. If a student has completed at least ten 
weeks of a session, he or she may be given fitll credit for any 
course, subject to the approval of the instructor and department 
chair. Additional work may be required. No tuition refund will 
be given for courses for which credit was given. 

A student whose studies are intcmipted for the reasons stated 
above may resume study at American University in the same de- 
gree program, provided he or she returns within a period of six 
months following the completion of duties and provided that the 
degree program in which the student was enrolled is still offered. 
A student who wishes to be enrolled in a different degree pro- 
gram must apply for readmission. 

Maintaining Matriculation 

Graduate students whose degree requirements are not com- 
pleted and who have not been granted a leave of absence must 
register each fall and spring semester during regular registration 
periods for courses, for thesis or dissertation seminars, or for 
maintaining matriculation. Those who do not will be considered 
as having withdrawn. Such students may then reapply and, if re- 
admitted, are govemed by requirements and regulations in effect 
at the time of readmission. 

During a semester when a student is not enrolled in credit 
course work but is utilizing the serv ices of the university (e.g., to 
prepare for comprehensive examinations or complete research 
for the thesis or dissertation), the student maintains enrolled sta- 
tus by registering for maintaining matriculation, the equivalent 
of one graduate-level credit hour. Schools and departments may 



establish specific requirements as to when and for how many se- 
mesters students may be in maintaining matriculation status. 

Students who change degree objective, college, or school, 
whose candidacy for an advanced degree expires, or who 
choose to conform to new regulations or requirements must be 
prepared to complete all requirements and abide by all regula- 
tions in effect at the time such a change is made. 

Statute of Limitations 

Candidates for a master 's degree must complete all degree re- 
quirements no later than three years after the date of first enroll- 
ment in the degree program, except for the M.B.A. degree, 
which must be completed within four years. Candidates for the 
doctoral degree must complete all degree requirements no later 
than five years after the date of first enrollment in the doctoral 
program, or seven years if the doctoral program was entered di- 
rectly from a bachelor's degree. 

A student may petition for an extension of candidacy in a de- 
gree program for a limited period if such extension is sought be- 
fore these time limits expire. In no case may the total amount of 
time granted in extensions of candidacy exceed three years. If, 
however, the time limit has expired, a student may seek readmis- 
sion to the university for a period of no more than three years, 
less any time granted in previous extensions of candidacy. 

Readmission to an advanced degree program may involve 
completing additional courses or other appropriate work. Any 
degree calling for additional undergraduate prerequisite courses 
has the statute of limitations extended for the amount of time re- 
quired to complete them. 

Study at Anotlier Institution 

Once matriculated at American University, a graduate stu- 
dent, may be granted approval to take a maximum of 6 credit 
hours of graduate courses as transfer credit from another accred- 
ited institution. The student must secure advance approval from 
his or her advisor and dean for specific graduate courses by com- 
pleting the Graduate Permit to Study at Another U.S. Institution 
form. Graduate students on a Permit to Study for the fall or 
spring terms must maintain matriculation by registering for at 
least one graduate credit hour at American University. Master's 
degree students must complete a minimum of 24 credit hours in 
residence. Doctoral students must complete a minimum of 42 
credit hours in residence. 

Transfer credit from a Permit to Study is accepted for courses 
with earned grades of B or better Grades for transferred courses 
are not recorded on the American University permanent record 
or computed in the student's grade point average. 

Theses and Dissertations 

Thesis and Nonthesis Options 

For master's candidates, the thesis is expected to demonstrate 
the student's capacity to do original, irtdependent research. 
Some colleges, schools, and departments otTer the opportunity 
to substitute a case study, an in-service project, an original ere- 



54 Academic Regulations 



ative work, or specific advanced research courses in lieu of a 
thesis. In each such case, the thesis seminar or other accepted al- 
temative must be considered part of the residence requirement 
for the master's degree and must meet the standards of the indi- 
vidual college, school, and department as well as those of the 
university. 

No academic credit is given for the master's thesis unless the 
student registers for the thesis seminar. However, a student 
should not enroll for this seminar until ready to start work on the 
formal thesis proposal or the thesis itself Traditionally, an advi- 
sory committee is appointed for each candidate working on a 
thesis. The committee may be composed of no fewer than two 
members, at least one of whom must be a member of the 
Hill-time faculty. An oral examination by this committee is often 
required. Suggestions for revision may be made as conditions 
tliat must be met before members will sign the title page of the 
thesis. If the chair of the thesis committee or the department 
chair certifies failure to complete a satisfactory thesis, the stu- 
dent may be dismissed from the university. 

A student who writes a thesis must adhere to the required 
form and content for the proposal and to the other procedures de- 
scribed in detail in the published guides that may be obtained 
from the office of the dean of the college or school. 

Students electing the nonthesis option should consult the in- 
dividual program descriptions and obtain specific departmental 
requirements from their teaching units. The university mini- 
mum requirement is two research-oriented courses. These 
courses must be completed with grades of B or better. 
Dissertation 

Capping the requirements for the doctorate is the dissertation, 
together with the required oral examination of the dissertation 
by the student's teaching unit. Normally, the candidate must 
have completed all other academic requirements for the degree 
before the oral examination can be held. 

A candidate who is declared ready to proceed to the disserta- 
tion must submit a dissertation topic proposal reporting the re- 
sults of preliminary research. This proposal should contain, 
among other things, a concise statement of the major problem of 
research and of related supporting problems, the data to be used, 
a selected bibliography, a statement of the probable value or im- 
portance of the study, a brief description of the methods to be 
used, and a preliminary outline of the dissertation in some detail. 

After approval of the proposal by the candidate's advisor, it is 
presented to the dean of the college or school for final approval. 
Acceptance of the proposal indicates that the topic is a suitable one 
and that the dissertation will be accepted if developed adequately 
by the candidate. The university will take responsibility for direct- 
ing research only in fields and problem areas that its faculty mem- 
bers feel competent to handle. Acceptance of a dissertation topic 
proposal under no circumstance commits any department or 
school or the university to accept the dissertation itself 

A dissertation advisory committee of three to five persons is 
usually appointed by the candidate's academic dean for each 
candidate undertaking a dissertation. After the draft manuscript 



has received the tentative approval of all members of the com- 
mittee, the committee chair arranges for the oral examination. 
This covers the dissertation itself and the general field of study. 
Conditions to be met before final acceptance of the dissertation 
may be specified without necessarily holding a second oral ex- 
amination. 

Thesis or Dissertation Progress 

It is the collective responsibility of the student, the student's 
advisor, and the student's committee to ensure that satisfactory 
progress is being made on the student's thesis or dissertation. 
The student may request, at least once each semester, that the 
committee meet with him or her to discuss progress. 
Final Manuscript 

Candidates are responsible for being familiar with and com- 
plying with the regulations concerning the form and preparation 
of the final manuscnpt, abstract, copyright, and so forth, which 
may be obtained from the dean or department chair of the teach- 
ing unit off'ering the doctorate. Deadlines are published in the 
Academic Calendar. These must be met if a candidate expects to 
receive a degree at the appropriate commencement. 
Filing of Thesis or Dissertation 

On completion of the final manuscript, a student obtains the sig- 
nature of the department chair and dean on the Thesis/Dissertation 
Completion forra and takes the form and the manuscript to Student 
Accounts to pay the fee. This fee is required for entering into the 
mandatory agreement with University Microfilms. Every thesis and 
dissertation must be microfilmed. The student then proceeds to the 
Olfice of the Registrar for certification of the completion of degree 
requirements, and then to the library tor filing of the manuscript. 
This procedure is to be followed after all other requirements for the 
degree have been satisfied 

Publication 

It is the policy of the university to encourage publication of 
dissertations, case studies, and theses, with acknowledgment to 
the university. If substantial alterations are made before publica- 
tion, this fact must be noted in the prefatory statement that gives 
acknowledgment. 

Tools of Research 

Each academic unit specifies the tool of research require- 
ment. Tools should relate to research in the student's discipline. 
The student's satisfaction of tool requirements is certified by the 
teaching unit, but aid in ascertaining this may be sought outside 
the unit. 

Transfer of Credit 

The university is liberal in accepting credit earned in the past. 
Nonetheless, a student who has not been engaged in formal 
study for a number of years or whose study has been intermit- 
tent, at American University or elsewhere, must understand that 
ftill credit will not necessarily be granted for past work simply 
because it is a matter of record. 



Academic Regulations 55 



The evaluation of graduate work completed elsewhere by an 
entering graduate student, in terms of its applicability' to the pro- 
gram at American University, will be made by the office of the 
dean or department chair concerned no later than the completion 
of 12 credit hours of course work at American University. 

Up to 6 credit hours earned at another institution may be ap- 
plied to a master's degree. Up to 36 credit hours earned at an- 
other institution may be applied to a doctoral degree, including 
30 credit hours for a master's degree earned at another institu- 
tion and 6 credit hours beyond the master's degree. 

For transfer credit, individual courses (that is, courses not part 
of a completed master's program) must ha\ e been completed 
with grades of B or better and must have been completed within 
seven years of the beginning of the semester for which the stu- 
dent is admitted to degree status at American University. In no 
case may graduate credit be given for course work designated as 
undergraduate by the offering institution. 

See also Credit Hour and Residence Requirements, or 
consult the individual department for further details. 

Transfer of Credit from One American Universitj' 
Advanced Degree to Another 

A student may transfer 6 credit hours from one master's de- 
gree earned at American University to another master's degree 
to be completed at American University (see the dual master's 
degrees option, below, for two master's degrees eamed simulta- 
neously ). A suident pursuing a second doctoral degree at Ameri- 
can University may transfer a total of 36 credit hours from one 
doctoral degree to another However, the student must complete 
an additional 36 credit hours of graduate work in residence in 
that new doctoral degree program. 

In all cases students are required to meet the residency re- 
quirements established by the university and any fiirther resi- 
dency requirements which may be stipulated for each program 
by the individual departments. 



Dual Master's Degrees Option 

In the case of simultaneous appmved registration in two mas- 
ter's degree programs, additional courses may be counted to- 
ward both degrees. The student must meet the admission criteria 
for each of the degrees and must be admitted separately to each 
degree program. The student must be admitted to the second 
program before completing the first. Admission to one degree 
program does not guarantee automatic admission to a second; 
each admission decision is separate and conducted according to 
established procedures for the particular degree. 

All the course and other requirements for each degree pro- 
gram must be met, including the thesis or non-thesis research 
option for each degree. Students must complete at least 48 credit 
hours in residence at American University with at least 24 cred- 
its unique to each degree. Individual departmental requirements 
may demand more than 24 credit hours for either or both de- 
grees. Courses used to satisfy requirements for an undergraduate 
degree may not also be used to satisfy requirements for dual 
master's degrees. 

The details of a student's dual master's degrees program must 
be approved by the department chair/degree program director 
and the dean or designee for each of the two degrees. Candidates 
for dual master's degrees must submit a formal petition to the di- 
rectors of each master's program before the conferral date of the 
first degree. Students apply for and receive each degree upon 
completion of all the requirements for that degree. The degrees 
may or may not be completed simultaneously. 



Academic Regulations 



• Undergraduate Academic Standards and Degree Requirements 

• Undergraduate University Degree Requirements 



Academic Load 

An undergraduate student admitted to and enrolled in a de- 
gree program usually registers for 1 5 credit hours each semester 
so that the required minimum of 1 20 credit hours for the bache- 
lor's degree is completed in four years. 

In any given semester, a student may carry a minimum of 1 2 
credit hours and be classified and certified (for veteran's bene- 
fits, financial aid. etc.) as full-time for that semester. The addi- 
tional credit hours must be made up through summer enrollment 
or by an overload (if approved by the dean) in another semester 
in order to maintain nonnal annual progress toward the degree, 
as is often required by the regulations of government agencies. 
Snidents are urged to become familiar with such regulations. A 
total of 19 credit hours is the maximum load permitted without 
special approval. 

An undergraduate student wishing to register for more than 
1 9 credit hours in a semester is required to have the appro\ al of 
the academic advisor and the appropriate dean. The approval is 
for the overload, not permission for a specific course. A 
per-credit-hour tuition fee is assessed, in addition to the full-time 
tuition fee, for registered credit hours over seventeen. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 

An undergraduate student who fails to maintain the academic 
average required by the university and'or fails to make satisfac- 
tory progress toward a degree is subject to dismissal. A student 
who does not fulfill these criteria but who gives evidence of 
probable substantial improvement may. under certain circum- 
stances and the discretion of the student's dean, be placed on ac- 
ademic probation for a specified period of time in lieu of being 
dismissed. 

An undergraduate student who fails to maintain a 2.00 cumu- 
lative grade point average (GPA) during the first semester of 
hall-time study (or the equivalent in part-time study ) is subject to 
academic probation or dismissal. A student whose cumulative 
GPA after attempting or completing 24 credit hours (excluding 
courses in which the recorded grade is W) falls below 1.00 will 



be dismissed. A shident whose cumulative GPA is at any time 
between 1 .00 and 2.00 may be dismissed or, at the discretion of 
the student's dean, placed on academic probation. 

A student on probation may be subject to restrictions as to the 
course load for which he or she may register and is ineligible to 
hold office in student organizations or to participate in intercol- 
legiate activities. The sUident may be given permission to partic- 
ipate in intercollegiate athletics at the end of a semester in which 
the saident's cumulative GPA is raised to 2.00. even though the 
student's probation may extend for an additional semester. With 
permission of the student's dean, a student may complete the 
season of any collegiate sport in which he or she is participating 
at the time the student's cumulative GPA falls below 2.00. 

Probationary and dismissal actions are made by the colleges 
and school each January, June, and .August based on the stu- 
dent's academic performance. Students on academic probation 
are informed in writing of their status, the period of probation, 
and any conditions imposed by the student's dean. 

A smdent who is dismissed may not be readmitted to the uni- 
versity or enroll as a nondegree shident for a full calendar year 
after the effective date of the dismissal. 

Actions involving academic probation and dismissal are en- 
tered on the student's permanent record and may not be re- 
moved. 



Changes in Field of Study 

A student who wishes to change from one college or school to 
another, or from one major to another, must receive the permis- 
sion of the dean or department chair in charge of the program to 
which the student wishes to transfer. A change in college, 
school, or major affiliation, when approved, may not become ef- 
fective until the beginning of the next semester. It does not be- 
come effective if the student is suspended or dismissed, A 
student who changes a field of study may lose credit already 
earned in other shidy that is not appropriate to the new program. 



Sfi 



Academic Regulations 57 



Class Standing 

Undergraduate class standing is defined as follows: 



Credit Hours 
Completed 



Standing 



0-29 

30-59 

60-89 

90 or above 



Freshman 

Sophomore 

Junior 

Senior 



It is university policy that no student shall be involuntarily 
subject to regulations and academic requirements introduced 
during the student's continuous enrollment in good standing in a 
single degree program if the new regulations involve undue 
hardships or the loss of academic credits earned to satisfy the re- 
quirements previously in effect. 

Undergraduate students are governed by the following mini- 
mum requirements for the undergraduate degree (each teaching 
unit may have further major and major-related requirements). 
Undergraduate students are advised to consult their own advisor, 
department chair, or dean for detailed information. 

Credit Hour and Residence Requirements 

Associate Degree 

The Associate in Arts degree requires the completion of at 
least 60 credit hours. At least 24 of the last 30 credit hours ap- 
plied to die degree must be taken in residence at American Uni- 
versity. A maximum of 36 credit hours may be transferred to the 
degree. 

Students must complete at least 24 hours of courses in the 
General Education Program including one foundation course in 
each of the five curricular areas and one second-level course in 
each of three of the five curricular areas. Students must also fiil- 
fill the College Writing and English Competency Requirement 
and the University Mathematics Requirement. 
Bachelor's Degrees 

The university offers the following bachelor's degrees: 
Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.), Bache- 
lor of Science (B.S.), and Bachelor of Science in Business Ad- 
ministration (B.S.B.A.). 

All bachelor's degrees require completion of at least 120 
credit hours of course work. At least 45 credit hours out of the 
last 60 must be completed in residence at American University. 
A minimum of 1 5 credit hours must be completed at American 
University in upper-level courses in the student's major. A maxi- 
mum of 75 hours may be transferred towards a bachelor's de- 
gree. Credit eamed in any American University course, on or off 
campus, is residence credit. Credit eamed by an American Uni- 
versity student through the Consortium of Universities of the 
Washington Metropolitan Area is also residence credit. 

Within the total 120 credit hours, students must ftjlfill a 
6-credit-hour College Writing and English Competency Re- 
quirement, a 3-credit-hour University Mathematics Require- 



ment, the General Education Requirement, and requirements for 
a major. 

Undergraduates may count a maximum of 1 2 credit hours of 
internship and cooperative education field experience toward 
the 1 20 minimum credit hours required for graduation. The field 
experience credit hours that may be counted toward the require- 
ments for a major or minor program may be fewer, as deter- 
mined by the academic department, but may not exceed the 
maximimi of 12 credit hours. 
Two Undergraduate Degrees 

A student who fulfills all the requirements for two bachelor's 
programs (including major, major-related, and residence re- 
quirements) and earns a total of 150 credit hours may be 
awarded two bachelor's degrees. 

In order to be eligible for the second bachelor's degree, the 
student must apply for admission to the second degree program, 
preferably by the end of the junior year. If the student is granted 
admission to the second program, then upon completion of all 
requirements for the first program and the award of the first de- 
gree, the student's status will be changed to the second program. 
The student must again apply for graduation to be granted the 
second bachelor's degree. 

Combined Bachelor's and Master's 
Degrees 

American University offers sUidents the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Students can choose from a wide 
variety of established bachelor's/master's programs, or they can 
create bachelor's/master's programs with the approval of the ac- 
ademic department supervising the graduate-level work. Stu- 
dents may complete graduate degrees in disciplines different 
than their undergraduate degrees, provided they are admitted to 
the master's program by the supervising department and they 
have completed the prerequisites required for the graduate pro- 
gram. 

A student admitted to a combined bachelor's/master's pro- 
gram (involving tentative admission to graduate standing, so 
that both a bachelor's and master's degree may be eamed as the 
result of a planned program of study) must follow a prescribed 
program of work, and the student's record must show w hich 
courses will be applied toward the undergraduate degree and 
which courses will be applied toward the master's degree. 

Once admitted to a combined bachelor's/master's program, a 
student may not be denied entry into that master's program if that 
smdent completes the bachelor's program in good standing and 
meets university and teaching unit minimum standards for ad- 
mission to the master's program involved. 

Students will be admitted to the combined program at two 
levels, once for the undergraduate degree and once for the grad- 
uate degree. Each school sets its own admission standards and 
procedures. Tuition and fees will be paid on the basis of the level 
at which the student is currently registered. When the student 



58 Academic Regulations 



has completed the requirements for a bachelor's degree and has 
been admitted to the graduate portion of the program, tuition and 
fees will be charged at the graduate rate. 

The undergraduate student r^iay complete up to 3 credits for 
every 9 credits required for the graduate degree that may be ap- 
plied to the requirements for both degree programs. For exam- 
ple, a student may share up to 9 credits for a 30-hour master's 
degree and up to 12 credits for a 36-hour master's degree. 
Charges will be at the undergraduate rate. The department that 
oversees the graduate program the student enters will determine 
if the courses the undergraduate student completes will satisfy 
master's degree requirements. Departments are not required to 
accept courses that the sUident completes while he or she is an 
undergraduate. 

In addition to these shared credits, undergraduate students in 
a bachelor's/master's program may be able to reserve a particular 
course so that it counts only toward the master's degree require- 
ments This reserved course work will not count toward the 
bachelor's degree. Any reserved courses do not affect the stu- 
dent's undergraduate GP.A., nor do the credits count toward a 
student's ftill-time enrollment status in a given term. The stu- 
dent's official unixersity transcript will note which courses are 
reserved for graduate credit only. 

Students are required to complete the graduation application 
and clearance process once for the bachelor's degree and once 
for the master's degree. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 1 8 in-res- 
idence credit hours at the graduate level after the bachelor's de- 
gree is earned. This represents a reduction from the established 
requirement of 24 credit hours of in-residence credit for master's 
students. Bachelor's/master's students must maintain continu- 
ous, sequential enrollment in the two programs. Students must 
finish the master's degree requirements within three years from 
the date of first enrollment in the master's program. 

Grade Point Average 

Students enrolled in an undergraduate degree program must 
maintain a grade point average of at least 2.00 in order to remain 
in good standing and to graduate. 

Evaluation of Progress 

An evaluation of each undergraduate student's progress is 
made by the office of the student's dean after each semester. In 
addition to the cumulative grade point average, this evaluation 
considers completion of all university requirements and the ratio 
of courses satisfactorily completed to all courses attempted by 
the student. Students who are not making satisfactory progress 
are informed in writing of the result of their evaluation and of- 
fered academic advising. 

The university has no strict regulations governing the total 
amount of time an undergraduate student may take to ftilfill the 
requirements for a degree, provided the student maintains the 
appropriate grade point average and gives evidence of being se- 
riously interested in the eventual achievement of his or her aca- 
demic objective. 



Freshman Forgiveness 

A freshman who, during the first two semesters of hill-time 
study, receives a grade of F or X in a course may repeat the 
course at American University within the calendar year thereaf- 
ter, or in the next two regular semesters in which the student is 
enrolled. If the course is not offered within that time, the student 
may use the option the next time it is offered. No grade is re- 
mo\ ed from the student's record, but only the grade eamed the 
second time the course is taken is used in calculating the grade 
point average for purposes of making decisions concerning pro- 
bation, dismissal, and required average for graduation. 

A part-time undergraduate or nondegree student who. during 
the first 30 credit hours of study, receives a grade of F in a course 
may repeat the course at American University within one calen- 
dar year after the semester in which the grade of F was received, 
with the resulting cumulative index benefits stated above. 

The freshman forgiveness mie does not apply to transfer stu- 
dents even though they may have entered the university with 
freshman status. 

Graduate Credit 

Senior students, with the written permission of their depart- 
ment chairs or deans, may enroll in specifically approved gradu- 
ate courses not required for their undergraduate programs. Such 
courses must be designated in writing as graduate-degree credit 
at the time the student registers for them. A copy of this written 
agreement must be filed in the Office of the Registrar. Retroac- 
tive application of these credits for such purposes is not permit- 
ted. Credit for these courses may be applied toward meeting the 
course requirements for a graduate degree after the student has 
been awarded an undergraduate degree if the student is then ad- 
mitted to a graduate degree program. 

Leave of Absence 

Undergraduate students desiring a leave of absence for rea- 
sons other than study at another collegiate instiRition should re- 
quest an appointment with their dean. If it seems desirable to 
guarantee the student an automatic readmission. the dean will is- 
sue a permit for leave of absence. This pemiit will specify a limi- 
tation, one year at most, of automatic readmission to the same 
undergraduate program. 

The pemiit becomes void if the student attends any domestic 
or foreign collegiate institution during the period of leave. In 
such instances, the student must obtain a permit to study at an- 
other institution before leaving American University. 

Major Requirements 

Each undergraduate must complete at least 36 credit hours in 
the degree major and related courses, no fewer than 1 5 of which 
must be eamed in upper-level courses taken in residence at 
American University. 

A grade of C (2.00) or better is required for each major, ma- 
jor-related, or minor course. Smdents should note that a C- does 



Academic Regulations 59 



not qualify and any course with a C- or lower will have to be re- 
peated or an equivalent course taken to satisfy the major require- 
ment involved. Courses in the major may be taken on a pass/fail 
basis only with permission of the student's dean or department 
chair. 
Declaration of Major 

By the end of the sophomore year, if not before, each student 
must choose and formally declare an academic major 

Admission to the university in an undergraduate program 
does not automatically constiuite admission to a major program. 
Acceptance is official only when specific approval has been 
granted by the department chair or program director. 
Multiple Majors 

A student may complete multiple majors by satisfactorily 
passing the major and major-related course work required by the 
departments or schools. 

If the majors are pursued in different schools, the student 
must designate when declaring the majors which school he or 
she will be enrolled in and graduated from. The student will need 
to satisfy the general requirements of that school only. If a stu- 
dent is majoring in recognized majors that lead to different de- 
grees (e.g.. B.A. and B.S.). the student specifies which of the 
degrees is to be awarded. A student may apply the same course 
to each major program in which it meets the requirements. 

Interdisciplinary Majors 

In addition to the established major programs, students have 
the option of constructing their own major programs leading to a 
B.A. or B.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies. To design and com- 
plete an interdisciplinary major, a student must have the ap- 
proval of three faculty members v\ho represent the various 
disciplines involved in the interdisciplinary field. Tlie major ad- 
visor must be a full-time faculty member TTie student applies for 
permission to undertake an interdisciplinary major to the dean of 
the school or college in which he or she is enrolled. If the focus 
of the interdisciplinary program makes a change of college or 
school affiliation advisable, the student must follow the proce- 
dures for changes in fields of study. 

Interdisciplinary major programs must include a total at least 
42 credit hours with grades of C or better, including 36 credit 
hours selected to form an academically sound, unified, and 
well-defined program, and 6 credit hours in independent study 
or senior seminars supervised by the major advisor and focused 
on the program's central concept. With pnor approval, an appro- 
priate internship or advanced level course may be substituted for 
all or part of the 6-credit hour independent study. 

At least 75 percent of the 36 credit hours must be upper-level 
as defined by the teaching units that oft'er them. Suidents are en- 
couraged to include at least two 500-level courses, although in 
some areas this may not be possible. A maximum of 18 credit 
hours of work completed prior to the semester in which applica- 
tion is made may be included in the program. 

Students must have at least a 2.50 grade point average (on a 
4.00 scale) to be accepted. All arrangements should be com- 



pleted by the end of the first semester of the junior year, except 
by special permission of the appropriate dean, and no earlier 
than the second semester of the freshman year 

The student must submit a completed Interdisciplinary 
Studies Major Program Form, with required attachments and 
bearing the signatures of the major advisor and the two sponsors, 
to his or her dean. Information submitted must include the fol- 
lowing: 

1 . A statement of the central concept of the major and an expla- 
nation of its interdisciplinary character. 

2. A statement demonstrating that existing programs do not sat- 
isfy educational needs or vocational goals of the student. 

3. An outline of the academic requirements of the major, includ- 
ing a list of all required courses and a tentative schedule for their 
completion. Individually designed courses must be outlined. 

4. A Declaration of Major Form, which must specify the name of 
the major and whether a B.A. or a B.S. degree is to be awarded 
upon successful completion of the program. 

In accepting the proposal for an interdisciplinary major, the 
dean's office certifies that the rules established for interdisciplin- 
ary studies have been followed and that courses necessary for 
completion of the program will be available, and assumes ad- 
ministrative responsibility for monitoring the student's progress 
and clearing the student for graduation. 

Minors 

Specific course requirements for minors are listed under de- 
partmental programs. .Ml minor programs consist of a minimum 
of 18 credit hours, including at least 9 credit hours at the 300 
level or above. For all minors, at least 9 credit hours of the stated 
requirements must be taken in residence at American Univer- 
sity. At least 1 2 credit hours of the minor must be outside of the 
course requirements for each major the suident is pursuing. A 
grade of C (2.00) or better is required for each course used to sat- 
isfy the requirements of a minor 

Students should consult with their advisors as to the proce- 
dure for declaring a minor Minors are noted as a comment on 
the student's permanent record at the time of graduation, but will 
not appear on the student's diploma. 
Interdisciplinary Minors 

In addition to established minors, students have the option of 
constructing their own minor programs. To design and complete 
an interdisciplinary minor, a student must have the approval of 
uvo faculty members v,ho represent the disciplines involved. In- 
terdisciplinary minors must include a total of 24 credit hours 
with grades of C or better, including at least 9 credit hours at the 
300 level or above, selected to form an academically sound, uni- 
fied, and well-defined program. For all minors, at least 9 credit 
hours of the stated requirements must be taken in residence at 
American University. At least 1 2 credit hours of the minor must 
be outside of the course requirements for each major the student 
is pursuing. 



60 Academic Regulations 



Pass/Fail 

Students may take up to 50 percent of their courses on a 
pass/fail basis. If a student's major department approves, this 
percentage may be greater. Courses in the student's major must 
be taken for a letter grade unless special pemiission is given by 
the dean or department chair. The grade of P (pass) is not used in 
calculating the grade point average. (For more information, see 
the Academic Information and Regulations chapter.) 

Resuming Study 

Students who cease to attend the university for an entire se- 
mester, whether voluntarily or not, may not resume study until 
they have been readmitted. Readmitted students are subject to 
all regulations and must meet all requirements in force when 
studies are resumed unless other arrangements have been agreed 
to in writing by the student's dean before the beginning of such 
an absence. 

Students who change degree objective, college, or school, or 
who choose to conform to new regulations or requirements, 
must be prepared to complete all requirements and abide by all 
regulations in effect at the time such a change is made. 

Study at Another Institution 

Study at another institution is usually undertaken during the 
summer or as part of an study abroad program. Once matricu- 
lated at American University, snadents may have up to 6 credit 
hours transferred only from institutions accredited for granting 
bachelor's or higher degrees. 

An enrolled student who plans to take courses at another col- 
lege or university for transfer credit to American University 
must be in good academic standing and must receive prior ap- 
proval from the student's department chair and dean using the 
Permit to Study Abroad form or the Permit to Study at Another 
U.S. Institution form. For study abroad, approval is also required 
from the AU Abroad director. If the course to be taken is outside 
the area of the student's major, the chair of the department which 
would offer credit for such a course must also approve the per- 
mit. Approval is granted for specific courses. Permits to Study 
may not be authorized for courses at community colleges or 
non-accredited four year institutions. 

The visited institution, if in the United States, must be region- 
ally accredited. With departmental approval, transfer credit is 
applicable toward the requirements of a major. Transfer credit 
may be used to fiilfill General Education Requirements through 
the evaluation of equivalent courses taken at another institution 
and with the approval of the student's dean. Because of the spe- 
cial nature of the program, after the student has been admitted to 
American University no credit toward General Education Re- 
quirements may be earned through transfer credit. 



Study Abroad 

American University offers numerous study abroad pro- 
grams through the AU Abroad Program. Students may also par- 
ticipate in study abroad programs offered by other institutions 
that are part of a regionally accredited U.S. college or university, 
and are recorded on the transcripts of those instimtions. For de- 
termination of regional accreditation, the publication Credit 
Given is the accepted reference. 

After consultation with and approval of the student's dean 
and the AU Abroad director, application is made directly to the 
institution for admission to its foreign study program. Transfer 
credit will be granted on the basis of the transcript from the spon- 
soring U.S. college or university. 

Students may also attend institutions abroad not affiliated 
with an American college or university. Requests for transfer 
credit must be made on a Permit to Study Abroad form and must 
be approved before the student registers at the foreign institu- 
tion. The institution to be visited must be approved by the stu- 
dent's dean and the AU Abroad director. The student's dean and 
academic advisor review the official transcript when the student 
returns to confirm course approval, and forward the transcript 
and evaluation to the Office of the Registrar for transfer of ap- 
proved credit. The student's academic advisor and dean also ap- 
prove the academic areas or specific courses of study. 

Students who complete the Permit to Study Abroad form and 
enroll in an non-AU study abroad program are required to pay 
the Permit to Study Abroad fee for each semester, including 
summer, they are registered. 

Transfer of Credit 

The Admissions Office evaluates official documents show- 
ing previous college-level work completed. Individual teaching 
units determine how this credit will apply to specific degree pro- 
grams. 

Grades and quality points eamed in courses accepted for 
transfer will not be included in the grade point average to be 
maintained at American University, but the credits will count to- 
ward the total number required for graduation. 

Transfer students may normally expect to receive credit for 
courses taken at collegiate institutions that were, at the time the 
courses were taken, regionally accredited or recognized candi- 
dates for accreditation. These courses must be appropriate for 
academic credit at American University towards an undergradu- 
ate degree program. A ma.\imum of 75 credit hours will be ac- 
cepted on transfer from four-year collegiate institutions. A 
ma.\imum of 60 credit hours will be accepted from two-year col- 
legiate institutions. A maximum of 75 credit hours from all insti- 
tutions of higher education may be transferred toward a 
bachelor's degree. 

A maximum of 30 credit hours will be accepted on transfer 
for a combination of relevant work completed satisfactorily in 
college-level Armed Services School courses, U.S. Armed 
Forces Institute correspondence or extension courses, or any 
Military Occupational Skills (MOS) courses completed with a 



Academic Regulations 61 



grade of 70 or better, as recommended at the baccalaureate level 
by the American Council on Education and which is appropriate 
for academic credit as determined by the Admissions Office af- 
ter consultation with the appropriate academic unit. 

A maximum of 30 credit hours may be granted for a combina- 
tion of relevant work completed in college-level nondegree, cor- 
respondence or extension courses completed at an accredited 
institution provided the course work is recognized by that insti- 
tution for credit toward a degree, and is appropriate for academic 
credit as determined by the Admissions Office after consultation 
with the appropriate academic unit. 

Transfer students may be awarded credit for satisfactory 
scores in subject examinations of the College Level Examina- 
tion Program (CLEP). Students may not receive credit for a sub- 
ject examination if a course comparable in content has been 
accepted in transfer by the university, or if the student failed such 
a course (see Advanced Standing, below). Official score reports 
must be sent directly to the Admissions Office from the Educa- 
tional Testing Service. No transfer credit towards the General 
Education requirements may be earned once the student has ma- 
triculated at American University. 
Advanced Standing 

Up to 30 credit hours will be accepted from one or a combina- 
tion of Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate, 
and CLEP subject examinations. Upon recommendation of the 
appropriate teaching unit, advanced standing may be awarded 
or a course requirement waived for an entering student on the 
basis of performance in the Advanced Placement Examination 
Program of the College Entrance Examination Board, the 
Higher Level subjects of the International Baccalaureate Pro- 
gram, or successfijl performance in the Subject Examination 
Program of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). 

All undergraduate students in a degree program are eligible 
for course credit, with advanced placement where appropnate. 
on the basis of performance on the CLEP subject examinations, 
if the student has not failed or completed a credit-bearing course 
comparable in content. 

Course credit, with advanced placement where appropriate, 
will be assigned for successful performance in the Subject Ex- 



amination Program of CLEP, contingent upon the specification 
of norms and upon approval of the appropriateness of the con- 
tent of the examinations by the teaching unit concerned. Se- 
lected CLEP examinations may be applied to up to four courses 
to meet General Education requirements (see below). Credit to- 
ward General Education requirements may be awarded only for 
examinations taken prior to entering American University. Un- 
der no circumstances will students be permitted to re-take a sub- 
ject examination. 

Students should consult with their advisors as to how exami- 
nations will apply to their degree programs. Information on reg- 
istering for CLEP subject examinations may be found at: 
www.collegeboard.org clep . 

The following are CLEP Subject Examinations accepted by 
American University for the 2009-10 academic year: 

American Government (AU course equivalent 

GOVT- 110*) 
American Literature 
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature 
Biology 
Calculus 
French Language 
German Language 
Spanish Language 

Information Systems and Computer Applications 
Infroduction to Educational Psychology 
English Literature 
Chemistry (AU course equivalent CHEM-1 10 and 

CHEM-210*) 
Infroductory Psychology 
Human Growth and Development 
Principles of Management 
Principles of Marketing 
Principles of Macroeconomics (AU course equivalent 

ECON-100*) 
Principles of Microeconomics (AU course equivalent 

ECON-200*) 
Introductory Sociology (AU course equivalent 

SOCY-210*) 
* course equivalents for General Education credit 



Undergraduate University Degree Requirements 



College Writing and English Competency 
Requirement 

All students must be able to write in English with a level of 
mastery equivalent to the demands of college course work. In 
addition, students need to acquire the critical reading skills 
needed for all their college courses. 

Students satisfy the College Writing and English Compe- 
tency requirement by taking one of the required 6-credit course 
sequences listed below during the freshman year. Students must 



achieve a grade of C or better Nonnati\ e and native speakers of 
English must meet the same requirements: 

• LIT- 1 00 College Writing and 
LlT-101 College Writing Seminar 

• LIT- 1 02 College Writing and 
LIT- 103 College Writing Seminar 

(for sUidents who need extra work on language skills) 

• LIT-130 Honors English I a/ifi 
LIT-131 Honors English II 



62 Academic Regulations 



The College Writing and English Competency requirement 
may also be satisfied through: 

• Advanced Placement English Test score of 4 or 5. 

• Transfer students who present 6 hours of acceptable 
composition credit from another institution satisfy the 
College Writing and English Competency requirement by 
passing the English Competency Examination. Transfer 
students who present 3 hours of acceptable composition 
credit from another institution may satisfy the College 
Writing requirement by passing the course in the College 
Wnting sequence for which they have not been given credit 
with a C or better 

In those cases when a competency examination is required. 

students failing the exam twice must enroll m LIT- 180 

Writing Workshop and must pass the course with a grade 

of C or better. 

The English Competency Examination is administered by 
the College Writing Program in the Department of Literature. 
Smdents who do not pass the examination may schedule a meet- 
ing with a writing consultant in the Wnting Center who will re- 
view the smdent's exam, explain the deficiencies, and offer 
counsel about additional work on writing skills through courses. 
Writing Center tutorials, or independent smdy. A preparation 
packet for the examination, including a practice exam, is avail- 
able at the Department of Literature. Battelle 237 or the Writing 
Center, Battelle 228. For more information about the exam, con- 
tact the director of the College Writing Program at 
202-885-39 1 1 . To schedule an appointment at the Writing Cen- 
ter, call 202-885-299 1 . Nonnative and native speakers of Eng- 
lish must meet the same requirements, although nonnative 
speakers are afforded extra time to complete the English Com- 
petency Examination. 



University Mathematics Requirement 

All students must demonstrate skills in mathematics and 
quantitative reasoning at the college level. Students who do not 
satisfy this requirement by examination as specified below must 
enroll in an appropriate mathematics course before the comple- 
tion of 30 credits at American University and must continue to 
enroll each semester until the requirement is satisfied. After stu- 
dents have matriculated at American University, no credit to- 
ward the University Mathematics Requirement may be earned 
through transfer credit. Students meeting the requirement 
through course work must receive a C or better The University 
Mathematics Requirement may be satisfied in one of the follow- 
ing ways: 



• Earning a grade of C or better in any American University 
mathematics course at the level of MATH-15X Finite 
Mathematics or above or any American University 
statistics course in the Department of Mathematics and 
Statistics. 

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics will 
recommend placement of stadents in mathematics courses. 
Students whose placement is below MATH-lSx Finite 
Mathematics must take MATH-022 Basic Algebra 
before enrolling in Finite Mathematics. Suidents whose 
placement is above Finite Mathematics may enroll in Finite 
Mathematics to satisfy the requirement but are to be 
encouraged to enroll in appropnate sections of the course, as 
designated by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. 
Students may also satisfy the University Mathematics Require- 
ment through examination: 

• AP Calculus AB or AP Calculus BC score of 3, 4, or 5 

• AP Staristics score of 3, 4, or 5 

• SAT 11 Mathematics Level II Achievement test score of 650 

• CLEP Calculus examination score of 75% 

• British A-level mathematics examination with a passing 
grade 

• International Baccalaureate higher-level mathematics 
examination score of 6 or above 

Transfer students and graduates of secondary schools outside 
the United States may also satisfy this requirement by: 

• Passing one of the examinations given by the Department of 
Mathematics and Staristics which demonstrate competence 
equivalent to having successftiUy completed one of the 
following courses: MATH-15x Finite Mathematics, 
MATH-211 Applied Calculus 1, or STAT-202 Basic 
Statistics. Only one of these examinations may be taken and 
that exaininarion may be taken only once, during the first 
semester for which the student is enrolled in degree status 

or 

Transferring a cotirse named "Calculus I" or a mathematics 
course for which "Calculus I" is the prerequisite with a grade 
of B or better fi-om an AG-rated collegiate institution. 
Eligible students should contact the Department of Mathe- 
matics and Statistics for more information about the Mathemat- 
ics and Statistics Equivalency Examination. 



Academic Regulations 63 



Undergraduate Academic Honors 



Dean's List 

Each college or school may issue a dean's list of its under- 
graduate honor students at the end of each semester The mini- 
mum standard for listing is a 3.50 grade point average for the 
semester, earned in a full-time undergraduate program of not 
fewer than 1 5 completed credit hours of which at least 1 2 hours 
must be completed for A-F grade credit. 

Graduation Honors 

Undergraduate graduation honors at American University in- 
clude Latin Honors, based on cumulative grade point average, 
and University Honors, based on a combination of honors 
course options, cumulative grade point average, and completion 
of an honors capstone. To be eligible for graduation honors, stu- 
dents must have completed at least 60 credit hours required for 
their degree in residence at American University and have 
achieved the requisite grade point average. Both Latin Honors 
and University Honors are listed in the commencement program 
and on the student's diploma and permanent record. 

Latin Honors 

Undergraduate Latin Honors and the grade point averages re- 
quired are as follows: 

summa cum laude: 3.90 or higher 

magna aim laude: 3.70 through 3.89 

cum laude: 3.50 through 3.69 
No more than 1 5 credit hours taken PassTail may be included in 
American University work applied toward Latin Honors. 
Courses taken Pass/Fail are not computed in the grade point av- 
erage. 

University Honors Program 

The University Honors Program is a comprehensive program 
of honors options drawn from the General Education curriculum 
and departmental course offerings to qualified undergraduate 
students. The program is characterized by small seminars, indi- 
vidualized attention from faculty, unique access to the resources 
of Washington, D.C., and the special atmosphere of an honors 
community of committed faculty and students. 



Qualified entenng freshmen, transfer students, and current 
students are eligible for admission to the program. Entering 
freshmen are admitted to the program based upon excellence in 
their high school academic performance. Other students, includ- 
ing transfers, may be admitted to the program at the discretion of 
the honors director if they have achieved a cumulative grade 
point average (GPA) of 3.60 for the equivalent of at least one ac- 
ademic year (30 credit hours). 

Students entering the program as freshmen are required to 
complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of honors course work 
with a grade of B or better in each honors course and a cumula- 
tive GPA of 3.50 or above. Honors sUidents take 12 to 18 credit 
hours of foundation-level work from honors sections of English, 
statistics. General Education, or departmental courses. Six to 12 
credit hours of advanced level (300 or above) specialized honors 
work is drawn from honors sections of major or major-related 
courses, honors supplements linked to courses in the major or re- 
lated fields. University Honors colloquia, and honors independ- 
ent study. All University Honors students must complete an 
honors senior capstone project (3 to 6 credit hours). 

Students who enter the University Honors Program after the 
freshman year are not required to complete the frill 30 hours of 
honors course work. Exceptions to the number of required hours 
are determined by the program director and subtracted from the 
foundation-level requirements. 

All University Honors sUidents are required to meet with 
their Honors counselor for advisement before registering each 
semester. 

Students who fulfill the requirements for the University Hon- 
ors Program are eligible to graduate with University Honors. 
University Honors Program students whose honors work in- 
cludes completion of 1 2 hours of advanced-level honors work in 
the major (which may include senior capstone credits) will, with 
departmental recommendation, graduate with University Hon- 
ors in the Major For more information contact the University 
Honors Program at 202-885-6194. 



General Education Program 

• Curricular Area Requirements 

• Questions about General Education 

• Curricular Area Course Clusters 



The General Education Program is designed for all under- 
graduate students regardless of degree program. Aimed at build- 
ing a strong intellectual foundation, the General Education 
requirements are drawn from five curricular areas. The program 
is designed to be completed during the first two years of study, 
allowing students ample time to pursue their major as well as 
study abroad, internships, and minors or second majors. 

The General Education Program is the cornerstone of your 
academic program at American University. This chapter will 
help guide you in building a meaningful and valuable program. 
As you read through it, you should keep in mind the following: 

• students take a total often General Education courses; two 
courses in each of five areas 

• students begin each Curricular Area by taking a foundation 
course, which foniis the base for a second level course 

• all second level courses are linked to a cluster of foundation 
courses, one of which must be taken as a prerequisite for the 
second level course 

• no more than two courses from a discipline may be taken for 
General Education credit: disciplines are designated by the 
course number subject prefi.x (e.g., ANTH, BIO) 

• once a student has enrolled, all courses to fulfill General 
Education Requirements must be taken at American 
University 

General Education Program Deflnitions 

Curricular Area (or "Area"): One of the five content-specific 
subdivisions of the General Education Program: 

1 . The Creative Arts 

2. Traditions that Shape the Western World 

3. Global and Multicultural Perspectives 

4. Social Institutions and Behavior 

5. The Natural Sciences 

The Area is represented ai^er a course title as the first number in 
the following: 1 :x, 2:x, 3:x, 4:x, or 5:x. 
Foundation course: A 100-level course in the General Educa- 
tion Prograin. 

Second-level course: A 200-level course in the General Educa- 
tion Program. 



Level: Refers to whether a course is a foundation or a sec- 
ond-level course. The level is represented after a course title as 
the second number in the following: x: 1 or x:2. 

Cluster: One of two groups of courses (several foundation 
courses and a larger number of second-level courses) in a Cur- 
ricular Area. 

Sequence: A specified order for taking General Education 
classes: take a foundation course fu-st and follow it with one of 
the second-level courses from the same cluster. 

Discipline: Refers to the subject prefix in a course number re- 
gardless of academic department or course content. For exam- 
ple, the course number PHIL- 1 05 refers to a philosophy course; 
the course number RELG-210 refers to a religion course. Al- 
though these courses are in the Philosophy and Religion Depart- 
ment, they have different prefixes and are in different 
disciplines. The course number ARTH-105 refers to an art his- 
tory course; the course number HIST- 1 00 refers to a history 
course. Although these courses are both about history, they are 
in different disciplines. 

Curricular Area Requirements 

Students select courses from those that are designated as 
General Education courses. SUidents choose two courses, one 
foundation course and one second-level course in the same clus- 
ter, in each curricular area. 

Each curricular area offers students a choice of one of two 
course clusters comprising several foundation courses any of 
which may lead to a larger number of second-level courses. 

Courses at the foundation level introduce students to the fiin- 
damental concepts, issues, and achievements in the disciplines. 
Courses deal explicitly with the appropriate processes and stan- 
dards for gathering and evaluating information (quantification, 
experiments, primary sources, authoritative texts) and interpre- 
tation (methods of investigation and analytic skills) in a specific 
disciplinary field. All science foundation courses include labo- 
ratory experience. The courses are designed to help students 
achieve a broad view of how different disciplinary viewpoints 
and fields of knowledge can contribute to their understanding of 
themselves and the world around them. 



64 



General Education Program 65 



General Education foundation courses differ from traditional 
survey courses by integrating into the course some of the per- 
spectives and foundation skills essential to a fijll education. 

These elements include the following, as appropriate: 

• written and oral communication 

• critical thinking, including information literacy 

• ethical awareness 

• aesthetic sensibility 

• diverse perspectives, including race, class, culture, gender, 
and academic discipline 

• a global point of view 

The second-level courses follow specific groups of founda- 
tion courses, forming a coherent curricular sequence and rein- 
forcing the learning objectives of the foundation course. The 
foundation courses selected from a variety of disciplines assure 
breadth in the student's program while the second-level courses 
build on the foundation and encourage study in depth. 

Course Selection 

Students select two courses, a foundation course followed by 
a more specialized course in an approved sequence, in each cur- 
ricular area. Students will not be able to satisfy General Educa- 
tion Requirements with more than two courses in any one 
discipline even though a discipline may have courses included 
in more than one curricular area. Courses required for College 
Writing and University Mathematics do not count in the 
two-course limit. 

Prerequisites 

A second- level course may not be taken for General Educa- 
tion credit until after the prerequisite foundation course has been 
satisfactorily completed. Students who have placed at or below 
Finite Mathematics must satisfy the Universify Mathematics 
Requirement before enrolling in a foundation course in the Nat- 
ural Sciences curricular area. Students who have placed above 
Finite Mathematics may take the foundation course in the Natu- 
ral Sciences curricular area at the same time they take the course 
work satisfying the Universify Mathematics Requirement, or 
even beforehand. 

Relation to the Major 

The requirements for the major, the area of a student's aca- 
demic concentration, are listed under individual degree pro- 
grams. Many of the courses in the General Education Program 
also meet requirements of the major. Students interested in a 
double major need to plan ahead if they expect to fiilfill all re- 
quirements within 1 20 credit hours. 

Grading Requirements 

To receive General Education credit, a student must success- 
fully complete a General Education course with a grade of D or 
better Students may elect to take a General Education course on 



a pass/fail basis. However, if the course is also being taken to fiil- 
fill a requirement for the major the grading policies for that pro- 
gram should be consulted. 

Advanced Placement Credit 

Students presenting a 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement ex- 
amination, 75% on the CLEP examination, or grades for which 
they have received credit from the British A Levels, CEGEP, In- 
ternational Baccalaureate, German Abittir, or other international 
credential for which they have been granted credit by American 
Universify may apply the credit for up to four courses to meet 
General Education requirements in any of the five curricular ar- 
eas. Credit for General Education may only be awarded when 
specific General Education courses, which have been so desig- 
nated, match particular exam results (with the exception of the 
CEGEP and German Abitur, which are handled ad hoc) and only 
for examinations taken prior to entering American Universify. 
Specific information regarding application of this principle is 
contained in the "General Education Advanced Placement 
Credit Articulation" effective for the academic year of admis- 
sion. This document is maintained by the General Education of- 
fice and is available in all advising units. 

Transfer Students 

Transfer students satisfy their General Education Require- 
ments through a combination of appropriate transfer courses and 
completion of courses in the General Education Program at 
American University. Through the evaluation of equivalent 
courses taken at another institution and with the approval of a 
student's dean, transfer credit may fulfill all 30 credit hours. In 
some cases, students supplement transfer credit with General 
Education courses taken at the university to meet the 30-hoiir re- 
quirement. The need to satisfy sequences is waived when 6 
hours in a curricular area are accepted for transfer credit. 

Associate in Arts Degree 

In the fields in which the universify offers an associate de- 
gree, this degree requires the completion of at least 60 credit 
hours. Twenfy-four hours of courses must be in the General Ed- 
ucation Program, to include one foundation course in each of the 
five curricular areas and one second-level course in each of three 
of the five ciuricular areas. 

Study at Another Institution 

Transfer credit may be used to fulfill General Education Re- 
quirements through the evaluation of equivalent courses taken at 
another institution and with the approval of the student's dean. 
Because of the special nature of the program, after the student 
has been admitted to a degree program at American Universify 
no credit toward General Education Requirements may be 
earned through transfer credit. 



66 General Education Proarani 



General Education and the University 
Mathematics Requirement 

All students must fulfill the University Mathematics Re- 
quirement before enrolling in their first (foundation level) 
course in the Natural Sciences curricular area (.Area 5). unless 
they have placed above Finite Mathematics. Students who have 
placed above the level of Finite Mathematics may take the foun- 
dation course before or concurrently with course work taken to 
satisfy the University Mathematics Requirement. 

Questions about General Education 

ll'Iw has to complete the General Education Program? 

All American University undergraduates must flilfill General 
Education requirements. 

How many courses do I take? 

You must take tv\ o courses in each of the fi\e Curricular 
Areas ( for a total often). First select one of two course clusters in 
an area. Take from it a foundation course and then follow it with 
a second-level course that appears in the same cluster. This se- 
quencing is essential to the concept of the program, as each sec- 
ond-level course links in content to particular foundation 
courses. 

Is it possible to take a second-level course before taking the 
foundation course? 

No, if you are taking the courses for General Education 
credit, the foundation courses ser\e as a prerequisite for sec- 
ond-level courses. 

What if a course closes before I can register for it or it 's not of- 
fered the semester I want to take it'.' 

Almost all courses are offered at least once a year, so wait un- 
til next semester and see if it fits into your schedule. Or, you may 
take a different course if it's compatible with your schedule and 
you'\e met all the prerequisites. Howe\er, if it's a second-le\el 
course, be sure it's in the same cluster as the foundation course 
you've taken. 

//oh many courses may I take from each discipline for General 
Education credit? 

Although some academic departments ha\ e courses in se\ - 
eral Areas, you may not take more than two General Education 
courses in a discipline. For example, you may only take two so- 
ciology courses (course numbers beginning with SOCY) out of 
your ten General Education courses. 

What grade do I have to get in my General Education classes? 

You must get a D or better in order to get General Education 
credit, ^'ou may also take a General Education class on a 
pass/fail basis. However, if you are taking a General Education 
class to fulfill a requirement towards your major, you may need 
a different grade. Check with the appropriate academic depart- 
ment to be sure. 



May I take a General Education course, but not for General Ed- 
ucation credit? 

Yes. you may be able to count courses in the General Educa- 
tion Program towards your major or minor requirements, or for 
elective credit. Courses are offered for non-General Education 
credit imder the same course number. 

May I spread out my General Education courses over four 
years? 

The program is designed so that it can be completed in your 
first tuo years. You should finish your General Education re- 
quirements as soon as possible to keep your last years open for 
off-campus opportunities, such as internships and study abroad. 
If you have not yet completed your math requirement, it is es- 
sential that you speak to your advisor about its connection to the 
Area 5 Natural Sciences requirement. 

Is there any way I can he exempted from the General Education 
requirements'' 

No, all undergraduate smdents at American University must 
complete the General Education Program as well as the College 
Writing and University Mathematics requirements. 

May I use my advanced placement credits towards General Ed- 
ucation requirements? 

Students presenting a 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement ex- 
amination, 75% on the CLEP examination, or grades for which 
they have received credit fi^om the British A Levels, CEGEP, In- 
temational Baccalaureate. German .^bitur or other international 
credential for which they have been granted credit may be able 
to apply the credit for up to four courses to meet the General Ed- 
ucation requirements in any of the five Curricular Areas. Credit 
for General Education may only be awarded when specific Gen- 
eral Education courses, which have been so designated, match 
particular exam results (with the exception of the CEGEP and 
German Abitur. which are handled ad hoc) and only for exams 
taken prior to entering American University. Specific informa- 
tion is contained in the General Education Advanced Placement 
Credit Articulation effective for the academic year of admission. 
This document is maintained by the General Education Office 
and is available in all advising units and on-line at: 
wwT,v.american.eduprovost/gened/CreditByExam.cfm .. 

What if I want to take a General Education course at another 
school or use a study abroad course for General Education 
credit? 

Due to the unique naUire of General Education courses and 
how they're taught, once students are enrolled, they must com- 
plete all General Education courses at American University. 
Courses at other instimtions or other American University 
courses may not be substituted. 



General Education Program 67 



Do transfer students have to complete General Education re- 
quirements? 

Yes, transfer students must still flilfill General Education re- 
quirements. However, courses taken prior to admission to 
American University will be matched with General Education 
courses to determine whether they qualify for credit in the pro- 
gram. It is technically possible for all ten courses to be trans- 
ferred with a dean's approval. If a sUident transfers both courses 
in one Curricular Area, the sequencing requirement is waived. 

Where do I go for help in planning my General Education 
courses? 

SUidents should take the responsibility of planning which 
General Education courses they will take, making sure they fol- 
low all program requirements and rules. Each semester before 
registering on-line, you will be reminded to review your elec- 
tronic degree audit report, which will indicate the General Edu- 
cation requirements you still need to fulfill. If you have 
questions or are having difficulty in choosing a particular 
course, your academic advisor or the publications available on 
campus and on-line at www.american.eduyprovost/gened may 
be able to assist you. You may also contact the General Educa- 
tion office at 202-885-3879 or e-mail: gened@american.edu. 

What 's the connection between the General Education Pro- 
gram and the University Mathematics Requirement? 

You must fiilfill the University Mathematics Requirement 
before enrolling in your first (foundation level) course in the 
NaUiral Sciences curricular area (Area 5), unless you have 
"placed" above Finite Mathematics. If you have placed above 
the level of Finite Mathematics, you may take the foundation 
course in Area 5 before or concurrently with course work taken 
to satisfy the University Mathematics Requirement. 



Most Important Program Regulations 

• Take a foundation and second-level course in sequence 
from the same cluster in each curricular area. 

• Take the foundation course before the second-level course, 
unless the credit for the second-level course is accepted 
through transfer. 

• Do not take more than two courses from any single 
discipline as indicated by the subject prefix (for example, 
BIO is Biology and HIST is History) for General Education 
credit (including transferred courses). 

• Fulfill the University Mathematics requirement before 
enrolling in the Natural Sciences curricular area, unless you 
have placed above Finite Mathematics. 

• Once enrolled, all courses to fiilfill General Education 
requirements must be taken at American University. 

• You must pass a General Education course with a grade of D 
or better. You may take a General Education course 
Pass/Fail if the course is not taken for your major or if your 
major program allows the Pass/Fail option. 



68 General Education Program 



Curricular Area 1: The Creative Arts 



The creative aits celebrate the hiunan capacity to imagine, to 
create, and to transform ideas into expressive forms such as 
paintings, poems, and symphonies. The arts provide us with a 
rich record of human cultures and values throughout time. They 
enable us to understand and enjoy the experiences of our senses 
and to sharpen our aesthetic sense — that human quality through 
which we comprehend beauty. To appreciate the relationship 
between fonn and meaning is to realize that the creative arts, re- 
gardless of their medium of expression, share important princi- 
ples. 

Courses in this curricular area have varied emphases: the pro- 
cess of creativity, the analysis of the artistic imagination, or the 
relationship between artists, their works, and the societies in 
which their works are produced. Students may choose a 



"hands-on" experience and paint, draw, design, or write a poem. 
Altematively, they may study both classic and recent works of 
literature, art, music, dance, or theatre. All courses in this area 
challenge the student to understand creativity and the distinctive 
intellectual process of the human imagination. 
The Crearive Arts: Goals 

• examine the nature of creativity, especially imaginative and 
intuitive thinking 

• situate creative works, and judgments about those creative 
works, in their appropriate social and historical context 
develop the student's own creative and expressive abilities, 
so that the student can better understand the qualities that 
shape an artist's work 



Foundation Courses: Students select a 100-level course in one of the two clusters. 

Second-level Courses: Students select a 200-level course in the same cluster as the foundation course. 



Cluster One: Understanding Creative 
Processes 



Cluster Two; 



Understanding Creative 
Works 



Foundation Courses 

ARTS- 100 Art: The Studio Experience 

LIT- 105 The Literary Imagination 

PERF-1 10 Understanding Music 

PERT- 1 1 5 Theater: Principles, Plays and Performance 



Foundation Courses 

ARTH-105 Art: The Historical Experience 

COMM-105 Visual Literacy 

LIT- 120 Interpreting Literature 

LIT- 135 Critical Approach to the Cinema 



Second-Level Courses 

ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 
ARTS-210 The Artist's Perspective: Painting 
ARTS-2 1 5 The Artist's Perspective: Sculpture 
LIT-2 1 5 Writers in Print/in Person 
PERF-200 Dance and Society 
PERF-205 Masterpieces of Music 
PERF-210 Greatness in Music 
PERF-225 The African American Experience in the 
Performing Arts 



Second-Level Courses 

ANTH-225 Language and Human Experience 
ARTH-2 1 Modem Art: Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries 
ARTH-2 1 5 Architecture: Washington and the World 
LIT-225 The African Writer 
LlT-245 The Experience of Poetry 
LIT-270 Transformations of Shakespeare 
PERF-215 Opera on Stage and Film 
PERF-220 Reflections of American Society on Stage 

and Screen 
PHIL-230 Meaning and Purpose in the Arts 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-2 1 General Education Area 1 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit: specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-2 10 General Education Area 1 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



General Education Program 69 



Curricular Area 2: Traditions that Shape the Western World 



The rich traditions that shape the Western world convey 
ideas, visions, and cultural practices that are shared, lasting, and 
tenacious. Whether dominant or prevailing values that many 
people of Western countries share or the folk traditions that grow 
out of small communities, these deeply rooted phenomena help 
us make choices about identity and affinity with family, commu- 
nity, history, values, and place. 

Courses in this curricular area have varied emphases. Some 
examine powerfijl visions that philosophers, political theorists, 
historians, religious thinkers, scientists, and social critics have 
of the Western experience. Others explore competing ideas 
about human nature, liberty and equality, and the consequences 
of social change. Finally, some uncover those traditions grow ing 
out of the unique experiences of women, ethnic groups, and in- 
digenous peoples as they express and preserve their own princi- 
ples of social organization and cultural expression. 



All courses in this area emphasize chronology and share a 
close attention both to the substance of the past and the ways to 
study it. Through direct engagement with primary texts, stu- 
dents learn to ask questions, debate ideas, and come to under- 
stand the ways that we experience the events and ideas of the 
past in our own lives. 

Traditions that Shape the Western World: Goals 

• explore the diverse historical and philosophical traditions 
that have shaped the contemporary Western world 

• read and discuss fundamental texts from those traditions, 
situating the texts in their appropriate intellectual contexts 

• develop the student's ability to critically and comparatively 
reflect on religious and philosophical issues, in dialogue 
with others both past and present 



Foundation Courses: Students select a 100-level course in one of the two clusters. 

Second-level Courses: Suidents select a 200-level course in the same cluster as the foundation course. 



Cluster One: Cultures of the West 



Cluster Two: Western Heritage and 
Institutions 



Foundation Courses 

HIST- 100 Historians and the Living Past 
HIST-1 10 Renaissance and Revolutions: 

Europe, 1400-1815 
LIT- 125 Great Books That Shaped the Western Worid 
WGST-150 Women's Voices through Time 



Foundation Courses 

GOVT- 105 Individual Freedom vs. Authority 

HlST-1 15 Work and Community 

JLS-110 Westem Legal Tradition 

PHIL- 105 Westem Philosophy 

RELG-105 The Religious Heritage of the West 



Second-Level Courses 

ANTH-235 Early America: The Buried Past 
ARTH-205 Art of the Renaissance 
HIST-205 American Encounters: 1492-1865 
HIST-2I5 Social Forces that Shaped America 
JWST-205 Ancient and Medieval Jewish Civilization 
JWST-210 Voices of Modem Jewish Literature 
LIT-235 African American Literature 
LIT-240 Asian American Literauire 
LIT-265 Literature and Society in Victorian England 



Second-Level Courses 

COMM-270 How the News Media Shape History 
HlST-235 The West in Crisis. 1900-1945 
JLS-225 American Legal Culture 
LFS-230 The Modernist Explosion: Culture and 

Ideology in Europe 
PHIL-220 Moral Philosophy 

PHlL-235 Theories of Democracy and Human Rights 
PHYS-230 Changing Views of the Universe 
RELG-220 Religious Thought 
SOCY-2I5 The Rise of Critical Social Thought 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-220 General Education Area 2 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-220 General Education Area 2 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



70 General Education Program 



Curricular Area 3: Global and Multicultural Perspectives 



Global interdependence is a powerfiil fact of life. Through an 
exploration of societies of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin 
America and Europe, this curricular area opens the doors into 
varied cultures and issues that challenge a parochial understand- 
ing of the world. 

Students may select courses that focus on the major issues of 
contemporary world politics, including management of conflict, 
economic competition, and environmental threats to the quality 
of life. Alternatively, there are courses that emphasize either a 
comparative or cross-cultural examination of culuires, societies, 
polities, and belief systems and acknowledge the importance of 
recognizing and overcoming cultural barriers. Finally, there are 
courses which focus on the dilemma of the global majority — the 
three-quarters of the world's population who live in countries 
striving for national identity as well as economic and political 
development. 

All courses in this area encourage a better understanding of 
the dimensions of experience and belief that distinguish cultures 

Foundation Courses: Students select a 100-level course in one of the two clusters. 

Second-level Courses: Students select a 200-level course in the same cluster as the foundation course. 



and countries from one another and, conversely, the commonali- 
ties that bind human experience together. The courses aim to 
stimulate awareness of the need for enhanced international and 
intercultural communication. 

Global and Multicultural Perspectives: Goals 

• explore those habits of thought and feeling that distinguish 
regions, countries, and cultures from one another 

• discuss, in comparative and cross-cultural perspective, the 
concepts, patterns, and trends that characterize 
contemporary global politics 

• develop the student's capacity to critically analyze major 
issues in international and intercultural relations, especially 
how categories of difference are organized within and 
across cultures and how they affect political systems 



Cluster One: Global Perspective 



Cluster Two: Multicultural Experience 



Foundation Courses 

ECON-1 10 The Global Majority 
GOVT- 1 30 Comparative Politics 
HIST- 1 20 Imperialism and Revolution 
SIS-105 World Politics 
SIS- 110 Beyond Sovereignty 



Foundation Courses 

ANTH-1 10 Culture: The Human Mirror 

LIT- 150 Third World Literature 

RELG-185 Forms of the Sacred: Religions of the East 

SIS- 140 Cross-Cultural Communication 

SOCY-1 10 Views from the Third Worid 



Second-Level Courses 

COMM-280 Contemporary Media in a Global Society 

EDU-285 Education for International Development 

GOVT-235 Dynamics of Political Change 

HIST-225 Russia and the Origins of Contemporary Eurasia 

IBUS-200 The Global Marketplace 

LFS-200 Russia and the United States 

SIS-2 1 5 Competition in an Interdependent World 

SIS-220 Confronting Our Differences/Discovering Our 

Similarities: Conflict Resolution 
SIS-255 China, Japan and the United States 
SOCY-225 Contemporary Arab World 



Second-Level Courses 

ANTH-210 Roots of Racism and Interracial Harmony 

ANTH-215 Sex, Gender, and Culture 

ANTH-220 Living in Multicultural Societies 

ANTH-230 India: Its Living Traditions 

HIST-250 Civilization and Modernization: Asia 

LFS-210 Latin America: History, Art, Literature 

RELG-2 10 Non-Western Religious Traditions 

SIS-2 10 Human Geography: Peoples, Places, and Cultures 

SIS-245 The World of Islam 

SIS-250 Civilizations of Africa 

SOCY-235 Women in the Third World 



WUd Card Courses 

GNED-230 General Education Area 3 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-230 General Education Area 3 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



General Education Program 7 1 



Curricular Area 4: Social Institutions and Behavior 



Studying the foundations of contemporary American society 
reveals the elements of complex social systems, the way indi- 
viduals function in varied social settings, and the root causes of 
social behavior In comprehending the mechanisms and rules 
that give shape to complex societies, we gain strength to influ- 
ence institutional processes. Through reflection on principles 
that explain human behavior, we create understanding of our in- 
terpersonal experiences. 

Courses in this curricular area are of three kinds: those that 
use one of the traditional social science disciplines to provide an 
overview of the interaction of individuals and the institutions 
that shape our economic, political, and social experience; those 
that focus on a single institution and the complex ways in which 
it affects our lives; and those that use a societal dilemma as the 
entry point for discovering the ways in which the quality of indi- 
vidual life is protected or challenged in various settings. 

The many and distinct disciplines that contribute to this area 
are united by a self-conscious dedication to the modes of inquiry 



of contemporary social science, as applied to the American ex- 
perience. As strongly as it emphasizes the substance of knowl- 
edge, this curricular area emphasizes how we create knowledge 
and arrive at understanding. 

Social Institutions and Behavior: Goals 

• study the institutions, systems, and patterns of governance 
and of economic and social organization that underlie 
contemporary societies 

• place policy options and their consequences in their 
appropriate social and political context, drawing on classic 
and contemporary theories of human organization 

• develop the student's capacity to critically reflect on the 
organization of societies and the relationship between the 
individual and the society, using the distinctive methods of 
inquiry appropriate to the study of social institutions 



Foundation Courses: Students select a 100-Ievel course in one of the two clusters. 

Second-level Courses: Students select a 200-level course in the same cluster as the foundation course. 



Cluster One: Institutions 



Cluster Two: Social Behavior 



Foundation Courses 

COMM-100 Understanding Media 
ECON-IOO Macroeconomics 
GOVT-1 10 Politics in the United States 
SOCY-150 Global Sociology 



Foundation Courses 

ANTH-150 Anthropology of American Life 
PSYC-105 Psychology: Understanding Human Behavior 
SOCY-IOO American Society 
WGST-125 Gender in Society 



Second-Level Courses 

AMST-240 Poverty and Culture 
COMM-275 Dissident Media: Voices from the 

Underground 
ECON-200 Microeconomics 
FrN-200 Personal Finance and Financial Institutions 
GOVT-210 Political Power and American Public Pohcy 
GOVT-2 1 5 Civil Rights and Liberties 
PHIL-240 Ethics in the Professions 
SOCY-210 Inequality; Class, Race, Ethnicity 
WGST-225 Gender, Politics, and Power 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-240 General Education Area 4 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



Second-Level Courses 

EDU-205 Schools and Society 

HFlT-245 Gender, Culture and Health 

HIST-2 1 Ethnicity in America 

HIST-220 Women in America 

IDIS-2I0 Contemporary Multiethnic Voices 

JLS-200 Deprivation of Liberty 

JLS-215 Violence and Institutions 

JLS-245 Cities and Crime 

PSYC-205 Social Psychology 

PSYC-2 1 5 Abnormal Psychology and Society 

PSYC-235 Theories of Personality 

SOCY-205 Families in Sociological Perspective 

Wild Card Courses 

GNED-240 General Education Area 4 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



72 General Education Program 



Curricular Area 5: The Natural Sciences 



Through observation and analysis of the physical and biolog- 
ical world, scientists discern basic pnnciples that explain natural 
phenomena and unravel many mysteries. Whether chemist, bi- 
ologist, physicist, or experimental psychologist, scientists rely 
on theory and experimentation to test and refine understanding 
of our bodies, our complex environment, and the universe. 

All courses in this curricular area focus on the nature of scien- 
tific reasoning, discovery, and invention through the systemafic 
exploration of basic concepts within their historical context. 
Foundation courses unite "hands-on" scientific experimenta- 
tion, inductive reasoning, and deductive analysis with the study 
of basic principles such as the structure of matter, biological 
evolution, human behavior, and thermodynamics. The sec- 
ond-level courses include both traditional advanced study in 
each discipline as well as integrative courses such as oceanogra- 
phy, earth sciences, astronomy, and human biochemistry and 
health. This curricular area conveys a respect for the natural 



world, extends scientific literacy, and refines the tnodes of 
thought that characterize scientific inquiry. 

The Natural Sciences: Goals 

• study the makeup and workings of the natural world and the 
beings inliabiting it 

• examine the historical development and current status of 
scientific methods, concepts, and principles, allowing 
contemporary scientific knowledge to be placed in its 
proper context 

• develop the student's own problem-solving and laboratory 
skills, so that the student can better understand how 
scientific research works 



Foundation Courses: Students select a 100-leveI course in one of the two clusters. 

Second-level Courses: Students select a 200-level course in the same cluster as the foundation course. 



Cluster One: The Living World 

Foundation Courses 

BIO- 100 Great Experiments in Biology 

BIO-110 General Biology I 

PSYC-1 1 5 Psychology as a Natural Science 



Cluster Two: The Physical World 

Foundation Courses 

CHEM-IOO The Molecular World 
CHEM-1 10 General Chemistry I 
PHYS-lOO Physics for the Modem World 
PHYS-105 College Physics 1 
PHYS-1 10 University Physics I 



Second-Level Courses 

ANTH-250 Human Origins 

BIO-200 Structure and Function of the Human Body 

BIO-210 General Biology II 

(prerequisite: BIO- HOG General Biology 1) 
BIO-220 The Case for Evolution 
BIO-240 Oceanography 
ENVS-250 Living in the Environment 
CHEM-205 The Human Genome 
PSYC-200 Behavior Principles 
PSYC-220 The Senses 
PSYC-240 Drugs and Behavior 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-250 General Education Area 5 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



Second-Level Courses 

BIO-240 Oceanography 
CHEM-205 The Human Genome 
CHEM-210 General Chemistry II 

(prerequisite: CHEM-1 lOG General Chemistry I) 
CHEM-220 Environmental Resources and Energy 
CHEM-230 Earth Sciences 
CHEM-250 Criminalistics, Crime, and Society 
HFIT-205 Current Concepts in Nutrition 
PHYS-200 Physics for a New Millenniuin 
PHYS-205 College Physics II 

(prerequisite: PHYS-1 05G College Physics I) 
PHYS-210 University Physics II 

(prerequisite: PHYS-1 lOG University Physics I) 
PHYS-220 Astronomy 

Wild Card Courses 

GNED-250 General Education Area 5 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Dean Peter Stan- 
Associate Dean for Budget and Administration 

Kathleen Kennedy-Corey 

Assistant Dean for Program Development 

Mary Schellinger 

Academic Counselors Tyler Akins, Maria Boren, 

Cheryl Gindlesperger, Anne Kaiser, Alicia Mandec, 

Jack Ramsey, Douglas Vibert 

Students should make appointments to meet with 

academic counselors through Academic Affairs 

by phone: 202-885-2453, e-mail: ask-cas@american.edu 

or go to: www.american.edu/cas 

The College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) is dedicated to 
excellence in teaching, scholarship, the arts, and service to its 
local, national, and intemational communities. 

The college provides a rich education in the liberal arts and 
sciences for all of American University's undergraduate stu- 
dents, offers challenging programs of study for its undergradu- 
ate and graduate majors; and fosters outstanding research, 
practice, and creative activity. 

The college is committed to the core purposes of liberal edu- 
cation: promoting free and rational discourse, fostering an un- 
derstanding of the diversity of human experience, providing the 
critical intellectual skills necessary to navigate a rapidly chang- 
ing world, and integrating knowledge across disciplinary 
boundaries. 

Undergraduate Study 

Academic Advisement 

The college challenges students to assume substantial re- 
sponsibility for defining their educational goals, yet provides 
careful professional guidance to help them respond to the chal- 
lenge. Undergraduates plan their academic programs with aca- 
demic counselors and faculty advisors according to their 
interests, professional plans, and academic progress. Before 
they enroll in classes, first-semester freshmen choose courses 
with the assistance of a detailed curriculum guide. During 
fi-eshman orientation, students are assigned an academic coun- 
selor who advises them until they choose their majors, usually 
by the end of the sophomore year. After students formally de- 
clare their majors, they are advised by faculty advisors from 



their major departments. Transfer students go to the depart- 
ments of their intended majors for academic advisement, or if 
undecided on a major, are advised by an academic counselor. 

Assessment of Experiential Learning 

The Assessment of Experiential Learning ( AEL) program, 
designed for adults who have been out of high school for at least 
eight years, enables students to earn credit for learning gained 
through work, travel, and community service. In EDU-240 
Analysis of Experiential Learning, students work closely with 
faculty to develop a portfolio that describes, analyzes, and doc- 
uments their life experience and learning. Students can earn up 
to 30 credits applied as electives toward an undergraduate de- 
gree program. For more information on the AEL program call 
202-885-2453. 

Foreign Language 

The College of Arts and Sciences encourages students to 
gain proficiency in at least one foreign language, especially 
those embarking on a career in intemational relations, study of 
the humanities, or specialization in minority groups in the 
United States. Graduate study will often require proficiency in 
one or more foreign languages. 

Internships and Cooperative Education 

Internship and cooperative education engage the student in 
practical expenences, support learning, and provide on-the-job 
training. Interns work in many organizations in both the public 
and the private sectors in the Washington area. The growing 
number of internships in the college is testimony to both their 
popularity and their success. For more information on intem- 
ships and cooperative education, see also Career Services. 

Majors 

No later than the end of the sophomore year, CAS students 
are expected to declare an academic major. In this field the stu- 
dent pursues study in depth and synthesizes academic knowl- 
edge. Major programs are described in the departmental 
sections. Students should become familiar with departinental 
requirements and regulations as stated in this catalog. When 
making a formal declaration of major, students are assigned an 
academic advisor who will supervise their studies until gradua- 
tion. Students interested in the natural sciences, mathematics, 
music, and art need to take specific courses in the freshman year 
if they intend to complete a degree in eight semesters. Such stu- 



73 



74 College of Arts and Sciences 



dents should declare their interests as soon as possible and seek 
explicit counseling from the appropriate department. 
Interdisciplinary Major 

This program permits College of Arts and Sciences under- 
graduates to complete an interdisciplinary major according to 
their needs, abilities, and interests. A program is formulated 
with the advice and approval of three faculty members from 
disciplines relevant to the student's defined emphasis, and is 
subject to the review and approval of the dean. 

The initiative lies with the student, who is responsible for 
determining the concept or theme on which the program is to 
center With the three faculty members, the student determines 
the requirements of the chosen concentration and identifies a 
sequence of course work that fulfills the program's objectives. 
The program must be formulated in a written statement no 
later than the first semester of the junior year For more infor- 
mation see undergraduate degree requirements. 
Minors 

Undergraduate students may earn a minor in most depart- 
ments and programs of the College of Arts and Sciences. All 
minor programs consist of a minimum of 1 8 credit hours, in- 
cluding at least 9 credit hours at the 300 level or above. For all 
minors, at least 9 credit hoiu-s of the stated requirements must 
be taken in residence at American University and at least 12 
credit hours of the minor must be unique to the minor. For 
more information see undergraduate degree requirements. For 
descriptions of specific minor programs, see individual depart- 
mental listings. 
Preprofessional Programs 

Preprofessional programs are available in engineering, law, 
and medicine and related health fields. Pre-theology students 
find the university's relationship with the Wesley Theological 
Seminary beneficial, and the Kay Spiritual Life Center directs 
an innovative program of religious activities that complements 
preprofessional studies in religion. 
Study Abroad 

AU Abroad ofters the opportunity for students to study 
abroad and gain full American University course credit. All 
students are encouraged to leam and work in another culture. 
AU Abroad enclave programs, many of which include intern- 
ship opportunities, are offered in Beijing, Berlin, Brussels, 
Cairo, Havana, London, Madrid, Nairobi, Paris, Prague, 
Rabat, and Santiago. In addition, through the AU Abroad Part- 
ner program students may spend a semester or year at presti- 
gious universities across the globe, including Canada, Mexico, 
England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Poland, Netherlands, Ar- 
gentina, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, India, Israel, Egypt, 
Lebanon, and Sharjah, U.A.E. International sUidy tours led by 
faculty members are offered during semester breaks and sum- 



mer sessions. For more information on AU Abroad programs, 
call 202-885- 1 320 or 866-3 1 3-0757, 
e-mail auabroad(a!american.edu or go to: 
vyww.auabroad.american.edu/ . 

Associate in Arts (A.A.) 

This program is designed to serve the educational needs of 
high school graduates who seek professional or personal ad- 
vancement through either full- or part-time study. Some students 
do not or cannot remain in college for four years, yet desire to 
complete a degree program. The Associate in Arts degree may 
be awarded after successfiil completion of two years' study or 
the equivalent. 

Admission to the Program 

Any student admitted to degree status at American Univer- 
sity is eligible for admission to this program. 

University Requirements 

• A total of 60 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total of eight courses including one foundation course in 
each of the five curricular areas and one second-level course in 
three of the five curricular areas, in an approved sequence. 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Graduate Study 

The graduate programs of the College of Arts and Sciences 
are directed toward the development of highly competent scien- 
tists, artists and performers, sensitive teachers, and critical schol- 
ars. To achieve this objective, the college provides an academic 
setting and climate favorable to the free interchange of ideas and 
the disciplined exploration and testing of concepts and hypothe- 
ses. 

Doctoral programs are offered in anthropology, economics, 
history, and psychology with tracks in clinical psychology and 
behavior, cognition, and neuroscience. All departments offer 
master's programs, including innovative interdisciplinary stud- 
ies that enhance students' understanding of and sensitivity to, 
the intellectual issues and practical applications of their own 
fields. 



American Studies 75 



American Studies 



Faculty from the Departments of Antliropology, History, Litera- 
ture, and other departments and schools of the university teach 
courses in the program. 
Scholar-in-Residence K.Vester 

The American Studies Program offers students the opportu- 
nity to explore American culture through many paths, including 
America's intellectual traditions, creative arts, popular media, 
material culture, ethnic variety, folklore, social structure, and 
social change. Students leam to draw together the tools and in- 
sights of other disciplines to capture the complexities of Ameri- 
can society, and to discover what Americans share as well as 
how they differ In addition to foundation courses in the pro- 
gram, students choose one area of particular interest to them. 
Some decide to concenffate in a field such as literature, busi- 
ness, journalism, anthropology, history, or art. Others create a 
more personalized specialty such as women's studies, Afri- 
can-American studies, or urban affairs. 

All students leam to use and appreciate Washington's re- 
search centers and cultural resources, including the Library of 
Congress, the National Archives, the Smithsonian Institution, 
and the city's many museums, and many study the city itself 
Most students work at internships during their senior year in 
such places as Congress, the Kennedy Center, the Smithsonian, 
or Common Cause. 

The goals of the program are to help each student develop 
an area of expertise and to build the skills for thinking critically, 
writing clearly, and untangling the relationship between large 
cultural forces and ordinary peoples' life experiences. Program 
graduates work in such diverse fields as journalism, local or na- 
tional government, foreign service, teaching, museums, private 
business, and social services. Many students go on to graduate 
study or to law school. 

B.A. in American Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Fonnal admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale) in two courses related to the major 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39 credit hours with grades of C or better 



Course Requirements 

• AMST-206 American Dreams/ American Lives (3) 

• AMST-400 Interpreting American Culture (3) 

• One of the following as a senior project; 
AMST-410 Senior Thesis (3) 

AMST-491 Intemship in American Studies (3) 

• 9 additional credit hours in American studies (AMST-xxx) 
courses at the 300 level or above, excluding independent 
study and internships 

• 2 1 credit hours of courses focusing on Washington, D.C., the 
United States, or the United States and the world, selected 
from at least three departments or prograins including 
American Studies, Anthropology, Art History, History, or 
Literature, with no more than 9 credit hours taken in the same 
department. 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more infomia- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the tnaster's program. 

Minor in American Studies 

• I S credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• AMST-206 American Dreams/American Lives (3) 



76 College of Arts and Sciences 



• AMST-400 Inteqjreting American Culture (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours of courses focusing on Washington. D.C.. the 
United States, or the United States and the world, selected 
from at least three departments or programs including 



American Studies, Anthropology, Art History, History, or 
Literature, with no more than 6 credit hours taken in the same 
department. 



Anthropology 



Chair William Leap 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a GL. Burkhart, J. Gero, GL. Harris. 

C.W. McNen. Jr. 

Professor D.B. Koenig, W.L. Leap. B. Williams 

Associate Professor R.J. Dent 

Assistant Professor A. Pine. S. Prince. D. Sayers. D. Sen, 

E. Smith, D. Vine. R. Watkins 

Public Anthropologist in Residence G Schafft. S. Taylor, 

Humans have always constimted their families, sexuality, 
gendered identities, social groups, religious practices, work, 
play, and artistic expression in dramatically diverse ways. An- 
thropologists explore everyday experience, cultural difference, 
and power relations in order to understand this diversity in the 
context of local and global histories. Stark inequalities are also 
part of the human e.xpenence, and anthropologists seek to un- 
cover the ideologies and processes that create and mask those 
inequalities. 

Different kinds of anthropologists explore difference and 
power from specialized perspectives. Cultural and social an- 
thropologists search for the connections between cultural 
meanings and lived human experience. Archaeologists probe 
the remains of past civilizations for significant transformations 
in the ways communities organized their homes and labor Bi- 
ological anthropologists document the dynamics of human 
evolution and sUidy nutrition, health, and illness in their cul- 
tural contexts. Linguists examine the varied texts that speakers 
create for clues that language holds to hierarchy and personal 
expression. 

Anthropology students examine past and present societies 
to bring anthropological and archaeological theory and prac- 
tice to ongoing struggles against racism, sexism, homophobia, 
inequality, poverty, environmental degradation, and eth- 
nic/cultural genocide. The undergraduate anthropolog>' pro- 
gram at American University introduces students to all four 
subfields of anthropology, and many students specialize in 
one. Graduate programs include the MA. in Public Anthropol- 
ogy and doctoral concentrations in cultural/social anthropol- 
ogy; archaeology: and race, gender, and social justice. A 
Certificate in Public .\nthropolog>' is offered for both under- 
graduates and graduate students. All programs stress active, 
cooperative learning, for anthropology opens up many excit- 
ing questions for discussion and debate. 

Students are encouraged to leam outside the classroom, 
through intemships and job placements, field trips and experi- 
ential classes, and study abroad. Washington, D.C. offers 



many opportunities for students to broaden their learning 
through museums and research facilities and the rich community 
life of the city. Many anthropology majors choose to spend a se- 
mester abroad. With prior approval, the department accepts 
courses taken through AU Abroad as credit for the major. 

B.A. in Anthropology 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major by the department's under- 
graduate studies director requires a cumulative grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and a grade point average of 2.00 or 
higher in two anthropology courses. 

University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence fi-om each of 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 48 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Core Courses (24 credit hours) 

• ANTH-250 Human Ongins 5:2 (3) 

• ANTH-251 Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology (3) 

• ANTH-253 Introduction to Archaeology (3) 

• ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 

• ANTH-340 Contemporary Ethnographies (3) 

• ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) 

• ANTH-450 .Anthropology of Power (3) 

• ANTH-552 Anthropological Research Methods (3) 

Fieldwork (3 credit hours) 

• 3 credits from the following: 

ANTH-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3-9) 
ANTH-491 Intemship in Anthropology (1-6) 
ANTH-550 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 
ANTH-560 Summer Field School: Archaeology (3-9) 



Anthropology 77 



Other fieldwork. including study abroad programs or 
community service learning projects, may be used with the 
approval of the student's advisor 
Elective Courses (21 credit hours) 

• 2 1 credit hours from the following with a minimum of 1 2 
credit hours at the 300 level or above: 
ANTH-210 Roots of Racism and Interracial 

Harmony 3:2 (3) 
ANTH-2 1 5 Sex. Gender, and Cultui^ 3:2 (3) 
ANTH-220 Living in Multiculairal Societies 3:2 (3) 
ANTH-225 Language and Human Experience 1 :2 (3) 
ANTH-230 India: Its Living Traditions 3:2 (3) 
ANTH-235 Early Amenca: The Buried Past 2:2 (3) 
ANTH-334 Environmental Justice (3) 
ANTH-337 Anthropology of Genocide (3) 
ANTH-350 Special Topics (3) 
ANTH-430 Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion (3) 
ANTH-431 Taboos (3) 

ANTH-498 Senior Thesis in Anthropology (3-6) 
ANTH-531 Topics in Archaeology (3) 
ANTH-532 Changing Culture (3) 
ANTH-534 Class and Culture (3) 
ANTH-535 Ethnicity and Nationalism (3) 
ANTH-537 Topics in Language and Culuire (3) 
ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-543 Anthropology of Development (3) 
ANTH-544 Topics in Public Anthropology (3) 

University Honors Program 

AH University Honors students must complete at least 1 2 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-le\ el Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises sUidents in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 

Combined B.A. in Anthropology and M.A. in Public 
Anthropology 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The deparmient that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy' master's degree 
requirements. Bachelor's master's students must complete at 
least 18 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the 



bachelor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential 
enrollment in the two programs. 

This program allows qualified students to complete both the 
B.A. in Anthropology and the MA. in Public Anthropology. 
Requirements 

• The standards for admission to the undergraduate major must 
first be satisfied. Undergraduate majors ordinarily apply for 
admission to the combined B.A. /M.A. program at the end of 
their junior year. Admission decisions follow the procedures 
used to evaluate graduate applicants to the .M.A. program. 
Interest in this program should be discussed with members of 
the faculty before formal application is begun. 

• All requirements for the B.A. in Anthropology 
Undergraduate suidents may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work in anthropology to 
satisfy the requirements for both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in Public Anthropology, 
including a minimum of 18 credit hours completed in 
residence in graduate status after the undergraduate degree 
has been awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Anthropology 

• 1 8 credit hours w ith grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ANTH-251 Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology (3) 

• Two courses fi^om the following: 
ANTH-250 Human Origins 5:2 (3) 
ANTH-253 Introduction to Archaeology (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 

• An additional 9 credit hours at the 300 level or above chosen 
in consultation with an advisor 

Minor in Public Anthropology 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 1 2 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ANTH-251 Perspectives in Culmral Anthropology (3) 

• ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropolog>- (3) (taken 
after completion of at least 6 credit hours in anthropology) 

• An additional 1 2 credit hours with at least 9 credit hours at the 
300 level or above, chosen from at least two subfields 
(socio-cultural. linguistic, archaeological, physical) in 
consultation with an advisor. 

Undergraduate Certificate in Public 
Anthropology 

Admission to the Program 

Open to undergraduate degree and nt)ndegree students. Stu- 
dents must complete 6 credit hours w ith grades of C or better in 



78 College of Arts and Sciences 



anthropology courses at the 200 level or above, or have intern- 
ship experience in a related field before beginning course work 
for the certificate. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of appro\ed course work with at least 9 credit 
hours at the 300-level or above, with grades of C or better. 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fiiifillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3 .0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 12 credit 
hours each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 
credit hours earned at an accredited college or university 
may be applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• ANTH-541 Anthropology and State Policy (3) 
or 

ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 

• 12 credit hours in public anthropology courses at the 300 
level or above, chosen in consultation with the student's 
faculty advisor. 

M.A. in Public Anthropology 

Admission to the Program 

Applicants must meet the minimum universit>' require- 
ments for admission to graduate study. Admission is based on 
academic record, two academic letters of reference, and an ex- 
ample of the applicant's work, e.g., a term paper. Graduate Re- 
cord Examination (GRE) scores are required. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hoiu^ of approved graduate work 

Students focus their studies in either cultural/social 
anthropology or archaeology 

• One written comprehensive examinarioru appropriate to the 
student's concentration 

• A thesis or nonthesis option of two substanfial research 
papers prepared in conjunction with advanced courses or 
research seminars, read and approved by two faculty 
members and the department chair 

Tracks 

Cultural/Social Anthropology or Archeology 

Course Requirements 

• ANTH-552 .Anthropological Research Methods (3) 

• ANTH-632 Contemporary Theory: Culture, Power, 

History (3) 
Cultural/Social Anthropology 

• 1 8 credit hours from the following as approved by the 
student's advisor, with no more than 6 credit hours 
from ANTH-691 and ANTH-797: 



ANTH-53 1 Topics in Archaeology (3) 
ANTH-532 Changing Culture (3) 
ANTH-534 Class^and Culture (3) 
ANTH-535 Ethnicity and Nationalism (3) 
ANTH-53 7 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
ANTH-541 Anthropology and State Policy (3) 
ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-543 Anthropology of Development (3) 
ANTH-544 Topics in Public Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-550 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 
ANTH-63 1 Foundations of Social and Cultural 

Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-634 Foundations of Archaeology (3) 
ANTH-635 Race. Gender and Social Justice (3) 
ANTH-63 7 Discourse, Narrafive. and Text (3) 
ANTH-640 Current Issues in Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-691 Intemshipin Anthropology (1-6) 
ANTH-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (6) (thesis oprion) 

6 credits hours of approved graduate course work from another 
discipline, such as history, sociology, communication, or 
international service. 

Archeology 

ANTH-533 Cultural Resources Management (3) or 

ANTH-536 Archaeology and Politics (3) 

ANTH-634 Foundations of Archaeology (3) 

12 credit hours from the following as approved by the 

student's advisor. Students without field archaeology 

experience are strongly encouraged to take ANTH-560 

Summer Field School: Archaeology: 

ANTH-53 1 Topics in Archaeology (3) 

ANTH-532 Changing Culture (3) 

ANTH-533 Cultural Resources Management (3) (if not 

taken to meet requirement above) 
ANTH-534 Class and Culture (3) 
ANTH-535 Ethnicity and Nationalism (3) 
ANTH-536 Archaeology and Politics (3) (if not taken to 

meet requirement above) 
ANTH-537 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
ANTH-541 Anthropology and State Policy (3) 
ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-543 .Anthropology of Development (3) 
ANTH-544 Topics in Pubhc Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-550 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 
ANTH-560 Summer Field School: Archaeology (3-9) 
ANTH-590 Independent Reading m Anthropology ( 1-6) 
ANTH-63 1 Foundations of Social and Cultural 

Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
ANTH-637 Discourse. Narrative, and Text (3) 
ANTH-639 Culture Area Analysis (3) 
ANTH-640 Current Issues in Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-690 Independent Study Project in Anthropology (1-6) 
ANTH-691 Intemship in Anthropology (1-6) 



Anthropology 79 



ANTH-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (6) (thesis option) 

• 6 credit hours of approved graduate course work from another 
discipline, such as history, sociology, communication, 
economics, mathematics and statistics, computer science, 
information systems, business, and public affairs. 

Graduate Certificate in Public 
Anthropology 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution. Students must complete 6 credit 
hours with grades of C or better in anthropology courses at the 
200 level or above, or have internship experience in a related 
field before beginning course work for the certificate. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the ftilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. Intemational students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• ANTH-541 Anthropology and State Policy (3) 
or 

ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours in graduate publ ic anthropology courses with 
at least 6 credit hours at the 600 level or above, chosen in 
consultation with the student's faculty advisor. 

Ph.D. in Anthropology 

Admission to the Program 

Applicants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for admission to graduate study. Admission is based on aca- 
demic record, two academic letters of reference, and an exam- 
ple of the applicant's work, e.g., a term paper. GRE scores 
should be sent directly to the department. 
Degree Requirements 

• 72 credit hours of approved graduate work 

Students entering the program with an M.A. in Anthropology 
earned elsewhere must complete at least 30 credit hours of 
course work and no more than 1 2 credit hours of dissertation 
credit in residence. 



• Two languages or one language and statistical or computer 
analysis as a tool of research 

• Four comprehensive examinations, at least two written and at 
least one oral 

• Dissertation and oral defense 

• Field work is a component of dissertation research 

Concentrations 

Cultural/Social Anthropology, Archeology, or Race, Gender, 
and Social Justice 

Course Requirements 

Cultural/Social Anthropology or Archeology 

• ANTH-631 Foundations of Social and Cultural 

Anthropology (3) 

• ANTH-634 Foundations of Archaeology (3) 

• ANTH-637 Discourse, Narrative, and Text (3) 

• ANTH-799 Doctoral Dissertation Seminar (6) 

Race, Gender, and Social Justice 

• ANTH-632 Contemporary Theory: Culture, Power and 

History (3) 

• ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours in race, gender, and social justice course work 
from the following, chosen in consultation with the student's 
advisor: 

ANTH-53 1 Topics in Archaeology : 

Archaeology and Politics (3) 
ANTH-532 Changing Culture (3) 
ANTH-535 Ethnicity and Nationalism (3) 
ANTH-53 7 Topics in Language and Culture: 

Language, Culture, and Education (3) 
ANTH-541 Anthropology and State Policy (3) 
ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-544 Topics in Public Anthropology : 

Environmental Justice (3) 

Human Rights (3) 
ANTH-637 Discourse, Narrative, and Text (3) 
ANTH-640 Current Issues in Anthropology (3) 

• 1 5 credit hours of course work from at least two other 
teaching units, including the Departments of Justice, Law and 
Society; History; and Sociology; and the School of 
hitemational Service 

• ANTH-691 Intemshipin Anthropology (3) or other 
practical experience in race, gender and social justice 

• ANTH-799 Doctoral Dissertation Seminar (6) including a 
3-credit hour capstone seminar in race, gender and social 
justice 



80 Collegeof Arts and Sciences 



Arab Studies 



The interdisciplinary program in Arab studies draws on the 
distinguished faculty in the College of the Arts and Sciences, 
School of International Service, and School of Public Affairs 
who teach courses related to the Arab world. In both the minor 
and undergraduate certificate, students take two core courses 
that introduce the scholarly study of Islam and the modem his- 
tory and contemporary sociology of the Arab world. Five other 
courses are selected from history, culture, and society, and in- 
ternational studies. For the certificate, students also take two 
courses in Arabic. 

Minor in Arab Studies 

Admission to tlie Program 

Formal admission to the minor requires a minimum grade 
point average of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and approval of the pro- 
gram advisor. 
Requirements 

• 2 1 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 1 2 
credit hours unique to the minor and at least 9 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• SIS-245 The World of Islam .1:2 (3) 

• SOCY-225Contemporai7 Arab World 3:2 (3) 

• Five courses from the following, with at least one selected 
from each group: 

History, Culture, and Society 
ANTH-339 Culhire Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
ECON-358 Economics of the World Regions: 

The Arab Economies (3) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
HIST-248 Transfomiations of the Middle East (3) 
SOCY-53 1 Regional Studies in Social Change (3) (topics) 

International Studies 
SIS-264 Contemporary Middle East (3) 
SIS-365 Arab-Israeli Relations (3) 
SlS-571 International Relations of the Middle East 1 (3) 



Undergraduate Certificate in 

Arab Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Open to undergraduate degree and nondegree students. 
CertiHcate Requirements 

• 29 credit hours of approved course work with at least 1 5 
credit hours at the 300-level or above with grades of C or 
better 

Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the ftilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. Intemational students must enroll in 1 2 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 6 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 
Course Requirements 

• SlS-245TheWorldoflslam3:2(3) 

• SOCY-225 Contemporary Arab World 3:2 (3) 

• Five courses from the following, with at least one selected 
from each group: 

History, Culture, and Society 
ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
ECON-358 Economics of the World Regions: 

The Arab Economies (3) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
HlST-248 Transformations of the Middle East (3) 
SOCY-53 1 Regional Studies in Social Change (3) (topics) 

International Studies 
SIS-264 Contemporary Middle East (3) 
SIS-365 Arab-Israeli Relations (3) 
SIS-571 Intemational Relafions of the Middle East I (3) 

• Two courses from the following with grades of C or better: 

ARAB- 102 Arabic Elementary I (4) 
ARAB- 103 Arabic Elementary 11 (4) 
ARAB-202 Arabic Intermediate 1 (4) 
ARAB-203 Arabic Intermediate II (4) 



Art 



Art 81 



Chair Helen Langa 

FuU-Time Faculty 

University Professor Emeritus B.L. Summerford 

Professor Emeritus/a M.D. Garrard, S. Lewis, M. Oxman, 

S. Pace, L. Penay 

Professor N. Broude, D. Kimes 

Associate Professor Emeritus/a M. Graham, M. Hirano, 

C. Ravenal 

Associate Professor Z. Charlton, T. Doud, D. Kahn, 

H. Langa, C. Montes, L. Silva 

Assistant Professor J. Bellow, K. Butler, A. Holtin, 

I. Manalo, K. Resnick, 1. Sakellian 

The Department of Art encompasses the creative activities 
of the fine arts (painting, sculpture, printmaking, and 
multimedia), the artistic applications of design, and the theoreti- 
cal and historical concerns of art history. These complementary 
programs flinction together, so that the student gains not only 
depth of knowledge in a chosen specialty but also the breadth of 
experience that yields understanding of artistic traditions, val- 
ues, cultural awareness, and contemporary issues. A faculty of 
exhibiting artists, practicing designers, published and respected 
historians, and strong studio programs focused on giving stu- 
dents facility with materials and familiarity with visual and the- 
oretical concepts make the art department, in effect, an art 
school within a university. 

The Art Department offers the Bachelor of Arts in Art His- 
tory, Graphic Design, or Studio Art, all of which can also be 
taken as minors, a Bachelor of Fine Arts, and M.F.A. in Studio 
Art. 

The study of art awakens the ability to undertake a serious 
exploration of visual form, opens the mind to the special mean- 
ings encoded in visual language, and develops the creative, ex- 
pressive, and analytic abilities inherent in all people. In studio 
courses, students learn to see with acuity, to explore forms in 
nature or from the imagination, and to make images that are for- 
mally coherent and personally expressive. In art history 
courses, students are introduced to the art of civilizations past 
and present, leam how to interpret works of art critically and 
historically, and discover how art functions both to reflect and 
to shape social values. In graphic design courses, students de- 
velop an understanding of the dynamic power of visual imagery 
and leam to apply their knowledge of the formal elements of art 
to the production of effective graphic communication. 

American University's Katzen Arts Center provides stu- 
dents with a state of the art facility for the investigation and pur- 
suit of both the visual and performing arts. The Art 
Department's offices, classrooms, and studios are equipped for 
the instruction of drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, de- 
sign, computer graphics, multimedia, and ceramics. 

As well as multiple performance stages and a full array of 
classroom and studio facilities, the Katzen Arts Center contains 



more than 30,000 square feet of gallery space and an impressive 
museum including the Watkins and Katzen collections, with 
works by Avery, Chagall, Dove, Klee, Kokoshka, Marin. 
Matisse, and Picasso, and a vital rotating schedule of exhibi- 
tions. The many world-class museums in Washington, D.C. 
also form an integral component of students' experience at 
American University. 

In addition to the full-time faculty, each year the studio pro- 
gram brings nationally and internationally distinguished visit- 
ing artists-in-residence to the department, including Olive 
Ayhens, Gregory Amenoff, Frances Barth, Jake Bertlot, 
Susanna Coffey, Diana Cooper, Stuart Diamond, Tara Dono- 
van, Andrew Forge, Sam Gilliam, Judy Glantzman, Glenn 
Goldberg, Margaret Grimes, Diana Guerrero-Macia, Bill 
Jensen, Shirley Kaneda, Catherine Murphy, Judy Pfatf, Kather- 
ine Porter, Hanneline Rogeberg, Roger Tibbetts, Tracy Miller, 
James Sheehan, Pat Steir, John Walker, Stephan Westfall, and 
others. 

An internationally-prominent art history faculty and strong 
curriculum give the art history major a solid grounding in art as 
a historical and humanistic discipline in an environment that 
provides continuing contact with art in the making. Because of 
the university's location in one of the major art capitals of the 
world and its proximity to Washington's great museums and art 
collections, all programs afford students the advantage of im- 
mediate experience with art masterpieces of the past and pres- 
ent. 

The design curriculum is highly stmctured and sequential to 
provide students with the theory and practice of graphic com- 
munications design applicable to many purposes, as well as the 
development of professional production methods. Courses cov- 
er publication and editorial design, corporate identity, packag- 
ing, illustration, poster design, multimedia, experience and 
interactive design, etc. Along with creative and technical skills, 
verbal and analytical abilities are developed through class cri- 
tiques. Through intemships with designers working in the field, 
students leam to balance the ideal creative solution with the re- 
ality of budget constraints, technical limitations, and deadlines. 

An important objective of the department is to prepare stu- 
dents for careers in the arts. Given the sound theoretical and 
technical bases of our programs, graduates find that a wealth of 
individual career opportunities awaits them. Depending on the 
specific discipline pursued, they have become professional 
painters and sculptors, teachers, critics, graphic designers, illus- 
trators, and exhibition design specialists. Graduates also go on 
to careers in museum and gallery work, visual resources, and 
historic preservation. 



82 College of Arts and Sciences 



B.A. in Art History 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires satisfactory com- 
pletion (grades of C or better) of 12 credit hours of art history 
courses and departmental approval. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hoiu^ 

• 6credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total of ten courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence from 
each of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 54 credit hours with grades of C or better 

24 of the last 30 credit hours in the major program must be 
taken in residence, 1 8 credit hours of which must be in art 
histoiy and 6 credit hours in related fields or studio. 
Internships in local agencies, museums, galleries, and 
libraries are permitted with departmental approval, but are 
limited to 3 credit hours unless taken as electives. 
Course Requirements 

• ARTH-105 Art: The Historical Experience 1:1 (3) 

• ARTH-210 Modem Art: Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries 1:2(3) 

• ARTH-500 Approaches to Art History (3) 

• 3 credit hours in each of four periods: 
Ancient 

ARTH-396 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 
ARTH-520 Seminar in Art History (3) (appropriate topic) 
ARTH-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 

Medieval 

ARTH-303 Medieval Art (3) 

ARTH-308 Gothic Art (3) 

ARTH-396 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 

ARTH-520 Seminar in Art History (3) (appropriate topic) 

ARTH-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 

Renaissance 

ARTH-205An of the Renaissance 2:2 (3) 
ARTH-396 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 
ARTH-513 Italian Painting: Early Renaissance (3) 
ARTH-514 Italian Painting: High Renaissance (3) 
ARTH-514 Italian Painting: Late Renaissance (3) 
ARTH-520 Seminar in Art History (3) (appropriate topic) 
ARTH-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 



Modern 

ARTH-33 1 Visual Arts in the United States to 1 890 (3) 
ARTH-332 Visual Arts in the United States; 

1890 to 1935(3) 
ARTH-333 Visual Arts in the United States: 

1935 to 1970 (3) 
ARTH-334 Contemporary Visual Art and 

Postmodernism (3) 
ARTH-396 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 
ARTH-508 Painting: Rococo through Impressionism (3) 
ARTH-5 10 Painting: Post-Impressionism to Expressionism (3) 
ARTH-5 1 1 Painting: Cubism through Surrealism (3) 
ARTH-520 Seminar in Art History (3) (appropriate topic) 
ARTH-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 

• 15 additional credit hours in art history with at least two 
courses at the 500 level 

• 6 credit hours in studio from the following: 
ARTS- 1 00 Art: The Studio Experience 1:1(3) 
ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 1 :2 (3) 
ARTS-210 The Artist's Perspecfive: Painting 1 :2 (3) 
ARTS-215 The Artist's Perspecfive: Sculpture 1:2 (3) 
ARTS-320 Painting SUidio (3) 

ARTS-340 Sculpture SUidio (3) 
ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 
ARTS-363 Relief Printmaking Studio (3) 

• 12 credit hours at the 300 level or above from one of the 
following fields: American studies, anthropology, history, 
literature, music, or philosophy. Course selections must be 
related to the major and to each other and must be approved by 
the faculty. 

Note: Students contemplating graduate study in art history are 
advised to attain a reading knowledge of French, Italian, or 
German to the intermediate level (or equivalent of 12 credit 
hours at the college level). 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors smdents must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the department. 
Each department has three levels of University Honors require- 
ments: Level 1 Oprions ( 100-200-level Honors classes); Level II 
Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and Level 111 Op- 
tions (Honors Senior Capstone). The department Honors coordi- 
nator advises students in the University Honors Program 
regarding departmental options. For more information, go to 
www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 



Art 83 



gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisty master's degree re- 
quirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 



B.A. in Graphic Design 



Admission to tlie Program 

Formal admission to the major requires satisfactory comple- 
tion (grades of C+ or better) of the following foundation 
courses: 

GDES-200 Introduction to Graphic Design (3) 

GDES-210 Introduction to Typography (3) 

GDES-220 Computer Literacy for Design (3) 

COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 
Universitj' Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 54 credit hours with grades of C or better 

24 of the last 30 credit hours in the major program must be 
taken in residence, of which 1 8 credit hours must be in design 
and 3 credit hours in art history or studio. 
All students will submit a portfolio for departmental 
evaluation prior to beginning their senior year. The 
department may issue formal warnings to students 
performing at marginal levels. 

Tracks 

Print Media or Experience Design and Multimedia 

Course Requirements 

• ARTH-l05An: The Historical Experience 1:1 (3) 

• COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

• GDES-200 Introduction to Graphic Design (3) 

• GDES-210 Introduction to Typography (3) 

• GDES-220 Computer Literacy for Design (3) 

• GDES-230 Graphic Design History (3) 

• GDES-300 Intermediate Typography (3) 



Print Media 

• GDES-3 10 Print Design and the Computer (3) 

• GDES-320 Design and Photography (3) 

• GDES-400 Advanced Design L Systems Design (3) 

• GDES-420 Advanced Design IL Narrative Design (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 

GDES-3 1 5 Experience Design and the Computer (3) 

GDES-325 Kinetic and Sequential Graphics (3) 

GDES-350 Illustration (3) 

GDES^OS User Experience Design I (3) 

GDES^25 User E.xperience Design II (3) 

GDES^SO Packaging Design (3) 

GDES-490 Independent Study Project (1-6) w ith 

department appro\ al 
GDES^91 Internship (1-6) with department approval 

• 1 2 credit hours from the following, with at least 3 credit hours 
from each set of courses: 

Set One 

ARTS-100 Art: The Studio Experience 1 : 1 (3) 

ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 1:2 (3) 

ARTS-210 The Artist's Perspective: Painting 1 :2 (3) 

ARTS-215 The Artist's Perspective: Sculpture 1:2 (3) 

ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 

ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 

ARTS-344 Ceramics Studio (3) 

ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 

ARTS-363 Relief Printmaking Studio (3) 

ARTS-364 Intaglio Studio (3) 

ARTS-520 Advanced Printmaking (3) 
Set Two 

ARTH-205Art of the Renaissance 2:2 (3) 

ARTH-210 Modem Art: Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Centuries 1:2 (3) 

ARTH-2 1 5 Architecture: Washmgton and the World 1:2 (3) 
Set Three 

COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication. (3) 

COMM-523 Intermediate Photography (3) 

COMM-525 Advanced Photography (3) 

COMM-529 Large Format Photography and Studio 

Lighting (3) 
Experience Design and Multimedia 

• GDES-3 1 5 Experience Design and the Computer (3) 

• GDES-325 Kinetic and Sequential Graphics (3) 

• GDES-405 User Experience Design I (3) 

• GDES-425 User Experience Design II (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 
GDES-3 1 Print Design and the Computer (3) 
GDES-320 Design and Photography (3) 
GDES-350 Illustration (3) 

GDES-400 Advanced Design I: Systems Design (3) 
GDES-420 Advanced Design II: Narrative Design (3) 



84 College of Arts and Sciences 



GDES-450 Packaging Design (3) 

GDES-490 Independent Study Project (1-6) with 

department approval 
GDES-491 Internship (1-6) with department approval 

• 12 credit hours from the following, with at least 3 credit 
hours from each set of courses; 

Set One 

COMM-331 Film and Video Production I (3) (prerequisite: 

COMM-105 Visual Literacy) 
COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 
COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication. (3) 
COMM-435 Introduction to Studio Television (3) 
(prerequisite: COMM-105 Visual Literacy) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-523 Intermediate Photography (3) 
COMM-525 Advanced Photography (3) 
COMM-529 Large Format Photography and Studio 
Lighting (3) 

Set Two 

ATEC-101 Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) 
ATEC-102 Audio Technology Laboratory (I) 
CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 
CSC-28I Introduction to Computer Science 11 (3) 
CSC-435 Web Programming (3) 
PERF-1 10 Understanding Music 1 : 1 (3) 

Set Three 

ARTH-205 Art of the Renaissance 2:2 (3) 
ARTH-210 Modem Art: Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries 1:2(3) 
ARTH-2 15 Architecture: Washington and the World 1:2 (3) 
ARTS-100 Art: The Studio Experience 1:1 (3) 
ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawmg 1:2 (3) 
ARTS-210 The Artist's Perspective: Painting 1:2 (3) 
ARTS-215 The Artist's Perspective: Sculpture 1:2 (3) 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). Tlie department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to 
earn both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its ac- 
celerated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate stu- 
dents may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required 



for the graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements 
for both degree programs. The department that oversees the 
graduate program the student enters will determine if the courses 
the undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

B.A. in Studio Art 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires satisfactory comple- 
tion (grades of C or better) of 12 credit hours of studio courses 
and departmental approval. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each of 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 54-55 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Areas of Specialization 

Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Installation 
Course Requirements 

• ARTH-105 Alt: The Historical Experience 1 : 1 (3) 

• ARTH-2 1 Modem Art: Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries 1:2 (3) 

• ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 1:2 (3) 

• ARTS-210 The Artist's Perspective: Painting 1:2 (3) 

• ARTS-235 The Artist's Perspective; Multimedia (3) 

• ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 

• ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 

• ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) (9 credit hours total) 

• ARTS-363 Relief Printmaking Studio (3) 
or 

ARTS-364 Intaglio Studio (3) 

• ARTS-370 Composing with Media (3) 

• ARTS-400 Senior Seminar (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours from the following including 9 credit hours 
from the student's area of specialization and 3 credit hours 
from another area: 

ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 



Art 85 



ARTS-340 Sculpmre Studio (3) 
ARTS-344 Ceramics Studio (3) 
ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 
ARTS-363 Relief Printmaking Studio (3) 
ARTS-364 Intaglio Studio (3) 
ARTS-520 Advanced Printmaking ( 3 ) 
ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 
ARTS-561 Drawing Practicum II (3) 

• 3 credit hours in art history (ARTH) 
Area of Specialization 

Multimedia 
Course Requirements 

• ARTH- 1 05 Art: The Historical Experience 1:1 (3) 

• ARTH-2 10 Modem Art: Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries 1 :2 (3) 

• ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 1 :2 (3) 

• ARTS-235 The Artist's Perspective: Multimedia (3) 

• ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 

• ARTS-370 Composing with Media (3) 

• ARTS-400 Senior Seminar ( 3 ) 

• ARTS-410 Multimedia Seminar (3) (9 credit hours total) 

• ATEC-IOI Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) 

• ATEC-102 Audio Technology Laboratory ( I ) 

• COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

• COMM-331 Film and Video Production I (3) 

• COMM-350 Digital Imaging (3) 

• COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 

• GDES-220 Computer Literacy for Design (3) 

• GDES-3 1 5 Experience Design and the Computer (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 
Art history (ARTH) course (3) 
COMM-100 Understanding Media 4: 1 (3) 
COMM-105 Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 
COMM-209 Communication and Society (3) 
COMM-511 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-5 1 6 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3): 

The Radical Image 
COMM-5 1 7 History of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 History of Photography (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
PHIL-230 Meaning and Purpose in the Arts 1 :2 (3 ) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 1 2 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 



Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edti/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the program is subject to the approval 
of a portfolio, evaluation of the academic record, and a personal 
interview. Admission depends entirely on faculty action result- 
ing from this review. Consideration for the B.F.A. is pemiitted 
only after 1 8 credit hours or tliree semesters of studio work have 
been completed at American University but before beginning 
the senior year. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 72-73 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Areas of Specialization 

Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Installation 
Course Requirements 

• ARTH-105 Art; The Historical Experience 1:1 (3) 

• ARTH-2 10 Modem Art; Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries 1:2 (3) 

• ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 1 :2 (3) 

• ARTS-210 The Artist's Perspective: Painting 1:2 (3) 



86 College of Arts and Sciences 



• ARTS-235 The Artist's Perspective; Multimedia (3) 

• ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 

• ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 

• ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) (9 credit hours total) 

• ARTS-363 Relief Printmaking Studio (3) 
or 

ARTS-364 hitaglio Studio (3) 

• ARTS-370 Composing with Media (3) 

• ARTS-400 Senior Seminar (3) 

• ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 

• ARTS-561 Drawing Practicum II (3) 

• 24 credit hours from the following including 1 8 credit hours 
from the student's area of specialization and 6 credit hours 
from another area: 

ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 
ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 
ARTS-344 Ceramics Studio (3) 
ARTS-360 Drawing SUjdio (3) 
ARTS-363 Relief Printmaking Studio (3) 
ARTS-364 Intaglio Studio (3) 
ARTS-520 Advanced Printmaking (3) 
ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 
ARTS-561 Drawing Practicum II (3) 

• 3 credit hours in art history (ARTH) 
Area of Specialization 

Multimedia 
Course Requirements 

• ARTH- 105 Art: The Historical Experience 1:1 (3) 

• ARTH-210 Modem Art: Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries 1 :2 (3) 

• ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 1:2 (3) 

• ARTS-235 The Artist's Perspective: Multimedia (3) 

• ARTS-360 Drawing Smdio (3) 

• ARTS-370 Composing with Media (3) 

• ARTS-400 Senior Seminar (3) 

• ARTS-410 Multimedia Seminar (3) (9 credit hours total) 

• ATEC-101 Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) 

• ATEC- 1 02 Audio Technology Laboratory ( 1 ) 

• COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

• COMM-33 1 Film and Video Production I (3) 

• COMM-350 Digital Imaging (3) 

• COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 

• GDES-220 Computer Literacy for Design (3) 

• GDES-3 1 5 Experience Design and the Computer (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

ARTS-210 The Artist's Perspective: Painting 1:2 (3) 
ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 
ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 



ARTS-344 Ceramics Studio (3) 
ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
Art history (ARTH) course (3) 
COMM- 1 00 Understanding Media 4: 1 (3) 
COMM-105 Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 
COMM-209 Communication and Society (3) 
COMM-5 1 1 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-5 1 7 History of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 History of Photography (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
PHIL-230 Meaning and Purpose in the Arts 1 :2 (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 
ATEC-321 Sound Synthesis I (3) 
ATEC-3 1 1 Sound Studio Techniques 1(3) 
COMM-434 Film and Video Production II (3) 
COMM-5 1 6 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3): 

The Radical Image 

GDES-210 Introduction to Typography (3) 

GDES-325 Kinetic and Sequential Graphics (3) 

GDES-405 User Experience Design I (3) 

LIT-346 Topics in Film (3) (approved topic) 

PERF-1 10 Understanding Music 1:1 (3) 

PERF- 1 1 5 Theatre: Principles, Plays, and 
Performance 1:1 (3) 

PERF-260 Production I: Stagecraft (3) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Smdents may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the department. 
Each department has three levels of University Honors require- 
ments: Level I Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); Level II 
Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and Level III Op- 
tions (Honors Senior Capstone). The department Honors coordi- 
nator advises students in the University Honors Program 
regarding departmental options. For more information, go to 
www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 



Art 87 



rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Art History 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ARTH-105 Art: The Historical Experience 1:1 (3) 

• ARTH-2 10 Modem Art: Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Centuries 1:2 (3) 

• 3 credit hours at the 200 or 300 level and 9 credit hours at the 300 
level or above, approved in advance by an art history advisor 

Minor in Graphic Design 

• 2 1 -22 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

• GDES-200 Introduction to Graphic Design (3) 

• GDES-210 Introduction to Typography (3) 

• GDES-220 Computer Literacy for Design (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 
GDES-230 Graphic Design History (3) 
GDES-300 Intermediate Typography (3) 
GDES-3 1 Pnnt Design and the Computer (3) 
GDES-3 1 5 Experience Design and the Computer (3) 
GDES-320 Design and Photography (3) 
GDES-325 Kinetic and Sequential Graphics (3) 
GDES-350 Illustration (3) 

GDES-400 Advanced Design I: Systems Design (3) 
GDES-405 User Experience Design 1 (3) 
GDES-420 Advanced Design II: Narrative Design (3) 
GDES-425 User E.xperience Design 11 (3) 
GDES-450 Packaging Design (3) 

Minor in Studio Art 

• 2 1 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Specific requirements depend on the student's interest and 
area of concentration, which may include drawing, painting, 
printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, installation, or multimedia. 
Course Requirements 

• 2 1 credit hours from the following approved in advance by a 
studio faculty advisor: 

ARTS-100 Art: The Studio Experience 1 : 1 (3) 
ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 1 :2 (3) 
ARTS-210 The Artist's Perspective: Painting 1 :2 (3) 
ARTS-215 The Artist's Perspective: Sculpture 1:2 (3) 
ARTS-320 Painting Smdio (3) 
ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 
ARTS-344 Cerainics Suidio (3) 



ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 
ARTS-363 Relief Pnntmaking Studio (3) 
ARTS-364 Intaglio Studio (3) 
ARTS-520 Advanced Printmaking (3) 
ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 
ARTS-561 Drawing Practicum n (3) 
or 

• 22 credit hours from the following multimedia courses: 
ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 1 :2 (3) 
ARTS-235 The Artist's Perspective: Multimedia (3) 
ARTS-370 Composing with Media (3) 
ATEC-101 Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) and 

ATEC- 1 02 Audio Technology Laboratory ( 1 ) 
COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 
COMM-331 Film and Video Production 1 (3) 
GDES-220 Computer Literacy for Design (3) 

M.A. in Art History 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants should hold a bachelor of 
arts degree from an accredited college or university. Students 
whose records indicate a strong aptitude for graduate study, but 
whose undergraduate major was not in art history, will be re- 
quired to complete at least 24 credit hours of art history before 
being considered for admission to the graduate program. Ad- 
mission is based on academic record. Graduate Record Exami- 
nation (GRE) scores, and two letters of recommendation (if the 
undergraduate degree was not earned in the department). 

At the department's discretion, students who have com- 
pleted at least 1 8 credit hours of art history may be considered 
for admission and, if admitted, may complete the 6 credit hour 
deficiency during the course of their M.A. program. 

Part-time students are advised that an M.A., which takes at 
least three semesters of fiill-time study, cannot be completed at 
night or in summer only. 
Special Opportunities 

Individually structured programs in museum training and 
internships in local museums, galleries, agencies, or libraries 
are available for qualified students with departmental approval. 
Curriculum Models 

Curriculum Model I: General History of Western Art. A dis- 
cipline-oriented approach for students who intend to continue 
for a Ph.D. elsewhere or to teach at the high school or junior 
college level. The program emphasizes a range of art history 
courses with a conventional period specialization. 

Curriculum Model 11: Applied Research in Art History: A 
practical-applications approach with intensive training in re- 
search and writing for students who seek special training for 
museum work, architectural survey, historic preservation re- 
search, etc. The program may include related course work in 
history, culture. American studies, etc., as well as internships 
and field expenence. 

Curriculum Model HI: Concepts of Art and Art History. A 
problem-oriented approach aimed at depth of understanding of 



College of Arts and Sciences 



art and methods of art history, for students interested in 
connoisseurship and critical analysis, generally with an em- 
phasis in painting. The program may include related courses 
such as ARTS-700 Criticism of Painting, as well as independ- 
ent reading courses in criticism, theory, or historiography. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate work 

A 36-credit hour program with a structured museum 
internship option is available to qualified students. 

• Tool of research: intermediate-level French, German, or 
Italian, or reading knowledge of one of these languages 
demonstrated through examination 

• Ad\'ancement to candidacy after completion of 1 8 credit 
hours with a grade point average of 3.00 or higher (on a 4.00 
scale) and satisfactory completion of the tool requirement 

• Two written examinations: 

History of Western Art (Greek to Modem) 
One in the student's field of specialization: medieval art. 
Renaissance art, baroque and rococo art, nineteenth and 
twentieth century art, or art in the United States 

• Two substantial research papers in lieu of a thesis; at least 
one paper must originate in a graduate seminar and one must 
be in the student's field of specialization. 

Course Requirements 

• ARTH-500 Approaches to Art History (3) 

• ARTH-792 Research Seminar in Art History (3) 

• ARTH-793 Directed Research in Art History (3) or 
ARTH-690 Independent Smdy (3) 

• 9 credit hours in the field of specialization 

• Remaining 12 credit hours as approved 

Note: 6 additional credit hours of course work are required if 
museum training or more than one internship is selected. 

M.F.A. in Studio Art 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants should hold a Bachelor of 
Arts (with a major in Fine Arts) or a Bachelor of Fine Arts. Un- 
der special circumstances, applicants without a B.A. or B.F.A. 
degree or without a major in Fine Arts, but with outstanding 
artistic or professional qualifications, may be considered for 
admission. 

Admission is based on academic record, two letters of rec- 
ommendation, and a portfolio of at least twenty slides, includ- 
ing examples of drawings. A resume of the applicant's 
background should be included in the portfolio. Slide portfo- 
lios should be sent directly to the Department of Art. Tlie de- 
partment cannot be liable for loss or damage or for any 
transportation or mailing expense. 



Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work 

Additional studio (or art history) courses may be required to 
attain maturity and proficiency and to complete satisfactorily 
the comprehensives and thesis. The number and kinds of 
additional courses will be stipulated by the admissions 
committee at the time of admission. 

• One public oral examination after completion of each semester 
of ARTS-797 Master's Thesis Seminar and mandatory 
attendance at all M.F.A. in Suidio Art public oral examinations 

• A thesis exhibition of original works of art in the student's area 
of specialization executed independently by the student in 
consultation with a thesis committee of two or three faculty 
members. Written and photographic documentation of 
approved thesis is also required. 

• Mandatory attendance at all visiting artist lectures and 
critiques 

Course Requirements 
Areas of Specialization 
Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpttare, or Installation 

• ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 

• ARTS-561 Drawing Practicum II (3) 

• ARTS-600 Twentieth Century Art Theory (3) 

• ARTS-601 Contemporary Art Theory (3) 

• ARTS-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (3 ) ( 1 2 credit hours 

total) 

• 3 credit hours Irom the following: 
graduate art history (ARTH) course 
ARTS-610 Multimedia Seminar (3) 
COMM-511 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-517 History of Cross-Culuiral Cinema (3) . 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 History of Photography (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 

• 6 credit hours fi-om the following sttjdio courses: 
ARTS-520 Advanced Printmaking (3) 
ARTS-530 Advanced Sculpttire (3) 
ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 
ARTS-561 Drawing Practicum II (3) 
ARTS-670 Composing with Media (3) 

• 3 credit hours irom other graduate course approved by the 
department chair 

Area of Specialization 
Multimedia 

• ARTS-600 Twentieth Centtuy Art Theory (3) 

• ARTS-601 Contemporary Art Theory (3) 

• ARTS-610 Multimedia Seminar (3) (6 credit hours total) 

• ARTS-797 Master's Thesis Seminar ( 3 ) ( 1 2 credit 

hours total) 

• COMM-5 1 6 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3): 

The Radical Image 



Asian Studies 89 



approved graduate course (3) 
3 credit hours from the following: 
graduate art history (ARTH) course 
COMM-5 1 1 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-517 History of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 History of Photography (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 



• 3 credit hours from the following: 
ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 
ARTS-561 Drawing Practicum II (3) 
COMM-631 Fihn and Video Production I (3) 
COMM-634 Film and Video Production 11 (3) 
COMM-650 Digital Imaging (3) 
COMM-652 Web Studio (3) 
COMM-654 Motion Graphics and Efifects I (3) 



Asian Studies 



Coordinator Quansheng Zhao, Director, Center for Asian 
Studies and Professor, School of International Service 

The Asian Studies certificate is an interdisciplinary program 
involving courses taught by faculty from across the university. 

Undergraduate Certificate in 

Asian Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Open to undergraduate degree and nondegree students. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with at least 9 credit 
hours at the 300-level or above, with grades of C or better. 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 12 credit 
hours each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 
credit hours earned at an accredited college or university may 
be applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

• Capstone: successfijl completion of a 3-credit hour Asian 
studies research project conducted under the supervision of 
an Asian studies faculty member An independent study or 
Honors Capstone paper may be used to fulfill this 
requirement. 

• Students must complete at least one year of language courses 
or the equivalent in Chinese, Hindi, or Japanese, or other 
languages with approval of the faculty advisor. 

Course Requirements 

Gateway Requirement 

• One of the following: 
HIST-347 Asian Studies (3) (topics) 

PHIL-313 Studies in Asian Philosophy (3) (topics) 

SIS-16I Civilizations of Asia (3) 

SlS-567 Intemational Relations of East Asia (3) 



Concentration 

• 9 credit hours from the following with at least one course 
from a department other than the one in which the student has 
a primary focus: 

ANTH-230 hidia: Its Living Traditions 3:2 (3) 
HIST-347 Asian Studies (3) (topics) (if not used for 

Gateway requirement above) 
PHIL-313 Smdies in Asian Philosophy (3) (topics) (if not 

used for Gateway requirement above) 
RELG-185 Forms of the Sacred: Religions of the 

East 3: 1(3) 
RELG-210 Non-Westem Religious Traditions 3:2 (3) 
RELG-370Islam(3) 
RELG-373 Hinduism (3) 
SIS-I61 Civilizations of Asia (3) (if not used for Gateway 

requirement above) 
SIS-245 The World of Islam 3:2 (3) 
SIS-255 China, Japan and the United States 3:2 (3) 
SIS-560 Chinese Foreign Policy (3) 
SIS-561 Modem China (3) 
SIS-562 Polirical Economy of China (3) 
SIS-563 Japanese Foreign Policy (3) 
SIS-564 Chinese Politics (3) 
SIS-565 U.S. Economic Relations with Japan and 

China (3) 
SIS-567 Intemational Relations of East Asia (3) (if not used 

for Gateway requirement above) 

• Capstone (3) 

Graduate Certificate in Asian Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution. 
Certiflcate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work, with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or better. 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses will not be 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the cumulative grade point average. Students must have at 
least a 3 .0 grade point average in certificate courses in order to 
be awarded a certificate. 



90 College of Arts and Sciences 



Students in certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 
credit hours during each 12-month period after they are 
admitted. Intemational students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester. All programs must be completed within four 
years. A maxiinum of 3 credit hours earned at an accredited 
college or university may be applied toward the certificate as 
transfer credit. 

• Capstone: successfijl completion of a 3 credit-hour Asian 
studies research project conducted under the supervision of 
an Asian studies faculty member. A Substantial Research 
Paper (SRP) or graduate independent study may be used to 
fulfill this requirement. 

• Students must complete the Graduate Tool of Research 
Language E.xam. 

Course Requirements 
Gateway Requirement 

• One of the following; 
HIST-647 Asian Studies (3) (topics) 
PHIL-613 Studies in Asian Philosophy (3) (topics) 
SlS-567 Intemational Relations of East Asia (3) 



Concentration 

9 credit hours from the following with at least one course from 
a department other than the one in which the student has a 
primary focus: 
HIST-647 Asian Studies (3) (topics) (if not used for Gateway 

requirement above) 
PHIL-6 1 3 Smdies in Asian Philosophy (3) (topics) (if not 

used for Gateway requirement above) 
RELG-670 Islam (3) 
RELG-673 Hinduism (3) 
SIS-560 Chinese Foreign Policy (3) 
SIS-56I Modem China (3) 
SIS-562 Political Economy of China (3) 
SlS-563 Japanese Foreign Policy (3) 
SIS-564 Chinese Politics (3) 

SIS-565 U.S. Economic Relations with Japan and China (3) 
SIS-567 Intemational Relations of East Asia (3) (if not used 

for Gateway requirement above) 
SIS-676 Selected Topics in Cross-National Studies (3) 

(approved topic) 

Capstone (3) 



Biology 



Chair Victoria Connaughton 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a W.C. Banta, E.J. Breyere, 

B.J. Clarke, R.H. Fox 

Research Professor D. Boness, B. Chambers. 

M. Connaughton, F. Ferari, R. Fleischer, R. McCarron, 

M. O'Neil. J. Norcnburg, R. Taylor 

Associate Professor D. Carlini, V. Connaughton, 

D.W. Fong, C. Schaeft' 

Assistant Professor D. Angelini, K. De Cicco-Skinner, 

C. Tudge 



The Department of Biology provides courses in the life sci- 
ences, emphasizing advances in molecular genetics, embryol- 
ogy, development, and e\ olutionary biology. Faculty members 
conduct research in numerous areas including biodiversity, 
cave biology, cell biology, conservation biology, developmen- 
tal biology, evolutionary ecology, immunology, marine sci- 
ence, marine mammals, microbiology, molecular genetics, 
neurobiology, oceanography, and vertebrate vision. Students 
are encouraged to participate in research projects at all levels. 
Students also have the opportunity to visit, observe, and intern 
at some of the nation's most prestigious biological research 
centers, including the National Instimtes of Health (NIH), Na- 
tional Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Smithsonian Instini- 
tion. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National 
Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National 
Aquarium in Baltimore, and the National Zoo. 



The department has both undergraduate and graduate teach- 
ing laboratories as well as faculty research laboratories in which 
students are encouraged to learn. Students have the opportunity 
to gain experience with a wide variety of techniques including 
nucleic acid and protein isolation, DNA analysis and electropho- 
resis, bacterial and primary cell culture, stereo, compound, and 
fluorescent microscopy, and computer-assisted measurements 
with data analysis. The facilities of the Department of Biology 
such as the Digital Imaging Core Facility and cooperative agree- 
ments with various government laboratories make possible op- 
portunities for research in environmental, ecological, marine, 
and biomedical sciences. 

The Department of Biology offers the B.S. in Biology, B.S. 
in Marine Science, and the M.A. or M.S. in Biology. An under- 
graduate minor in biology is also a\ailable. The department pro- 
vides basic training in the life sciences, emphasizing modem 
advances in the areas of molecular genetics, embryology and de- 
velopment, and e\ olutionary biologv'. In addition to training for a 
career or graduate study in biology, students are prepared for 
medical, dental, and vetennarv' schools. The Department of Bi- 
ology offers courses that combine traditional education with the 
training necessary for today's professional marketplace. The 
curriculum is designed to allow individuals maximum choice of 
course selection after departmental requirements have been met. 

The graduate degree programs emphasize the development 
of research techniques. Research and teaching laboratories are 
well equipped and constantly upgraded. Students have the op- 
portunity to gain experience in scientific methods and experi- 
mental design in the laboratory and in the field. 



Biology 91 



The premedical programs of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, including a Postbaccalaureate Premedical Certificate, 
are available to help all undergraduate, postbaccalaureate, and 
graduate students who are considering a career in medicine or 
one of the allied health professions. For more information see 
Preprofessional Programs. 
Special Opportunities 
. Gloria Likins Scholarship for Undergraduate Women 

• Stephen C. Grebe Memorial Fund for Undergraduate 
Research 

• Teaching fellowships or assistantships 

• Helmlinge and Burhoe Awards for biology graduate stadents 

B.S. in Biology 

.Admission to the Program 

Admission is through formal declaration of major. The de- 
partment counsels freshmen and transfer students. 
University- Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 72 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Departmental Requirements 

• BIO-1 10 General Biology I 5:1 (4) 

• BIO-210 General Biology II 5:2 (4) 

• BIO-300 Cell Biology with Laboratory (4) 

• BIO-356 Genetics with Laboratory (5) 

• BIO-364 Involution (3 1 

• BIO-499 Senior Seminar in Biology (3) 

• I " ctcilii hi_uii> in biology or other courses approved by the 
department chair at the 300 level or above. No more than 3 
credit hours of a combination of BiO-390 Independent 
Reading, BIO-392 Cooperative Education, BIO-490 
Independent Study Project in Biology, or BIO-49I Internship 
may be counted toward this requirement. 

Related Requirements 

• CHEM-1 10 General Chemistry I 5:1 (4) 

• CHEM-210 General Chemistry II 5:2 (4) 

• CHEM-3 10 Organic Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-3 1 2 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory ( I ) 

• CHEM-320 Organic Chemistn/ n (3) 



• CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory ( I ) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 
or 

STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• PHYS-IIO University Physics I 5:1 (4) 

• PHYS-2I0 University Physics II 5:2 (4) 
Universit}' Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 1 2 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the Universit>- Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined B.S. and M.A. or M.S. in Biology 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at 
least 1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the 
bachelor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential 
enrollment in the two programs. 

This program enables qualified students to earn, in a contin- 
uous plan of study, both the B.S. in Biology and the M.A. or 
M.S. in Biology. 
Requirements 

• Undergraduate biology majors should apply for admission to 
the B.S./Master's program by the end of the junior year 
Admission is open to undergraduates whose overall grade 
point average and grade point average in biology course is 
3.00 or higher Applications must be accompanied by Uvo 
letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose, and 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. Each student's 
file must be approved by the department's Graduate Studies 
Committee prior to the end of the junior year to assure 
adequate time to complete degree requirements for the 
program. 

Students should discuss their interest in the program and their 
course schedules with members of the faculty before 
submitting a formal application. Interested students are 
encouraged to enroll in up to 3 credit hours of BIO-490 



92 College of Arts and Sciences 



Independent Study Project to conduct independent study 
research before applying. 

• Ail requirements for the B.S. in Biology 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work in biology, 
CHEM-560 Biochemistry I, and STAT-514 Statistical 
Methods to satisfy the requirements for both degrees. 

All requirements for the M.A. or M.S. in Biology, includ- 
ing a minimum of 1 8 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree require- 
ments within three years from the date of first enrollment in the 
master's program. 

B.S. in Marine Science 

Admission to the Program 

Admission to the program is through formal declaration of 
the major through the Department of Biology. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total of ten courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence from 
each of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 70 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• BIO-1 10 General Biology 1 5:1 (4) 

• BlO-210 General Biology II 5:2 (4) 

• BIO-420 Applied Oceanography with Laboratory (4) 

• CHEM-1 10 General Chemistry I 5:1 (4) 

• CHEM-210 General Chemistry II 5:2 (4) 

• CHEM-401 Geology (3) 

• CSC-310 Introduction to Geographic Information 

Systems (3) 

• ECON-100 Macroeconomics 4:1 (3) 

• ECON-200 Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

• ENVS-104 Issues in Marine Science 1(1) 

• ENVS-105 Issues in Marine Science 11 (2) 

• ENVS-360 Environment and the Atmosphere (3) 

• ENVS-492 Senior Capstone in Environmental Studies (3) 

• MATH-221 Calculus 1(4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 
or 

STAT-202 Ba ic Statistics (4) 



• One of the following: 

ECON-379 Economics of Environmental Policy (3) 

ENVS-582 Environmental Law (3) 

SIS-388 International Environmental Politics (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 
BlO-323 Introduction to Ecology (3) 
BIO-340 Marine Biology (3) 
BIO-342 Marine Mammals (3) 

BlO-425 Advanced Marine Ecology with Laboratory (4) 
BlO-520 Topics in Marine Zoology with Laboratory (4) 

• 9 credit hours at a marine field station with approval from the 
marine science program advisor 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the department. 
Each department has three levels of University Honors require- 
ments: Level 1 Options (100-200-level Honors classes); Level II 
Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and Level 111 Op- 
tions (Honors Senior Capstone). The department Honors coordi- 
nator advises students in the University Honors Program 
regarding departmental options. For more information, go to 
www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Biology 

• 28 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• BIO- 1 1 General Biology I 5 : 1 (4) 

• BIO-2 10 General Biology 11 5:2 (4) 

• BlO-300 Cell Biology with Laboratory (4) 

• B10-356Genetics with Laboratory (5) 

• CHEM- 1 1 General Chemistry 1 5 ; 1 (4) 

• CHEM-210 General Chemistrv II 5:2 (4) 



Chemistry 93 



• One additional upper-level Biology course approved by the 
department chair 

M.A. in Biology 

This is a nonthesis degree for students seeking various life 
science professions, as additional training for students seeking 
admission to professional schools, or as an intermediate degree 
for those intending to pursue ftjrther graduate study. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate smdy, applicants must take the Graduate Re- 
cord Examination, including the General Test and the 
Advanced Test in Biology. International applicants whose first 
language is not English are required to submit results of the Test 
of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants must 
submit two letters of recommendation. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Comprehensive examination 

• Directed literature research (BIO-790) resulting in a 
significant paper reviewing some aspect of life science; the 
subject of this review paper is selected by the student subject 
to approval by the graduate studies committee and the chair of 
the department 

• An oral report presented in the form of a public seminar on the 
topic of the review paper 

Course Requirements 

• BlO-566 Evolutionary Mechanisms (3) 

• BIO-583 Molecular Biology (3) 

• BIO-677 Special Topics in Developmental Biology (1) 
or 

BlO-679 Topics in Evolutionary Biology ( I ) 

• BIO-697 Research Methods in Biology (3) 

• BIO-790 Biology Literature Research (3) 

• STAT-514 Statistical Methods (3) (satisfies tool of research 
requirement) 

• An additional 14 hours of approved graduate course work 



M.S. in Biology 



This is a research degree that may serve as an intermediate 
degree for those intending to pursue further graduate study, as 
well as a necessary degree for a variety of careers in the life sci- 
ences. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must take the Graduate Re- 
cord Examination, including the General Test and the 
Advanced Test in Biology. Intemational applicants whose first 
language is not English are required to submit results of the Test 
of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants must 
submit two letters of recommendation. Preference is given to 
applicants with a clear interest in working in the research labo- 
ratory of one of the full-time faculty members in the depart- 
ment. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Comprehensive examination 

• Advancement to candidacy, which requires the acceptance of 
a research proposal by the student's advisor, the graduate 
studies committee, and the chair of the department at least one 
semester prior to the oral defense of the thesis. 

• Completion, oral defense, and the acceptance of thesis by the 
thesis committee, chair of the department, and the university 

Course Requirements 

• BIO-566 Evolutionary Mechanisms (3) 

• BIO-583 Molecular Biology (3) 

• BIO-677 Special Topics in Developmental Biology ( 1 ) 
or 

BIO-679 Topics in Evolutionary Biology ( I ) 

• BIO-697 Research Methods in Biology (3) 

• BIO-797 Master's Thesis Research (5) 

• STAT-5 14 Statistical Methods (3) (satisfies tool of research 
requirement) 

• An additional 12 hours of approved graduate course work 



Chemistry 



Acting Chair William Hirzy 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus H.S. El Khadem (Isbell Chair Emerims), 

D. Horton (Isbell Chair Emeritus), P.F. Waters 

Professor J.E. Girard, R. Wander 

Research Professor L.T. Hughes 

Associate Professor Emeritus F.W. Carson 

Associate Professor M. Konaklieva 

Assistant Professor S. Dehghan, D. Fox, K. Muratore 

Chemistry is the science that deals with the composition of 
materials, their structures and properties, the transformations 



they undergo, and the energy changes that accompany these 
transformations. Areas of smdy include general, organic, physi- 
cal, analytical, and inorganic chemistry, as well as biochemistry 
and earth science. Smdents are encouraged to participate in re- 
search projects at all levels. 

Accredited by the American Chemical Society, the depart- 
ment offers programs leading to the B.S. and M.S. in Chemistry 
and the B.S. in Biochemistry. Besides training for a career or 
graduate study m chemistr\', undergraduate students are pre- 
pared for medical or dental school, engineering programs, and 
other careers where technical expertise is needed. The depart- 
ment provides a personal, congenial environment where stu- 



94 College of Arts and Sciences 



dents can develop and pursue a flexible program of study 
designed to fulfill individual interests and needs. 

The Department of Chemistry is equipped with standard 
chemical instrumentation, including spectrometers and chro- 
matographic equipment. Laboratory facilities in the Beeghly 
Building include modem teaching and research laboratories as 
well as specialized laboratories established for research in bio- 
chemistry, polymer chemistry, and carbohydrate chemistry, 
and for work requiring an inert atmosphere. Graduate and un- 
dergraduate students are involved in a variety of research pro- 
jects using the facilities of the department or through 
cooperative agreements with many governmental laboratories. 

Faculty members are involved in conducting research in 
analytical chemistry, biochemistry, carbohydrate chemistry, 
inorganic chemistry, biotechnology, organic synthesis, and 
physical biochemistry. Laboratory research projects are avail- 
able in our own well-equipped modem building and also at 
many world-renowned research laboratories in the Washing- 
ton, D.C. area. 

Research opportunities in the Washington area through in- 
ternships, cooperative education work-study programs, and 
special arrangements are available at the following laborato- 
ries: Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology, Food 
and Drug Administration, National Institute of Standards and 
Technology, National Institutes of Health, Naval Medical Re- 
search Institute, Naval Research Laboratory. Naval Surface 
Weapons Laboratory, U.S. Army Mobility Equipment Re- 
search and Development Command at Fort Belvoir, and the 
Walter Reed Amiy Institute of Research. Students who partici- 
pate in these programs obtain experience with specialized 
equipment and interact with research scientists outside the uni- 
versity. 

The premedical programs of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, including a Postbaccalaureate Premedical Certificate, 
are available to help all undergraduate, postbaccalaureate, and 
graduate students who are considering a career in medicine or 
one of the allied health professions. For more information see 
Preprofessional Programs. 
Special Opportunities 

. Anthony M . Schwartz Undergraduate Research Fellowship 
. Qualified junior and senior chemistry majors may conduct 

research under CHEM-390/490 Independent Study Project. 
• A cooperative work-study program involving several 

research organizations is available through the Department 

of Chemistry. Undergraduate students work full time for six 

months and study at the university for five months. 
Teaching Certification 

Students interested in obtaining teaching credentials for 
grades 7-12 may take a 36-credit hour second major in sec- 
ondary education or combine their undergraduate degree with 
the M.A.T. degree with a concentration in secondary educa- 
tion. For information on admission and program requirements, 
see the School of Education, Teaching and Health secondary 
education programs. 



B.S. in Biochemistry 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a grade point average 
of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale). The department counsels freshmen and 
transfer students, as well as declared biochemistry majors. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each of 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 72 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• BIO-1 10 General Biology I 5:1 (4) 

• BIO-210 General Biology n 5:2 (4) 

• BIO-300 Cell Biology with Laboratory (4) 

• BIO-356 Genetics with Laboratory (5) 

• BIO-440 Microbiology with Laboratory (4) 

• BIO-583 Molecular Biology (3) 

• CHEM-1 10 General Chemistry I 5:1 (4) 

• CHEM-210 General Chemistry II 5:2 (4) 

• CHEM-3 10 Organic Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-3 1 2 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory ( 1 ) 

• CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry II (3) 

• CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory ( I ) 

• CHEM-410 Biophysical Chemistry (3) 

• CHEM-411 BiophysicalChemistry Laboratory (I ) 

• CHEM-460 Instrumental Analysis (3) 

• CHEM-461 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (2) 

• CHEM-508 Human Biochemistry Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-560 Biochemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-561 Biochemistry n (3) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 

• PHYS-1 10 University Physics I 5:1 (4) 

• PFrVS-210 University Physics II 5:2 (4) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 



Chemistry 95 



courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options ( 100-200-levcl Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/lionors.' . 
Combined B.S. and M.S. in Chemistry 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at 
least 18 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the 
bachelor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential 
enrollment in the two programs. 

TTiis program enables qualified students to earn, in a contin- 
uous plan of study, both the B.S. in Biochemistry or Chemistry 
and the M.S. in Chemistry. 
Requirements 

• Undergraduate chemistry majors should apply for admission 
lo the B.S./M.S. program by the end of the junior year 
Admission is open to undergraduates whose overall grade 
point average and grade point average in chemistry courses is 
3.00 or higher Applications must be accompanied by two 
letters of recommendation and a statement of purpose. 
Students should discuss their interest in the program with 
members of the faculty before submitting a formal 
application. Interested students are encouraged to enroll in 
CHEM-490 Independent Study Project to conduct 
independent study research before applying. 

• All requirements for the B.S. in Chemistry or Biochemistry 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work in chemistry and 
STAT-5 14 Statistical Methods to satisfy the requirements for 
both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Chemistry, including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

B.S. in Chemistry 

Admission to the Program 

Fomial admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale). The department counsels fresh- 
men and transfer students, as well as declared chemistry majors. 



University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second- level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 68 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• CHEM-llOGeneralChemistry 15:1 (4) 

• CHEM-210 General Chemistry II 5:2 (4) 

• CHEM-3 1 Organic Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-3 1 2 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory ( I ) 

• CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry II (3) 

• CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (I) 

• CHEM-350 Quantitative Analysis (3) 

• CHEM-35 1 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (2) 

• CHEM-410 Biophysical Chemistry (3) 

• CHEM-411 Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory ( 1 ) 

• CHEM-460 Instrumental Analysis (3) 

• CHEM-461 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (2) 

• CHEM-5 10 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3) 

• CHEM-5 1 1 Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2) 

• CHEM-550 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) 

• CHEM-552 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory ( I ) 

• CHEM-560 Biochemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-561 Biochemistry II (3) 

• MATH-22I Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 

• MATH-313 Calculus III (4) 

• PHYS-llO University Physics I 5:1 (4) 

• PHYS-210 University Physics II 5:2 (4) 

• At least 3 credit hours from the following: 
CHEM-490 Independent Study Project (1-6) 
CHEM-498 Honors: Senior Year { 1-3) 
CHEM-499 Honors: Senior Year (1-3) 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courees including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 



96 College of Arts and Sciences 



ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options ( 1 00-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined B.S. and M.S. in Chemistry 

American University offers students the opportunity to 
earn both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its ac- 
celerated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate sUi- 
dents may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required 
for the graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements 
for both degree programs. The department that oversees the 
graduate program the student enters will determine if the 
courses the undergraduate student completes will satisfy mas- 
ter's degree requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must 
complete at least 1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate 
level after the bachelor's degree is earned and maintain contin- 
uous, sequential enrollment in the two programs. 

This program enables qualified students to earn, in a con- 
tinuous plan of study, both the B.S. in Biochemistry or Chem- 
istry and the M.S. in Chemistry. 
Requirements 

• Undergraduate chemistry majors should apply for 
admission to the B.S./M.S. program by the end of the junior 
year. Admission is open to undergraduates whose overall 
grade point average and grade point average in chemistry 
courses is 3.00 or higher Applications must be accompanied 
by two letters of recommendation and a statement of 
purpose. 

Students should discuss their interest in the program with 
members of the faculty before submitting a formal 
application. Interested students are encouraged to enroll in 
CHEM-490 Independent Study Project to conduct 
independent sUidy research before applying. 

• All requirements forthe B.S. in Chemistry or Biochemistry 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work in chemistry and 
STAT-5 1 4 Statistical Methods to satisfy the requirements for 
both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Chemistry, including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Biochemistry 

• 35 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• BIO-1 10 General Biology I 5:1 (4) 



• BIO-210 General Biology II 5:2 (4) 

• BIO-300 Cell Biology with Laboratory (4) 

• CHEM-1 10 General Chemistry I 5: 1 (4) 

• CHEM-210 General Chemistiy II 5:2 (4) 

• CHEM-310Orgamc Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-3 1 2 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory ( 1 ) 

• CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry II (3) 

• CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-508 Human Biochemistry Laboratory ( I ) 

• CHEM-560 Biochemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-561 Biochemistry II (3) 

Minor in Chemistry 

• 24 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• CHEM- 1 1 General Chemistry I 5: 1 (4) 

• CHEM-2 10 General Chemistry II 5:2 (4) 

• CHEM-3I0 Organic Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-3 1 2 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory ( 1 ) 

• CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry II (3) 

• CHEM-322 Organic ChemisUy II Laboratory ( 1 ) 

• 8 credit hours from the following with the approval of the 
department chair: 

CHEM-350 Quantitative Analysis (3) 
CHEM-351 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (2) 
CHEM-4 10 Biophysical Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-41 1 Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory (I) 
CHEM-460 Instrumental Analysis (3) 
CHEM-461 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (2) 
CHEM-510 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-5 1 1 .Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2) 
CHEM-560 Biochemisti7 I (3) 
CHEM-561 Biochemistry II (3) 

M.S. in Chemistry 

Admission to the Program 

Applicants must have earned a degree equivalent to fulfilling 
the requirements for a B.S. in Chemistry or Biochemistry with a 
3.00 cumulative grade point average (on a 4.00 scale) in chemis- 
try from a college accredited by the American Chemical Society 
or equivalent. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are 
required. All applications must be approved by the faculty of the 
Department of Chemistry. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate work 

The entire course of study must constiUite a unified program. 
Each suident must have a proposed cumculum approved by 
the department's academic advisor and the department chair 
within one semester after entering the program. 



Computer Science 97 



• Tool of research: an examination in German, French, 
Russian, or statistics. 

• One comprehensive examination 

• Research requirement: 

CHEM-797 Master's Thesis Research (6) or 
CHEM-797 Master's Thesis Research (3) and 
CHEM-691 Intemship in Chemistry (3) 
with grades of B or better 

A thesis of publishabie quahty based on original chemical 
laboratory research must be presented at a public seminar and 
defended before the student's committee immediately 
thereafter A research proposal must be accepted by the 
student's thesis committee at least one semester prior to the 
oral defense of the thesis. 
Course Requirements 

Skills Courses (9 credit hours) 

• CHEM-602 Research Method Design (3) 

• CHEM-605 Research Seminar (3) 

• STAT-5 14 Statistical Methods (3) or skills course approved 
by advisor 

Computer Science 



Concepts Courses (IS credit hours) 

• 15 credit hours from the following: 
CHEM-510 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-520 Advanced Organic Chemistry 1 (3) 
CHEM-540 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-561 Biochemistry II (3) 
CHEM-635 Topics in Biological and Organic 

Chemistry (3) (may be taken twice with different 

topic) 
CHEM-655 Topics in Inorganic and Analytical 

Chemistry (3) (may be taken twice with different 

topic) 
CHEM-660 Topics in Environmental Chemistry (3) (may 

be taken twice with different topic) 
Research Courses (6 credit hours) 

• CHEM-797 Master's Thesis Research (6) 
or 

CHEM-797 Master's Thesis Research (3) and 
CHEM-691 Intemship in Chemistry (3) 



Chair Angela Wu 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus R.A. Bassler, T.J. Bergin, 

F.W. Connolly. W.J. Kennevan 

Professor M. Owrang, A. Wu 

Associate Professor M.A. Gray 

Assistant Professor M. Black 

Computer Science programs prepare students for a wide 
range of career opportunities in software development, com- 
puter systems design, information technology, computational 
theory, and other technical computing professions. They ensure 
a balanced presentation of the practical and theoretical aspects 
of computer science and provide students with a background 
for professional employment or fiirther graduate study in the 
discipline. 

B.S. in Computer Science 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departinental ap- 
proval. 

University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 



General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 55 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Core Courses (32 credit hours) 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• CSC-28I Introduction to Computer Science II (3) 

• CSC-330 Organization of Computer Systems (4) 

• CSC^93 Computer Science Capstone Project (6) 

• CSC-520 Algorithms and Data Structures (3) 

• CSC-521 Design and Organization of Programming 

Languages (3) 

• CSC-565 Operating Systems (3) 

• CSC-570 Database Management Systems (3) 

• 3 credit hours of CSC-xxx courses above the 300- level 
approved by the student's advisor 

Related Courses (11 credit hours) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 
or 

MATH-221 Applied Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 



98 College of Arts and Sciences 



CSC-350 Introduction to Discrete Structures (3) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

Concentration (12 credit hours) 

• 12 credit hours in a concentration, selected from the 
following or with approval of their academic advisor and the 
department students may design an individual sequence of 
courses. Examples of individually-designed concentrations 
include game programming, computer forensics, 
international services, neural sciences, physics, 
mathematics, economics, government computing, 
environmental studies, computer graphics design, 
bioinformatics, multimedia computing, or technical writing. 

Computer Science 

• 12 additional credit hours in CSC-xxx courses at the 
300-level or above, or MATH-508, with approval of the 
academic advisor. No more than 3 credit hours of 
cooperative education, internship, independent study, or 
independent reading may be used to fiilfill this requirement. 

Consulting 

• MGMT-353 Principles of Organizational Theory, Behavior 

and Management (3) 

• MGMT-423 Managing Change and Innovation (3) 

• MGMT-465 Negotiation (3) 

• MGMT-484 Consulting and Project Management (3) 
Digital Electronics 

• PHYS-305 Acoustics (3) 

• PHYS-312 Electronics 1 (3) and 
PHYS-322 Electronics I Lab 1 (2) 

• PHYS-3 13 Electronics II (3) and 
PHYS-323 Electronics II Lab (2) 

Entrepreneiirship 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• FrN-365 Business Finance (3) 

• MGMT-386 Entreprcneurship (3) 

• MKTG-300 Principles of Marketing (3) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 1 2 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/lionors/ . 



Combined B.S. and M.S. in Computer Science 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 
1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. 

This program enables qualified students to earn, in a continu- 
ous plan of study, both the B.S. and M.S. in Computer Science. 

Requirements 

• Admission is open to undergraduate computer science majors 
with a minimum grade point average of 3.20. Applicants must 
have completed the following by the end of the junior year: 
CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I 

CSC-28 1 Introduction to Computer Science II 
CSC-520 Algorithms and Data Structures 

• All requirements for the B.S. in Computer Science 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work to satisfy the 
requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Computer Science, including 
a minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Computer Science 

• 1 9 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• CSC-28 1 hitroduction to Computer Science II (3) 

• 12 credit hours in CSC-xxx courses at the 300-level or above 
as approved by the student's advisor 

M.S. in Computer Science 

.Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, applicants must have adequate undergraduate 
preparation or experience in computer science. SUidents entering 
the program without the appropriate background will be ex- 
pected to take certain undergraduate courses as a prerequisite. 
Applicants must submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam- 
ination (GRE) aptitude test. 



Computer Science 99 



Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate work 

CSC-520, CSC-521, CSC-540, and all course work for 
comprehensive, and thesis or nonthesis requirements must be 
passed with grades of B or better 

• Comprehensive examination: satisfied by completion of 
CSC-694 Capstone Project or CSC-797 Master's Thesis 
Seminar in Computer Science with grades of B or better 

• 6 credit hours of thesis or nonthesis option 

Thesis option: CSC-797 Master's Thesis Seminar in 

Computer Science with grades of B or better and an oral 

defense of the thesis 

Nonthesis option: 6 credit hours with grades of B or better 

from the following: 

CSC-694 Capstone Project and 3 credit hours from the 

following: 
CSC-636 Advanced Database Management 
CSC-637 Database Administration 
CSC-689 Topics in Computer Science 
CSC-690 Independent Study in Computer Science 
Course Requirements 

• CSC-520 Algorithms and Data Structures (3) (or 
equivalent) 

• CSC-521 Design and Organization of Programming 

Languages (3) (or equivalent) 

• CSC-540 Computer System Organization and 

Programming (3) (or equivalent) 

• CSC-565 Operating Systems (3) 

• CSC-570 Database Management Systems (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following; 
CC-5 10 Legal Issues in Computing (3) 
CSC-535 User Interface Analysis and Design (3) 
CSC-543 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (3) 
CSC-544 Advanced Object-Oriented Programming (3) 
CSC-546 Introduction to Computer Networks (3) 
CSC-568 Artificial Intelligence (3) 

CSC-589 Topics in Computer Science (3) 
CSC-596 Selected Topics (with departmental approval) 
CSC-610 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) 
CSC-636 Advanced Database Management (3) (if not used 

to fulfill nonthesis option requirement) 
CSC-637 Database Administration (3) (if not used to ftilfill 

nonthesis option requirement) 
CSC-689 Topics in Computer Science (3) 
CSC-691 Internship (1-6) 

CSC-692 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3-6) 
CSC-696 Selected Topics(with departmental approval) 
Thesis or Nontliesis Option 

• CSC-797 Master's Thesis Seminar in Computer 
Science (6) 

or 

CSC-694 Capstone Project 93) and 



3 credit hours from the following: 

CSC-636 Advanced Database Management (3) 

CSC-637 Database Administration (3) 

CSC-689 Topics in Computer Science (3) 

CSC-690 Independent Study in Computer Science (1-6) 

Graduate Certificate in Computer 
Science 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree from an accred- 
ited instiftition and a course in calculus. 
Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work w ith at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of B or better 
Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the ftilfiUment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Suidents in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• CSC-520 Algorithms and Data Structures (3) (or 
equivalent) 

• CSC-521 Design and Organization of Programming 

Languages (3) 

• CSC-540 Computer System Organization and 

Programming (3) 

• CSC-600 Simulation (3) 

• 3 credits from the following: 
CSC-689 Topics in Computer Science (3) 
CSC-696 Selected Topics: Nonrecurring (3) 



M.S. in Applied Science 



Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must have taken under- 
graduate science courses appropriate to the concentration, or 
have significant practical background in a relevant science area. 
A cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3.00 (on a 
4.00 scale) is required. Specific courses needed to prepare for 
entering the program will be identified through interviews with 
the applicant. 
Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Tool of research: analytical courses (see Course 
Requirements, below) 

• One written comprehensive examination 



100 College of Arts and Sciences 



• Non thesis course work: 6 credit hours in 600-leveI courses 
as approved by a faculty advisor, with grades of B or better 

• Students participate in noncredit workshops and seminars on 
professional skills and current issues in science and 
technology. Students are required to demonstrate 
proficiency in these areas as part of the capstone project and 
internship. 

Course Requirements 
Core (18 credit hours) 

• 9 credit hours in analytical courses from the following: 
CSC-610 Introduction to Geographic Information 

Systems (3) 
CSC-689 Topics in Computer Science: 

Simulation and Modehng (3 ) 

Infomiatics and Analytics (3) 
STAT-5 14 Statistical Methods (3) 
STAT-525 Statistical Software (3) 
Internship and Capstone Project 

• One of the following: 
BlO-691 Internship (6) 
CHEM-691 Internship (6) 
CSC-691 Internship (6) 
ENVS-691 Internship (6) 

• One of the follow ing: 

BIO-697 Research Methods in Biology (3) 
CSC-694 Capstone Project (3) 
EN\'S-68 1 Environmental Research Seminar 
and Practicum(3) 

Concentration (18 credit hours) 

Applied Computing 

• CSC-520 Algorithms and Data Structures (3) 



• CSC-546 Introduction to Computer Networks (3) 

• CSC-570 Database Management Systems (3) 

• 9 credit hours as approved by of the faculty advisor, including 
from the following: 

CSC-543 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (3) 
CSC-544 Advanced Object-Oriented Programming (3) 
CSC-568 Artificial Intelligence (3) 
CSC-589 Topics in Computer Science (3) 
CSC-689 Topics in Computer Science (3) 
Biotechnology 

• BIO-583 Molecular Biology (3) 

• BlO-589 Topics in Biology: 
Bioinformatics and Genomics (3) 

• CHEM-560 Biochemistry 1 (3) 

• 9 credit hours as approved by of the faculty advisor, including 
from the following: 

BIO-589 Topics in Biology 

BIO-677 Special Topics in Developmental Biology (1) 
BIO-679 Topics in Evolutionary Biology (1) 
CHEM-589 Topics in Biochemistry (3) 
Environmental Science and Assessment 

• ENVS-580 Environmental Science I: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 

• ENVS-581 Environmental Science 11: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 

• ENVS-575 Environmental Risk Assessment (3) 

• 9 credit hours as approved by the faculty advisor, from areas 
such as conservation biology, ecology, or toxicology 



Economics 



Chair Robert A. Blecker 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a B. Bergmann (Distinguished 

Professor Emerita), W.D. Bowles, T.F. Demburg. R. Hahnel, 

PC. Thanh. H.M. Wachtel, J.H. Weaver 

Professor R.A. Blecker, I.E. Broder. R. Feinberg, A. Golan, 

T. Husted, R. 1. Lerman, M. Meurs, R. Miiller, L. Sawers, 

J. Willoughby. J. D. Wlsman 

Associate Professor C. Callahan, M. Floro, M. Hansen, 

M. Hazilla. A. Isaac, E. E. Meade, W. Park, K. Reynolds, 

M. Starr, P Winters 

Assistant Professor J. Bono, M. Heracleous, D. Lin 

Instructor J. Dittmar 

Economist in Residence C. Grown 



The Department of Economics at American University 
emphasizes economic studies that enable graduates to partici- 
pate actively in the process of fmding answers to the important 



economic questions that face our society and other nations of the 
world. Emphasis is placed on viewing economic problems in 
both their domestic and international contexts. 

The university's location in Washington, D.C. enables it to 
assist students and graduates in obtaining employment and in- 
ternships in several of the world's most important economic in- 
stitutions, including the World Bank, the International Monetary 
Fund, research institutes, and the treasury, labor, and commerce 
departments. Many of our graduates find policy-making posi- 
tions in die public and private sectors of both the United States 
and other nations. 

The Department of Economics adopts a pluralistic approach 
to economics education that includes neoclassical, Keynesian, 
and institutional economics as well as political economy. Inter- 
national economic issues receive special emphasis, as do such 
socially-important topics as the economics of gender The neo- 
classical and Keynesian traditions form the core of economic 
theorv' that our majors are expected to master The smdy of eco- 
nomic histor>', the history of economic thought, and alternative 



Economics 1 1 



economic methodologies alert students to divergent perspec- 
tives and to the role of institutions. Courses in specialized fields 
deal with monetary economics, public finance, economic de- 
velopment, the structure of U.S. industry, international trade 
and finance, and the economics of earnings and employment. 
The B.S. in Economics provides rigorous training in eco- 
nomic theory, econometrics, and quantitative skills and pre- 
pares students for research positions or graduate work. Within 
the B.A. in Economics students choose the general or interna- 
tional track. The major is designed to allow students the flexi- 
bility of a double major with other departments in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. School of International Service, Kogod 
School of Business, School of Public Affairs, and School of 
Communication. 

The M.A. in Economics offers a general economics track as 
well as tracks in business economics, development economics, 
financial economic policy, and gender analysis in economics. 
The Ph.D. in Economics offers a choice of theory tracks in 
microeconomics, macroeconomics, and heterodox economics, 
as well as a range of applied fields. 
Study Abroad 

American University's AU Abroad program offers study 
abroad programs in which students take courses, participate in 
intemships, and interact with public officials and political lead- 
ers. Students wishing to use courses fi'om study abroad pro- 
grams to count as their capstone must obtain approval of the 
undergraduate advisor. 
Honor Society 

A chapter of Omicron Delta Epsilon, the economics honor 
society, is active on campus. Membership requires an overall 
grade point average of 3.25 and a grade point average of 3.50 in 
economics courses. Consult the undergraduate advisor for fur- 
ther eligibility requirements. 
Special Opportunities 
• Several smdent prizes are awarded each spring: 

Tlie Ruth Dewey Meade Prize for undergraduate research 

The Simoii Naidel Prize for the best performance on a 

comprehensive examination in economic theory 

The Frank Tamagna Prize for excellence in international 

finance and monetary economics 

The Jose Epstein Prize in Development Finance 

The James Weaver Prize for Excellence in Teaching 

The Nikos G and Anastasia Photias Prize for dissertation 

research 



B.A. in Economics 

Admission to the Program 

Fonnal admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and the approval of the department 
undergraduate advisor. The department counsels freshmen and 
transfer students. 
University Requirements 
• A total of 1 20 credit hours 



• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Tracks 

General or International 

Major Requirements 

• 37 credit hours with grades of C or better 

• For the Intemational track, demonstration of intermediate 
level or higher competence in one modem foreign language 

Course Requirements 
Core (19 credit hours) 

• ECON-100 Macroeconomics 4:1 (3) 

• ECON-200 Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

• ECON-300 Intermediate Microeconomics (3) 
or 

ECON-500 Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-301 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) 
or 

ECON-501 Macroeconomics (3) 

• One of the following: 

ECON-480 Research Seminar in Economics (3) 
ECON-491 Internship (3) 
ECON-492 Internship in Teaching Economics (3) 
Study abroad course with emphasis in economics or 
political economy at the 300-level or higher (3) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

General 

• 1 8 credit hours in economics courses (ECON-xxx) at the 300 
level or above 

Students may take no more than two of the following: 
ECON-370 Intemational Economics 
ECON-371 Intemational Economics: Trade 
ECON-372 Intemational Economics: Finance 
One course at the 300 level may be taken outside of the 
Economics Department with the advisor's approval if the 
course is closely related to economics. 
No more than 6 of these credit hours may be fialfilled by 
Washington Economic Policy Semester courses or 
economics courses from study abroad programs. 
No more than 3 credit hours of independent reading and study 
courses, intemships. and co-ops may be used to satisfy this 
requirement. 



102 College of Arts and Sciences 



International 

• ECON-371 International Economics: Trade (3) 

• ECON-372 International Economics: Finance (3) 

• One of the following: 

ECON-35 1 Comparative Economics Systems (3) 
ECON-358 Economics of the World Regions (3) (topics) 
ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 
ECON-362 Microeconomics of Economic 

Development (3) 
ECON-363 Macroeconomics of Economic Development (3) 
ECON-552 Economics of Transition (3) 

• Oneof the following: 

IBUS-300 Fundamentals of Intemational Business (3) 
SIS-385 Intemational Economic Policy (3) 
SlS-465 Intemational Trade and Investment Relations (3) 
SlS-466 Intemational Monetary and Financial Relations (3) 

• 6 credit hours of additional economics courses (ECON-xxx ) 
at the 300 level or above, excluding ECON-370 
Intemational Economics 

No more than 6 credit hours may be fulfilled by Washington 
Economic Policy Semester courses or economics courses 
from study abroad programs. 

No more than 3 credit hours of independent reading and 
study courses, internships, and co-ops may be used to satisfy 
this requirement. 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 1 2 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 1 2 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options ( 1 00-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises smdents in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.eduyacademic.depts/honors/ . 

Combined B.A. or B.S. and M.A. in Economics 

American University offers students the opportunity to 
earn both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its ac- 
celerated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate stu- 
dents may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required 
for the graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements 
for both degree programs. The department that oversees the 
graduate program the student enters will determine if the 
courses the undergraduate sUident completes will satisfy mas- 
ter's degree requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must 
complete at least 1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate 
level after the bachelor's degree is earned and maintain contin- 
uous, sequential enrollment in the two programs. 



This program enables qualified students to earn, in a continu- 
ous plan of study, both the B.A. or B.S. in Economics and the 
M.A. in Economics. 
Requirements 

• Interested students should apply to the program in their junior 
year. Students in this program will not be required to take the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Students will be 
admitted formally to M.A. status only after they have 
completed all requirements for the B.A. or B.S. in Economics 
with a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 or higher 

• All requirements for the B.A. or B.S. in Economics 
Undergraduate shidents may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work in economics to satisfy 
the requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in Economics, including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

B.S. in Economics 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a grade point average 
of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and the approval of the department un- 
dergraduate advisor The department counsels freshmen and 
transfer students. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each of 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 48 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• ECON-100 Macroeconomics 4:1 (3) 

• ECON-200 Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

• ECON-300 Intermediate Microeconomics (3) 
or 

ECON-500 Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-301 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) 
or 

ECON-501 Macroeconomics (3) 

• ECON-322 Introduction to Econometrics (4) 

• One of the following: 



Economics 1 03 



ECON^SO Research Seminar in Economics (3) 

ECON-491 Internship (3) 

ECON-492 Internship in Teaching Economics (3) 

Study abroad course with emphasis in economics or political 

economy at the 300-level or higher (3) 

• ECON-505 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

• MATH-2 1 1 Applied Calculus I (4) 
or 

MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• One of the following; 

ACCT-240 Principles of Accounting (3) 
CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 
MATH-2 12 Applied Calculus II (3) 
MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 
MATH-3 10 Linear Algebra (3) 

• 1 5 credit hours of additional economics courses (ECON-xxx) 
at the 300 level or above, excluding ECON-370 International 
Economics: 

No more than 6 of these credit hours may be fulfilled by 
Washington Economic Policy Semester courses or 
economics courses from study abroad programs. No more 
than 3 credit hours of independent reading and study courses, 
internships, and co-ops may be used to satisfy this 
requirement. 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors sUidents must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 1 2 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.amencan.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 

Combined B.A. or B.S. and M.A. in Economics 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will detennine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at 
least 1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the 
bachelor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential 
enrollment in the two programs. 



This program enables qualified students to earn, in a contin- 
uous plan of study, both the B.A. or B.S. in Economics and the 
M.A. in Economics. 

Requirements 

• Interested students should apply to the program in their junior 
year Students in this program will not be required to take the 
Graduate Record Examination (ORE). Students will be 
admitted formally to M.A. status only after they have 
completed all requirements for the B.A. or B.S. in Economics 
with a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 or higher 

• All requirements for the B.A. or B.S. in Economics 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work in economics to satisfy 
the requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in Economics, including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrolbnent in the master's program. 

Minor in Economics 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ECON-100 Macroeconomics 4:1 (3) 

• ECON-200 Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

• ECON-300 Intermediate Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-301 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) 

• 6 additional credit hours in economics at the 300 level or 
above (not including independent study, Washington 
Semester courses, intemships, or co-ops). No more than 3 of 
these credit hours may be ftilfilled by economics courses 
from study abroad programs. 

M.A. in Economics 

Admission to the Program 

Applicants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study. Admission is based on the academic record 
and two letters of recommendation. In general, a B+ average in 
undergraduate or previous graduate course work is required. 
The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test is 
required. Admission is not automatic for students who qualify 
and may be limited by programmatic constraints. 

A student whose undergraduate background does not meet 
the standards for admission may be considered for admission 
after completing 1 2 credit hours of approved graduate course 
work in nondegree staUis with a grade point average of at least 
3.50 (on a 4.00 scale). ECON-500 Microeconomics, 
ECON-501 Macroeconomics, and ECON-505 Introduction to 
Mathematical Economics must be taken within these 1 2 hours. 



104 College of Arts and Sciences 



Tracks 

General. Business Economics, Development Economics, 
Financial Economic Policy, orGender Analysis in Economics 
Degree Requirements 

• 30-36 credit hours of approved graduate course work; 
including 6 credit hours of core courses in economic theory, 
6 credit hours to ftilfill the research requirement, and 1 8-24 
credit hours of other required courses or electives 
Prerequisite credit (including ECON-603) does not count 
toward the degree. All courses must be taken for grades (the 
pass/fail option is not permitted). No more than 3 credit 
hours of ECON-69 1 Internship may be taken. 

All courses must be approved by the student's advisor and fit 
into a coherent educational program developed by the 
student in consultation with the advisor. 

• Research requirement: 

Thesis: ECON-797 Master's Thesis Seminar(6) with grades 
of B or better and submission of approved thesis 
Nonthesis: ECON-523 Econometrics 1 and ECON-524 
Econometrics 11 with grades of B or better 

• Comprehensive examination in economic theory taken after 
the student has completed ECON-500 and ECON-501; 
students are allowed two retakes. 

Course Requirements 
Prerequisite Courses 

• ECON-300 Intermediate Microeconomics (3) and 
ECON-301 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) 

or 

ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 

• MATH-211 Applied Calculus (4) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

Waiver of these prerequisites may be granted for qualified per- 
sons with comparable prior education or experience. 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• ECON-500 Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-501 Macroeconomics (3) 

• ECON-523 Econometrics I (3) 

• ECON-524 Econometrics II (3) 

ECON-500 and ECON-501 must be completed within the first 
9 credit hours of the program. 
Tracks (18-24 credit hours) 

• 1 8-24 credit hours of approved graduate course work in one 
of the following tracks: 

General (18 credit hours) 

• ECON-505 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

• 1 5 additional credit hours of approved graduate course work 
in economics; 3 credit hours may be taken outside the 
Economics Department with the advisor's approval. 



Business Economics (24 credit hours) 

• 1 2 credit hours of approved graduate courses in economics 

• FrN-630 Financial Analysis: Concepts and 

Applications (3) 

• lTEC-6 1 8 Applied Production and Operations 

Management (1.5) 

• MKTG-632 Fundamentals of Marketing (3) 

• 4.5 credit hours irom the following: 
ACCT-600 Ethics in Business and Accounting (3) 
IBUS-6 1 International Business Analysis (1.5) 
lBUS-747 Doing Business in Different National and 

Cultural Environments (1.5) 
lBUS-748 Management in Emerging Markets (1.5) 
MGMT-615 Legal, Ethical, and Social Issues in 

Business (1.5) 
MGMT-633 Leading People and Organizations (3) 
MGMT-634 High-Performance Teams (1.5) 
Development Economics (24 credit hours) 

• ECON-662 Development Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-663 Development Macroeconomics (3) 

• 1 8 credit hours irom the following: 

ECON-505 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

ECON-552 Economics of Transition (3) 

ECON-573 Labor Economics (3) 

ECON-574 Gender Perspectives on Economic Analysis; 

Microeconomics (3) 
ECON-575 Gender Perspectives on Economic Analysis: 

Macroeconomics (3) 
ECON-579 Environmental Economics (3) 
ECON-630 Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 
ECON-633 Financial Economics (3) 
ECON-634 Development Finance and Banking (3) 
ECON-635 International Capital Markets (3) 
ECON-639 Policy Issues in Financial Economics (3) 
ECON-658 Economics of the World Regions (3) (topics) 
ECON-665 Project Evaluation in Developing 

Countries (3) 
ECON-670 Survey of International Economics (3)* 
ECON-671 International Economics: Trade (3)* 
ECON-672 International Economics; Finance (3)* 
ECON-69 1 Internship (1-3) 
ECON-788 Seminar in Economic Development (3) 
"Students may not receive credit for ECON-670 if they take 
either ECON-671 or ECON-672. 

The 1 8 credit hours may include up to 1 2 credit hours from the 
following; 

SIS-616 Intemational Economics (3) 
SlS-632 Microfinance: Concepts and Practical Tools (3) 
SIS-635 Advanced Topics in Development Management (3) 
SIS-637 Intemational Development (3) 
SlS-650 Global Economy and Sustainable Development ( 3 ) 
SlS-651 Managing Economic Policy Reform (3) 



Economics 105 



Financial Economic Policy (24 credit hours) 

• ACCT-607 Accounting Concepts and Applications (3) 

• ECON-505 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

• ECON-633 Financial Economics (3) 

• ECON-641 Policy Issues in Financial Economics (3) 

• FrN-614 Financial Management (3) 

• 9 credit hours trom the following: 
ECON-54I Public Economics (3) 

ECON-547 Economics of Antitrust and Regulation (3) 
ECON-634 Development Finance and Banking (3) 
ECON-635 International Capital Markets (3) 
ECON-663 Development Macroeconomics (3) 
ECON-672 International Economics; Finance (3) 
ECON-691 Internship (1-3) 

FIN-672 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management (3) 
FrN-674 Derivatives and Risk Management (3) 
FIN-676 Financial Institutions (1.5) 
IBUS-700 International Finance (3) 
IBUS-701 International Banking (1.5) 
Gender Analysis in Economics (24 credit hours) 

• ECON-574 Gender Perspectives on Economic Analysis: 

Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-575 Gender Perspectives on Economic Analysis: 

Macroeconomics (3) 

• WGST-600 Feminist and Gender Theory (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 
ECON-55 1 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 
ECON-552 Economics of Transition (3) 
ECON-573 Labor Economics (3) 
ECON-579 Environmental Economics (3) 
ECON-620 Economic Thought (3) 

ECON-625 Social Choice and Economic Justice (3) 
ECON-633 Financial Economics (3) 
ECON-634 Development Finance and Banking (3) 
ECON-635 Intemational Capital Markets (3) 
ECON-658 Economics of the World Regions (3) (topics) 
ECON-662 Development Microeconomics (3) 
ECON-663 Development Macroeconomics (3) 
ECON-665 Project Evaluation in Developing Countries (3) 
ECON-670 Survey of Intemational Economics (3) 
ECON-690 Independent Study Project in Economics (1-6) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) or 

SOCY-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
GOVT-686 Feminist Political Theory (3) 
JLS-615 Law and Human Rights (3) 
PHlL-616 Feminist Philosophy (3) 
SIS-533 Population, Migration, and Development (3) 
SOCY-670 Gender, Family, and Work (3) 



Graduate Certificate in Applied 
Microeconomics 

Admission to the Program 

Open to smdents with a bachelor's degree from an accred- 
ited institution. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or better 
Course work includes 9 credit hours of core requirements and 
9 credit hours of electives. Prerequisite credit does not count 
toward the certificate. All courses must be taken for grades 
(the pass/fail option is not permitted). Grades of C- or D in 
certificate program courses are not accepted toward the 
fiilfillment of certificate requirements, although these grades 
will be included in the calculation of the GPA. Students must 
have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate courses in order to be 
awarded a certificate. Students in certificate programs must 
take a minimum of 6 credit hours during each 12-month 
period and complete the certificate in four years. Intemational 
students must enroll in 9 credit hours each semester (except 
for summer). A ma.ximum of 3 credit hours eamed at an 
accredited college or university may be applied toward the 
certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 
Prerequisite Courses 

• ECON-300 Intennediate Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-301 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) 

• MATH-211 Applied Calculus (4) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

Waiver of these prerequisites may be granted for qualified per- 
sons with comparable prior education or experience. 
Core (9 credit hours) 

• ECON-500 Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-505 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

• ECON-522 Econometrics (3) 

Electives (9 credit hours) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 
ECON-541 Public Economics (3) 
ECON-546 Industrial Economics (3) 

ECON-547 Economics of Antitrust and Regulation (3) 

ECON-573 Labor Economics (3) 

ECON-574 Gender Perspectives on Economic Analysis: 

Microeconomics (3) 
ECON-575 Gender Perspectives on Economic Analysis: 

Macroeconomics (3) 
ECON-579 Environmental Economics (3) 
ECON-630 Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 
ECON-633 Financial Economics (3) 
ECON-662 Development Microeconomics (3) 
ECON-665 Project Evaluation in Developing Countries (3) 
ECON-671 Intemational Economics: Trade (3) 



106 College of Arts and Sciences 



ECON-672 International Economics: Finance (3) 

Other approved electives may be substituted with 

departmental approval 

Graduate Certificate in Gender Analysis 
in Economics 

This certificate program is focused on the application of 
gender analysis to difterent fields of economics, including 
microeconomics, macroeconomics, labor economics, public 
finance, de\elopment, and intemarional trade and in\estment, 
among others. It prepares graduate students and professionals 
for careers in higher education, domestic and international re- 
search institutions, and go\emment agencies that require eco- 
noinic analysis from a gendered perspective. 
Admission to Program 

Open to students and professionals who have an M.A. in 
Economics or the equivalent, or have completed the following 
prerequisites: 

ECON-500 Microeconomics 

ECON-501 Macroeconomics 

ECON-523 Applied Econometrics I 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program coiorses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GP.A in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit 
hours each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 
credit hours earned at an accredited college or university 
may be applied tow ard the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• ECON-574 Gender Perspecrives on Economics I (3) 

• ECON-575 Gender Perspectives on Economics II (3) 

• WGST-600 Feminist and Gender Theory (3) 

• 3 credit hours of economics electives trom the following: 
ECON-541 Public Economics (3) 

ECON-551 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 
ECON-552 Economics of Transition (3) 
ECON-573 Labor Economics (3) 
ECON-579 Environmental Economics (3) 
ECON-620 Economic Thought (3) 
ECON-625 Social Choice and Economic Justice (3) 
ECON-630 Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 
ECON-631 Financial Economics (3) 
ECON-634 De\elopment Finance and Banking (3) 
ECON-635 International Capital Markets (3) 
ECON-658 Economics of World Regions (3) (topics) 
ECON-662 Development Microeconomics (3) 



ECON-663 Development Macroeconomics (3) 
ECON-665 Project Evaluation in Developing Countries (3) 
ECON-670 Survey of International Economics (3) 

• 3 credit hours of non-economics electives from the following: 
ANTH-635 Race Gender and Social Justice (3) 
GOVT-683 Women, Politics and Public Policy (3) 
GOVT-686 Feminist Political Theory (3) 

JLS-6 1 5 Law and Human Rights 

PHIL-616 Feminist Philosophy (3) 

SIS-533 Population. Migration, and Development (3) 

SOCY-670 Gender, Family and Work (3) 

• 3 credit hours in a capstone or a research methods course from 
the following: 

• ECON-523 Econometrics I (3) 

• ECON-524 Econometrics II (3) 

• ECON-690 hidependent SUidy (3) 

• SIS-634 Field Survey Research Methods (3) 

Graduate Certificate in International 
Economic Relations 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree from an accredited 
institution. Applicants must submit their official transcripts 
along with a one page statement of purpose. For international 
students whose first language is not English, a score of at least 
550 (213 on the computer version) on the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required. 

Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or abo\e, with grades of C or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied tow ard the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 
Core 

• ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 
(students with sufficient background in economics may 
substitute an additional economics course from the list of 
electives, below) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in International Affairs (3) 

• ECON-61 1 Survey of Intemarional Economics (3) 
or 

SIS-616 International Economics (3) 



Economics 1 07 



Electives 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 
ECON-55 1 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 
ECON-552 Economics of Transition (3) 
ECON-658 Economics of the World Regions (3) (topics) 
ECON-661 Survey of Economic Development (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 
SIS-565 U.S. Economic Relations with Japan 

and China (3) 
SIS-63() Economic Policy of the European Union (3) 
SIS-65 1 Managing Economic Policy Reform (3) 
SIS-665 International Trade and Investment Relations (3) 
SIS-666 Intemational Monetary and Financial 

Relations (3) 

Ph.D. in Economics 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must earn a satisfactory 
score on the Graduate Record Exammation (GRE) general tests 
(verbal, math, analytical). The GRE test in economics is recom- 
mended. Admission is based on academic record, test scores, 
and at least two letters of recommendation. Applicants who are 
not native speakers of English must submit the results of 
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). In general, a 
B+ average for previous undergraduate work or a B+/A- aver- 
age for previous graduate work, whichever is more recent, is the 
minimum required. (Most students admitted have higher grade 
averages.) As a rule, students are admitted for the fall semester 
only; application must be made by the previous February I in 
order to be considered for financial support. 

Tracks 

Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, or Heterodox Economics 
Degree Requirements 

• 72 credit hours of approved graduate work: 

48 credit hours must be taken in designated courses; no more 
than 40 percent of course work and no more than 6 hours of 
independent study or reading courses (exclusive of 
dissertation hours) may be taken with any one professor 
Credit may be given for previous graduate work in 
accordance with university academic regulations. 

• Tools of research 

The following courses must be completed with grades of B- 

or better: 

ECON-61 8 Economic History of Europe and the World 

or 

ECON-619 U.S. Economic History 

ECON-620 Economic Thought 

ECON-705 Mathematical Economic Analysis 

liCON-723 Econometric Methods 

ECON-724 Advanced Econometric Methods 

• Field Requirement 



Students must take a major field and minor field. Completing 
a major field requires a grades of B- or better in two 
designated field courses and the satisfactory completion of a 
comprehensive exam. Completing a minor field requires a B- 
or better in two designated field courses. Courses can not be 
applied to two different fields. 

• Four comprehensive examinations: 

Preliminary theory: ECON-702 and ECON-703 must be 
taken completed before taking the examination 
Advanced theory (one of the following): 
Microeconomics: ECON-70I and ECON-713 must be taken 
completed before taking the examination 
Macroeconomics: ECON-71 1 and ECON-712 must be taken 
completed before taking the examination 
Heterodox: ECON-701 and ECON-71 1 must be taken 
completed before taking the examination 
One field comprehensive 
Defense of dissertation proposal 

• Dissertation and oral comprehensive 

Students must attend the dissertation seminar in their third 
year, or when they are working on their dissertation 
proposals. Between 6 and 24 credit hours of ECON-799 
Doctoral Dissertation Seminar, which must be taken pass/fail, 
are taken while students complete their proposals and prepare 
dissertations. 

The student obtains approval for the dissertation topic from 
an interested faculty member in the field who then becomes 
chair of the dissertation committee. Committees are 
appointed following the successfiil oral defense of the 
dissertation proposal. When the actual dissertation is nearly 
finished, an oral defense of the complete draft dissertation is 
held. Final approval of the dissertation depends on 
satisfactory completion of any changes required by the 
committee members following the oral defense. Dissertations 
are subject to all applicable university regulations. 

Course Requirements 

Theory (15 credit hours) 

The following courses must be completed with grades of B- 

or better: 

• ECON-702 Macroeconomic Analysis I (3) 

• ECON-703 Microeconomic Analysis I (3) 
Microeconomics Track 

• ECON-701 Micro Political Economy I (3) 

• ECON-71 1 Macro Political Economy II (3) 
or 

ECON-712 Macroeconomic Analysis II (3) 

• ECON-713 Microeconomic Analysis II (3 
Macroeconomics Track 

• ECON-701 Micro Political Economy I (3) 
or 

ECON-713 Microeconomic Analysis II (3 



108 College of Arts and Sciences 



• ECON-711 Macro Political Economy II (3) 

• ECON-7I2 Macroeconomic Analysis n (3) 
Heterodox Economics Track 

• ECON-701 Micro Political Economy I (3) 

• ECON-71 1 Macro Political Economy 11 (3) 

• ECON-71 3 Microeconomic Analysis 11 (3) 
or 

ECON-71 2 Macroeconomic Analysis 11 (3) 
Fields (12 credit hours) 

• Two courses in each of two of the following fields completed 
with grades of B- or better; 

Comparative Economic Systems 

• ECON-551 Comparative Economic Systems {3} 

• ECON-552 Economics of Transition (3) 
Development Economics 

• ECON-662 Development Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-663 Development Macroeconomics (3) 
Economic History 

• ECON-618 Economic History of Europe and the World (3) 
or 

ECON-619 U.S. Economic History (3) 

• ECON-778 Seminar in Economic History (3) 

Note: For the Economic History field, students must take two 
courses in addition to the one (either ECON-618 or 
ECON-619) used to fulfill the Tool of Research requirement. 
Gender Economics 

• ECON-574 Gender Perspectives on Economic Analysis: 

Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-575 Gender Perspectives on Economic Analysis: 

Macroeconomics (3) 



Industrial Organization 

• ECON-546 Industrial Economics (3) 

• ECON-547 Economics of Antitrust and Regulation (3) 
International Economics 

• ECON-671 International Economics: Trade (3) 

• ECON-672 International Economics: Finance (3) 
Labor Economics 

• ECON-573 Labor Economics (3) 

• ECON-789 Seminar in Labor Economics (3) 
Monetary- Economics 

• ECON-630 Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 

• ECON-633 Financial Economics (3) 
Public Finance and Fiscal Policy 

• ECON-54 1 Public Economics (3) 

• PUAD-607 Economics and Politics of Public Policy (3) 

Tools of Research (15 credit hours) 
The following courses must be completed with grades of B- 
or better: 

• ECON-618 Economic History of Europe and the World (3) 
or 

ECON-619 U.S. Economic History (3) . 

• ECON-620 Economic Thought (3) 

• ECON-705 Mathematical Economic Analysis (3) 

• ECON-723 Econometric Methods (3) 

• ECON-724 Advanced Econometric Methods (3) 

Research Seminars (6 credit hours) 

• ECON-782 Seminar in Empirical Macroeconomics (3) (for 
students who have taken ECON-71 1 and ECON-71 2) 

or 

ECON-783 Seminar in Empirical Microeconomics (3) (for 
students who have taken ECON-701 and ECON-71 3) 

• One other seminar approved by department 



School of Education, Teaching and Health 



Dean Sarah Irvine Belson 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a C.A. Gross, D.S. Geiser, V.E. Hawke, 

B.A. Hodinko. W. Hubbell. RD. Leedy, N.J. Long, 

D. Sadker, M.J. Safrit, R. Whitfield 

Professor F. Jacobs. R.C. Karch, C.A. Tesconi, Jr. 

Associate Professor Emeritus/a F.E. Huber, 

C.E. Messersmith, B.G Coward. L. Fox. L.G Nyce, 

P. O'Connor Finn. B.J. Reimann 

Associate Professor S. Irvine Belson, A. Snelling, V. Vasquez 

Assistant Professor E. Anderson, A. Lawrence, P. Mehlert 

S. Tate. S. Vassallo 

In Residence M. Clark, J. Percoco, M. Thompson, 

M. SchaefFer 

Director of Teacher Education Karen DiGiovanni 



The School of Education, Teaching and Health (SETH) of- 
fers programs that prepare teachers, educational leaders and 
managers, educational specialists, health promotion specialists, 
and researchers for careers in schools, colleges and universities, 
federal, state and local government agencies, business, and com- 
munity and professional organizations. These programs provide 
students with opportunities to collaborate with professionals in 
public schools, educational organizations, and federal agencies 
through intemships, practica, and research. Training in interna- 
tional education prepares graduates for careers in international 
organizations, nongovernmental organizations, international 
schools, and government agencies. Degree programs can be 
completed on a full or part time basis. 



School of Education, Teaching and Health 1 09 



The SETH faculty and programs demonstrate a commit- 
ment to the advancement of knowledge about the nature, fiinc- 
tion, and practice of education. Faculty conduct a wide range of 
research initiati\cs with emphasis on equity, gender, health pro- 
motion, multiculturalism. nutrition, socioeconomic status, 
learners with special needs, the infiision of technology into edu- 
cation, adult learning, and the relationship of go\ emment and 
public policy to education. Themes common to faculty research 
and programs include fair educational opportunity, meeting the 
needs of special learners, improving public health, health dis- 
parities, research informed policy development, as well as in- 
ternational and domestic fonnal and non-formal education. 
SETH is home to the Urban Collaborative for Research & Edu- 
cational Equity and for campus-wide collaboration on societal 
health research. Students benefit from working with a highly 
qualified and dedicated faculty in small classes, and fi^om op- 
portunities to participate in ongoing faculty research aimed at 
influencing educational policy and practice. In our shared view, 
the fields of education, teaching and health encompass the en- 
tire well-being of an individual-intellectually. emotionally, so- 
cially, environmentally, and spiritually. 
Education and Teaching Programs 

On the undergraduate level, the school offers a Bachelor of 
Arts in Elementary Education and a second major in Secondary 
Education, which lead to eligibility for certification to teach. 
Minors in education studies and special education are also of- 
fered. 

A minor in education studies accommodates undergraduate 
students interested in the smdy of education as a liberal or social 
science discipline. It serves students who intend to pursue grad- 
uate study in education or related fields, those who wish to ex- 
plore career opportunities in education and related fields, and 
those whose primary job and career opportunities are enhanced 
through the smdy of education. For students interested in broad- 
ening their knowledge and understanding of education for sui- 
dents with special needs, a minor in special education is also 
offered. Students who plan to pursue graduate education in this 
field are especially well served by this minor. 

The school also offers graduate programs that lead to K-12 
certification. Students interested in teaching in elementary or 
secondary schools or in programs for English for speakers of 
other languages (ESOL) or international training and develop- 
ment enroll in the Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.). A dual 
degree program leading to the M.A.T and the M.A. in Interna- 
tional Peace and Conflict Resolufion from the School of Inter- 
national Service is available. Those interested in working as 
special education teachers or in leaming disabilities classrooms 
at all levels enroll in the M. A. in Special Education: Leaming 
Disabilifies. The Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Cumculum 
and Instruction is designed for students with a background in 
educational theory and practice and oft'ers extended study in the 
field and in areas of elementary education, secondary educa- 
tion, and educational technology. 

The Graduate Certificate in Teaching is designed for stu- 
dents with bachelor's or master's degrees in the arts, sciences, or 



humanities and several years of responsible work experience. 
Students who complete the program and pass the appropriate 
teacher's examination are eligible to apply for certification 
(licensure) in the District of Columbia. Those with such certifi- 
cation are eligible for reciprocal certification in o\ er 40 states. 
Teacher Education Program 

Selective admissions criteria allow the School of Education, 
Teaching and Health to emphasize early and sustained contact 
with children, youth, and adult learners. Students work closely 
with master teachers and clinical supervisors in their field 
placements in and around Washington. D.C. The teacher prepa- 
ration programs benefit from the rich resources of the Washing- 
ton area, including opportunities for intemships in settings such 
as the Challenger Center for Space Science Education, the 
Smithsonian National Museum of NaUiral History, the National 
Aquarium, the Smithsonian National Zoo. and the Washington 
Lab School, an internationally known school for sUidents with 
leaming disabilities. 
Field Placements 

Field experiences, practicum placements, and student teach- 
ing take place in the District of Columbia and the greater Wash- 
ington metropolitan area, including Maryland and Virginia and 
are designed to gi\e students experience in both urban and sub- 
urban schools. The director of teacher education arranges as- 
signments, taking into account soident needs and preferences. 
Accreditation and Certiflcation 

The School of Education, Teaching and Health is accredited 
by the District of Columbia State Board of Education and the 
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE). 

The following certification programs have been approved 
by the District of Columbia State Board of Education: biology 
(7-12 license), chemistry (7-12 license), elementary' educafion 
(1-6 license), English (7-12 license), English as a second lan- 
guage (K-12 license ), foreign language: French. German, Span- 
ish (K-12 license), mathematics (7-12 license), music (K-12 
license), performing arts (7-12 license), physics (K-12 license), 
social shjdies (7-12 license), and studio art (7-12 license). 

Students admitted to graduate teacher education programs 
may be required to complete additional course work in order to 
be eligible for certification upon graduation. Students will be 
infomied of additional requirements upon admission. 
Ongoing Assessment of Academic and Professional 
Performance 

Students are expected to maintain cumulative grade point 
averages specific to each program; receive satisfactory evalua- 
tions in field and methods placements; obtain a satisfactory an- 
nual evaluation from the Teacher Education Committee based 
upon academic, professional, and performance criteria estab- 
lished by the committee; meet specific course grade require- 
ments; complete all Praxis I and subject area appropriate Praxis 
II examinations; and submit an electronic professional portfo- 
lio. 

Students in the B..^. in Elementary Education program must 
maintain an overall cumulative grade point average of 2.70 or 



110 College of Alts and Sciences 



higher. Students in the undergraduate second major in Second- 
ary Education must maintain an overall grade point average of 
2.70 and 3.00 or higher in their primary major. Graduate stu- 
dents must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 
or higher 

Report of American University State Assessments, 

Requirements, and Standards for Teacher 

Certification and Licensure, and Performance of 

Teacher Preparation Programs 

In compliance with Section 207 of the Higher Education 
Act, American University is providing information regarding 
state assessments, other requirements, standards for teacher 
certification and licensure, and performance of teacher prepa- 
ration programs. 

American University's teacher preparation programs are 
approved by the District of Columbia and nationally accred- 
ited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education (NCATE), the organization responsible for profes- 
sional accreditation of teacher education. 

There is a commitment to a strong general education foun- 
dation for students before their acceptance into the School of 
Education, Teaching and Health. Teacher preparation pro- 
grams are organized around four interrelated principles (eq- 
uity, community, diversity, and excellence) and are based on a 
conceptual framework that recognizes the importance of 
knowledge, beliefs, practice, and reflection. 

In academic year 2006-2007, 429 sftidents were enrolled in 
teacher preparation programs; 1 1 3 of these students were 
completing supervised student teaching programs. Fifty-five 
faculty members including 13 fiill time faculty in professional 
education, and 42 part time faculty members (adjunct faculty) 
supervised and/or taught students in the teacher education pro- 
gram. The studentyfaculty ratio for field experiences was 3:1. 
The average hours per week required of students in the pro- 
gram was 35 hours per week over 1 4 weeks, for a total of 490 
hours. 

Aggregate and Summary of Institution-Level 

Pass-Rate Data: Regular Teacher Preparation 

Program for 2005-2006 



Type of Assessment 


Instimtional 
Pass Rate 


Statewide 
Pass Rate 


Aggregate-Basic Skills 


96% 97% 


Summary 


91% 


92% 



Health Promotion Programs 

Health issues have universal interest and appeal, transcend- 
ing the boundaries of race, religion, culture, and national ori- 
gin. Over the past two decades, the importance of maintaining 
or improving one's well-being through health-enhancing be- 
haviors has become self evident. Responding to these develop- 
ments, the School of Education, Teaching, and Health offers 



the following academic programs to students at American Uni- 
versity: 

• Minor in Health Promotion 

• B.S. in Health Promotion 

. M.S. in Health Promotion Management 

Additionally, the healtli promotion undergraduate program 
offers a variety of health and fitness electives to American Uni- 
versity students. These electives provide students with enjoyable 
opportunities to engage in physical activity tlirough courses such 
as aerobic dance, weight training, yoga, golf and many others. 
Exploratory courses within the field of health promotion are also 
open to all American University students, such as care and pre- 
vention of athletic injuries and sports psychology. 

American University's National Center for Health Fimess 
(NCHF) is an integral part of the health promotion degree pro- 
grams. NCHF manages the United States Postal Service's health 
promotion program for their employees and also collaborates 
with American University's Jacobs Fitness Center located on 
campus. Students in the health promotion degree programs are 
offered the opportunity for experiential learning in health pro- 
motion programming and fitness conditioning through 
part-time, full-time, and internship positions at both sites. 

Students enrolled in American University's health promotion 
degree programs benefit from a strong alumni network that pro- 
vides professional connections for informational interviews, in- 
ternships, and occasional employment. Many alumni are 
employed locally, making networking opportunities highly ac- 
cessible to students. Furthermore, the health promotion degree 
programs benefit from the Washington, D.C. location of 
well-known organizations whose purpose is to improve public 
health, such as specific departments of the federal government, 
national non-profits, and global corporations. In particular, oitr 
students have benefited fi-om internships, cooperative-education, 
and presentations Irom organizations such as the National Can- 
cer Institute, National Business Group on Health, Center for Sci- 
ence in the Public Interest, AARP, President's Council on 
Physical Fimess and Sports, and the National Coalition for Pro- 
moting Physical Activity. Finally, there are an abundance of an- 
nual conferences and meetings that take place in Washington, 
D.C. and are available to students at a fi-ee or reduced rate which 
offer students invaluable networking experience and enhanced 
learning. 

For additional information contact 202- 885- 6275 or 
healthfitness(g;american.edu, or go to: 
www.ainerican.edu/healthpromotion 

B.A. in Elementary Education 

Admission to Candidacy in Teacher Education 

Undergraduates seeking teacher certification in elementary 
education should contact an advisor in the School of Education, 
Teaching and Health as early as possible. Admission to the uni- 
versity and declaration of a major does not constimte admission 
to candidacy in teacher education, which is based on academic 
and related perfonnance criteria. 



School of Education, Teaching and Health 1 1 1 



To be admitted to candidacy, students must earn a passing 
score (as set by the District of Columbia teacher licensing 
agency) on the PRAXIS I: Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST); 
earn an average grade of 2.70 or higher in EDU-205 Schools 
and Society and EDU-320 Psychology of Education, pass 
EDU-321 Field Experience: Observation and Analysis, receive 
satisfactory recommendations from faculty, and have an overall 
cumulative grade point average of 2.70 or higher. The Teacher 
Education Committee reviews student applications. Decisions 
regarding admission to candidacy are made by this committee 
based on academic performance and references. 
Liberal Arts and Science Requirements for Teacher 
Certification: Elementary 

To qualify for teacher certification, students must have com- 
pleted ail of the requirements from the specific curricular areas 
listed below. Some requirements may overlap with the univer- 
sity General Education requirements. Consult a School of Edu- 
cation, Teaching and Health advisor for more information. 

• Literature: 3 credit hours in addition to LIT- 102 

• The Arts: 3 credit hours 

• Health: 3 credit hours 

• U.S. history: 3 credit hours 

• Social science: 3 credit hours 

• Biological science: 3 credit hours 

• Physical science: 3 credit hours 

Note: biological or physical science must include a lab. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Note: Students must consult with an advisor from the School of 
Education. Teaching and Health as early as possible to discuss 
the coordination of General Education requirements with certif- 
ication requirements. 
Major Requirements 

• 74 credit hours with grades of C or better, including 1 5 to 17 
credit hours in a concentration 

• An overall cumulative grade point average of2.70 or higher 

• All students must complete the Praxis 11 Exam prior to 
graduation. 

Course Requirements 

• EDU-205 Schools and Society 4:2 (3) 

• EDU-250 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I (3) 

• EDU-25 1 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II (3) 



• EDU-3 19 Children's Literature: Multicultural and 

International Approaches (3) 

• EDU-320 Psychology of Education (3) 

• EDU-32 1 Field Experience: Observation and Analysis ( 1 ) 

• EDU-330 Instmctional Strategies and Teaching Methods (3) 

• EDU-362 Classroom Management (3) 

• EDU-371 Foundationsof Reading Instruction (3) 

• EDU-492 Service Learning in Teacher Education ( 1 ) 

• EDU-5 19 The Uses of Technology in Education (3) 

• EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) 
or 
EDU-545 Overview of all Exceptionalities: The Arts in 

Special Education (3) 

• EDU-552 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary 

Education (3) 

• EDU-553 Teaching Language Arts in Elementary 

Education (3) 

• EDU-554 Teaching Social Studies in Elementary 

Education (3) 

• EDU-555 Teaching Reading in Elementary Education (3) 

• EDU-556 Teaching Science in Elementary Euiucation (3) 

• EDU-499Snident Teaching (12) 

Concentration 

• 1 5-1 7 credit hours in one of the following concentrations in 
Art, Biology, History, Literature, Mathematics, or Music; or 
with approval, students may complete a minor in place of the 
concentration: 

Art (15 credit hours) 

• ARTS- 100 Art: The Studio Experience 1 : 1 (3) 

• One course from the following: 

ARTH-105 Art: The Historical Experience 1:1 (3) 
ARTH-210 Modem Art: Nineteenth and Twentieth 
Centuries 1:2 (3) 

• Three courses from the following: 

ARTS-205 The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 1:2 (3) 
ARTS-2 10 The Artist's Perspective: Painting 1 :2 (3) 
ARTS-215 The Artist's Perspective: Sculpture 1:2 (3) 
ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 
ARTS-340 Sculpmre Studio (3) 
ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 
ARTS-363 Relief Pnnmiaking Studio (3) 
ARTS-364 Intaglio Studio (3) 
Biology (17 credit hours) 

• BIO-1 10 General Biology I 5: 1 (4) 

• BIO-2 10 General Biology II 5:2 (4) 

• Three courses from the following: 

BIO-200 Structure and Function of the Human Body 5:2 (3) 
BlO-220 The Case for Evolution 5:2 (3) 
BlO-250 Oceanography 5:2 (3) 



112 College of Arts and Sciences 



ENVS-250 Living in the Environment 5:2 (3) 
BIO-xxx 300-level or above course, with advisor's 

approval 
History (15 credit liours) 

• HlST-205 Amencan Encounters: 1492-1865 2:2(3) 

• HlST-215 Social Forces that Shaped America 2:2 (3) 

• One course from the following: 

HlST-100 Historians and the Living Past 2:1 (3) 
HlST-1 10 Renaissance and Revolutions: Europe, 

1400-1815(3) 
HIST- 120 Imperialism and Revolution 3:1 (3) 
HlST-2 10 Ethnicity in America 4:2 (3) 
HlST-220 Women in America 4:2 (3) 
HIST-225 Russia and the Origins of Contemporary 

Eurasia 3:2 (3) 
HIST-235 The West in Crisis, 1900-1945 2:2 (3) 
HlST-250 Civilization and Modernization: Asia 3:2 (3) 

• One approved HIST-2xx course (3) 

• One approved HIST-3xx course (3) 

Literature (15 credit hours) 

• LlT-120 Interpreting Literature 1:1 (3) 
or 

LlT-105 TTie Literary Imagination 1:1 (3) 

• Two courses from the following: 

LIT- 125 Great Books that Shaped the Western 

World 2:1 (3) 
LIT-210 Survey of American Literature I (3) 
LlT-21 1 Survey of American Literature 11 (3) 
LlT-220 Survey of British Literature 1 (3) 
LIT-221 Survey of British Literature U (3) 

• One course from the following: 
LlT-225 The African Wnter ^2 (3) 
LlT-235 African-American Literature 2:2 (3) 
LIT-240 Asian American Literature 2:2 (3) 
LIT-245 The Experience of Poetry 1:2(3) 
LlT-265 Literature and Society in Victorian 

England 2:2 (3) 
LlT-270 Transfomiations of Shakespeare 1 :2 (3) 

• One approved LlT-3xx course (3) 

Mathematics (17 credit hours) 

• Two courses at the 200-le\el to include: 
MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus I (4) and 
MATH-212 Applied Calculus II (3) 

or 

MATH-221 Calculus 1 (4) and 

MATH-222 Calculus 11 (4) 

• Three approved courses at the 300-level or above 

Music (16 credit hours) 

• PERF-124 Harmony 1(3) 

• PERF-227 Musicianship I (3) 

• PERF- 1 1 1 Class Piano Level 1(1) 



• PERF-1 14 Class Voice (1) 

• MUS-122 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study (2) (four 
semesters for a total of 8 credit hours) 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the department. 
Each department has tliree levels of University Honors require- 
ments: Level 1 Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); Level 11 
Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and Level III Op- 
tions (Honors Senior Capstone). The departinent Honors coordi- 
nator advises students in the University Honors Program 
regarding departmental options. For more information, go to 
www.american.edu^academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will detemiine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is eamed and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Smdents must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Secondary Education 

.<Vdmission to Candidacy in Teacher Education 

The undergraduate program in Secondary Education is de- 
signed for students who wish to obtain teaching credentials in 
secondary education while completing their majors in the hu- 
manities, arts, natural and social sciences. To do so, students 
complete a second major in Secondary Education designed to 
meet certification requirements in the District of Columbia and 
make them eligible for certification in over 40 states. Students 
should consult with the director of Teacher Education to coordi- 
nate their general and subject-area certification requirements 
with other university and major requirements. 

Undergraduates seeking teacher certification in secondary 
education should contact an advisor in the School of Education, 
Teaching and Health as early as possible. Admission to the uni- 
versity and declaration of a major does not constitute admission 
to candidacy in teacher education, which is based on academic 
and related perfomiance criteria. To be admitted to candidacy, 
students must earn a passing score (as set by the District of Co- 
lumbia teacher licensing agency) on the PRAXIS 1: 
Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST); earn an average grade of 



School of Education, Teaching and Heahh 113 



2.70 or higher in EDU-205 Schools and Society and EDU-320 
Psychology of Education, pass EDU-32 1 Field Experience: 
Observation and Analysis, receive satisfactory recommenda- 
tions from faculty, and have an overall cumulative grade point 
average of 2.70 or higher. Secondary Education majors must 
also have a 3.00 grade point average in their primary major. The 
Teacher Education Committee reviews student applications and 
makes decisions regarding admission to candidacy. 
Liberal Arts and Science Requirements for Teacher 
Certification: Secondary 

To qualify for teacher certification, students must complete sub- 
ject-area certification standards and U.S. History. These require- 
ments may overlap with General Education requirements. 
Major Requirements 

• 37 credit hours with grades of C or better 

• Completion of the major requirements with a cumulative 
grade point average of 3.00 in one of the following: American 
Studies; Art History; Anthropology; Biology; CLEG 
(Communication, Legal Institutions, Economics and 
Government); Chemistry; Economics; Environmental 
Studies; French Studies; Foreign Language and 
Communication Media; Justice; Gemian Studies; Graphic 
Design; Health Promotion, History; International Studies; 
Language and Area Studies; Law and Society; Literature; 
Mathematics; Multimedia; Music; Statistics; Studio Art; 
Perfonning Arts: Theatre; Performing Arts: Music Theatre; 
Physics; Political Science; Spanish Studies; or Sociology. 

• An overall grade point average of 2.70 with 3.00 or higher in 
their primary major. 

• All students must complete the Praxis 11 Exam prior to 
graduation. 

Course Requirements 

• EDU-205 Schools and Society 4:2 (3) 

• EDU-320 Psychology of Education (3) 

• EDU-32 1 Field Experience: Observation and Analysis ( 1 ) 
Note: EDU-205, EDU-320, and EDU-32 1 must be taken prior 
to application for admission to the Teacher Education Program. 

• EDU-362 Classroom Management (3) 

• EDU-492 Service Learning in Teacher Education ( 1 ) 

• EDU^99 Student Teaching (12) 

• EDU-520 Reading, Writing, and Literature across the 

Curriculum (3) 

• EDU-522 Principles of Effective Methods and Instnjction (3) 

• EDU-540 Methods and Materials in Secondary Mucation (3) 
(or other methods courses offlsrcd by arts and sciences 
departments and approved by the SETH advisor) 

• EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) or 
EDU-545 Overview of all Exceptionalities: The Arts in 
Special Education (3) 

• EDU-xxx elective (2-3) as approved by SETH advisor 



University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level 11 Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 

Minor in Education Studies 

• 2 1 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• EDU-205 Schools and Society 4:2 (3) 

• EDU-320 Psychology of Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

EDU-285 Education for Intemational Development 3:2 (3) 
EDU-319 Children's Literature: Multicultural and 

Intemational Approaches (3) 
PSYC-300 Memory and Cognition (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 
ANTH-544 Topics in Public Antliropology: 

Anthropology of Education (3) 
EDU-490 Independent Study Project in Education (1-6) 

(permission of the SETH advisor required) 
EDU-491 Intemship in Education (3-9) (permission of the 

SETH advisor required) 
EDU-519 The Uses of Technology in Educafion (3) 
EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) or 
EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in 

Special Education (3) 
TESL-522 Language Acquisition (3) 
TESL-528 Bilingual Education (3) 

Other courses may be substituted with permission of the 
SETH advisor. 

Minor in Special Education 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• EDU-205 Schools and Society 4:2 (3) 

• EDU-320 Psychology of Education (3) 

• EDU-502 Methods of Managing Pupils with Behavior 

Disorders (3) 



114 Collegeof Arts and Sciences 



• EDU-541 Foundationsof Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) 
or 
EDU-545 Overview of all Exceptionalities: The Arts in 

Special Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours from EDU-490 Independent Study in 
Education ( 1 -6) or EDU-49 1 Internship in Education (3-9) 
Other courses may be substituted with permission of the 
SETH advisor. 

M.A. in International Training and 
Education 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting university requirements for graduate 
study, preference is given to applicants who have a minimum 
of six months intercultural and/or international experience as 
either a student or professional. Applicants must earn a satis- 
factory score on the Graduate Record Examination (ORE). 
Applicants are also required to submit two letters of recom- 
mendation from persons able to evaluate the applicant's poten- 
tial for graduate study in intemational training and education 
and their intercultural experience. Applicants in foreign coun- 
tries who are unable to take the GRE should contact the School 
of Education, Teaching and Health prior to applying for ad- 
mission to make alternative arrangements. All students whose 
first language is not English are required to take the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work including 1 8 
credit hours of core courses, 1 5 credit hours in an area of 
concentration, and 3 credit hours of research methodology 
Students with extensive volunteer experience in 
development and training organizations such as the Peace 
Corps. VISTA, Americorp, etc., can earn up to 6 credit hours 
toward their degree. Students will be charged tuition for 
these credit hours. 

• Comprehensive examination requirement is satisfied by 
successful completion of EDU-685 Proseminar: 
Intemational Training and Education. 

Course Requirements 
Core (15 credit hours) 

• EDU-598 Comparative and totemational Education (3) 

• EDU-6I2 Equity and Educational Opportunity (3) 

• EDU-61 8 Human Growth and Development across the 

Life Span (3) 

• EDU-642 Training Program Design (3) 

• EDU-685 Proseminar: Intemational Training and 

Education (3) 

Social Science Research Methodology Requirement 
(3 credit hours) 

• EDU-6I0 Research in Intemational Education (3) 



Another graduate research methods course may be substituted 
with approval of the SETH dean 
Area of Concentration (18 credit hours) 

• 1 8 credit hours in one of the following areas or in an 
individually-designed program, in consultation with an 
advisor 

International Development Education 

• EDU-648 Education and Development: Sector Analysis (3) 

• EDU-649 Nonformal Education and Development (3) 

• 12 additional approved graduate credit hours 
International Education Exchange 

• EDU-61 4 Intemational Education Exchange: Policies 

and Practices (3) 

• EDU-647 Global and MulticulUiral Education (3) 

• 1 2 additional approved graduate credit hours 
Global Education 

• EDU-61 9 Children's Literature: Multicultural and 

Intemational Approaches (3) 

• EDU-624 Language, Schooling, and Nation-Building (3) 

• 1 2 additional approved graduate credit hours 
Global Health 

• HFIT-575 Global Healdi (3) 

• HFIT-585 Global Health Policy (3) 

• 12 additional approved graduate credit hours 

M.A. in Special Education: Learning 
Disabilities 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, applicants must earn a satisfactory score on 
the Graduate Record General Examination. To be admitted stu- 
dents must earn a passing score on the PRAXIS I: 
Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) as set by the District of Co- 
lumbia. 
Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work 

Option to waive course work: Students with the appropriate 
prior study or professional experience in the field of education 
may be permitted to waive up to 6 credit hours of course work 
widiout replacement. The waiving of credit hours and the 
specific courses to be waived are determined and approved by 
the advisor and the SETH dean upon admission to a master's 
program. In addition, one of the following may be required: an 
assessment provided by an educational institution or 
organization which has criteria and evaluation procedures 
approved by the School of Education, Teaching and Health; or 
a portfolio developed in a one-credit independent study 
offered by SETH and submitted for evaluation and approval to 
the advisor and SETH dean. 

• Comprehensive examination 



School of Education, Teaching and Health 1 1 5 



• All students must complete the Praxis II Exam prior to 
graduation. 

Course Requirements 

• EDU-502 Methods of Managing Pupils with Behavior 

Disorders (3) 

• EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in 

Special Education (3) 
or 
EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) 

• EDU-605 Methods of Psychoeducational Assessment for 

Learning Disabilities and Emotional Disturbance (3) 

• EDU-606 Theories and Methods of Diagnostic and 

Remedial Mathematics (3) 

• EDU-607 Research Seminar in Special Education (3) 

• EDU-620 Theories of Educational Psychology and Human 
Development (3) (or an elective approved by the student's 
advisor) 

• EDU-644 Language Development and Remediation (3) 

• EDU-645 Learning Disabilities I (3) 

• EDU-646 Learning Disabilities II (3) 

• EDU-671 Foundationsof Reading: Diagnosis and 

Remediation (3) 

• EDU-792 In-Service Training Project (6) 

Combined Bachelor's Degree and M.A. in Special 
Education: Learning Disabilities. 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree thai may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. Bachelor 's'master's students must complete at 
least 1 8 in-rcsidence credit hours at the graduate level after the 
bachelor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequen- 
tial enrollment in the two programs. 

This program enables highly qualified students to earn both 
a B.A. or a B.S. in a related discipline and the M.A. in Special 
Education: Learning Disabilities. 

Requirements 

• Students should apply to the master's program in the second 
semester of their junior year. Applicants must have a grade 
point average of 3.00 or higher in major and minor courses 
and must satisfactorily complete the following: 
EDU-502 Methods of Managing Pupils with Behavior 

Disorders (3) 
EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 
Exceptional Children (3) 



EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in 
Special Education (3) 

• All requirements for the B.A. or B.S. in the student's major 
Undergraduate sUidents may apply up to 9 credit hours from 
approved graduate-level courses, including EDU-502 and 
EDU-541 or EDU-545 to satisfy the requirements of both 
degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in Special Education: Leaming 
Disabilities, including a minimum of 18 credit hours 
completed in residence in graduate status after the 
undergraduate degree has been awarded. Students must finish 
the master's degree requirements within three years froin the 
date of first enrollment in the master's program. 

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) 

The Master of Arts in Teaching is designed for the smdent 
with no previous background or preparation in education who 
wishes to acquire teaching certification in early childliood. ele- 
mentary, or secondary education, or English for speakers of 
other languages. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the mmimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must earn a satisfactory 
score on the Graduate Record General Examination. To be ad- 
mitted students must earn a passing score on the PRAXIS I: 
Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) as set by the District of Co- 
lumbia. 

For secondary education certification, students must have a 
bachelor's degree or 33 credit hours in the subject area they are 
seeking licensure, such as art. biology, chemistry, dance, drama, 
English, French, German, health, mathematics, music. Physi- 
cal education, physics, social studies, Spanish, or theatre. 

Students seeking certification in English for speakers of 
other languages must be proficient in English. It is strongly rec- 
ommended that native speakers of English have some back- 
ground in at least one other language. International students are 
expected to demonstrate competence equi\alent to a score of 
600 or better on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) in order to be endorsed for certification. 
Degree Requirements 

• 39 credit hours of approved graduate work, including 33 
hours of course work and 6 hours of student teaching with 
required seminar. 

Students' undergraduate transcripts will be evaluated 
individually; based on this evaluation, students may be 
required to take additional course work to meet certification 
requirements. 

Option to waive course work: Students with the appropriate 
prior study or professional experience in the field of 
education may be permitted to waive up to 6 credit hours of 
course work without replacement. The waiving of credit 
hours and the specific courses to be waived are detemiined 
and approved by the advisor and the SETH dean upon 
admission to a master's program. In addition, one of the 



116 College of Arts and Sciences 



following may be required: an assessment provided by an 
educational institution or organization which has criteria and 
evaluation procedures approved by the School of Education, 
Teaching and Health; or a portfolio developed in a one-credit 
independent study offered by SETH and submitted for 
evaluation and approval to the advisor and SETH dean. 

• Comprehensive examination 

• Students submit an electronic professional portfolio 

• Completion of the Praxis II Exam prior to graduation 
Course Requirements 

All course work must be approved by the director of the 
M.A.T. program. Evaluation of field performance may involve 
videotaping of classroom teaching. 

Core (9 credit hours) 

• EDU-52 1 Foundations of Education (3) 

• EDU-541 Foundationsof Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) 
or 
EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in 

Special Education (3) 

• EDU-620 Theories of Educational Psychology and 

Human Development (3) 
or 
EDU-61 8 Human Growth and Development across the 

Life Span (3) 
Student Teaching (6 credit hours) 

• EDU-699 Student Teaching with required seminar (6) 

Early Childhood Education (24 credit hours) 

• EDU-609 Effective Teaching for Diverse Learners (3) 

• EDU-619 Children's LiteraUire: Multicultural and 

International Approaches (3) 

• EDU-621 Topics in Social Science Research (1) (three 
topics for a total of 3 credits) 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3): 
Literacy. Technology, Media, and the Arts in Early 
Childhood Education 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3): 
Theoretical Models and Methods for Early Childhood 
Education across the Curriculum 

• EDU-625 Advocacy and Leadership in Early Childhood 

Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
EDU-628 Topics in Early Childhood Education (3): 

Play and Learning 
EDU-647 Global and Multiculhiral Education (3) 
SOCY-553 Multiculturalism (3) 

TESL-527 Cultural Issues in the ESL/EFL Classroom (3) 
Elementary Education (24 credit hours) 

• EDU-519 Uses of Technology in Education (3) 

• EDU-601 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School (3) 



• EDU-602 Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary 

School (3) 

• EDU-603 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary 

School (3) 

• EDU-604 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) 

• EDU-608 Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary 

School (3) 

• EDU-609 Effective Teaching for Diverse Learners (3) 

• EDU-619 Children's Literature: Multicultural and 

International Approaches (3) 
Secondary Education (24 credit hours) 

• EDU-520 Reading, Writing, and Literature across the 

Curriculum (3) 

• EDU-522 Principles of Effective Methods and Instnjction (3) 

• EDU-540 Methods and Materials in Secondary Education (3) (or 
other approved methods courses) 

• EDU-662 Classroom Management (3) 

• Four elective courses (12 credit hours), normally with half 
taken in the academic discipline of the designated teaching 
area, and the other courses taken within the School of 
Education, Teaching and Health. 

English for Speakers of Other Languages 
(24 credit hours) 

• TESL-500 Principles of Linguistics (3) 

• TESL-501 English Language Teaching I (3) 

• TESL-502 English Language Teaching II (3) 

• TESL-503 Structure of English (3) 

• TESL-523 Second Language Acquisition (3) 

• TESL-524 Reading and Writing m the ESL/EFL 

Classroom (3) 

• TESL-527 Cultural Issues in the ESL/EFL Classroom (3) 

• TESL-531 Language Assessment (3) 

Ongoing Assessment of Academic and Professional 
Performance 

Students must be admitted to the M.A.T. program before en- 
rolling in methods courses (EDU-601-609, EDU-522/ 
EDU-540, or TESL-50 1/502). To enroll in EDU-699 Student 
Teaching, students must receive a positive evaluation from the 
Teacher Education Committee based on established criteria, a 
grade of B- or better in EDU-52 1 Foundations of Education and 
EDU-620 Theories of Educational Psychology and Human De- 
velopment, and grades of B or better in methods courses. Stu- 
dents must also cam a passing score (as set by the District of 
Columbia teacher licensing agency) on the PRAXIS 1: 
Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST). 
Combined Bachelor's Degree and Master of Arts in 
Teaching (M.A.T.) 

American University offers students the opportunity to cam 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 



School of Education, Teaching and Health 1 1 7 



uate degree that may be apphed to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at 
least 1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the 
bachelor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequen- 
tial enrollment in the two programs. 

This program enables highly qualified students to earn both 
a B.A. or a B.S. in a related discipline and the Master of Arts in 
Teaching (M.A.T.). 
Requirements 

• Students should apply to the master's program in the second 
semester of their junior year Applicants must have a grade 
point average of 3.00 or higher in major and minor courses 
and must satisfactorily complete the following; 
EDU-521 Foundations of Education (3) 

EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) 
or 
EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in 

Special Education (3) 

• All requirements for the B.A. or B.S. in the smdent's major 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours fi'om 
approved graduate-level courses, including EDU-502, and 
EDU-541 or EDU-545 to satisfy the requirements of both 
degrees. 

• .Ml requirements for the M.A.T., including a minimum of 1 8 
credit hours completed in residence in graduate status after 
the undergraduate degree has been awarded. Students must 
fmish the master's degree requirements within three years 
from the date of first enrollment in the master's program. 

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) and M.A. in 
International Peace and Conflict Resolution 

Graduates recei\ e an M.A. in International Peace and Con- 
flict Resolution from the School of International Service and 
the M.A.T. in secondary education fi-om the School of Educa- 
tion, Teaching and Health. 
Admission to the Program 

Applicants must hold an accredited bachelor's degree with a 
cumulative grade point average of at least a B-i- (3.30 or higher 
on a 4.00 scale) and should have had at least 24 credit hours of 
social science course work relevant to international studies. 
Students who do not meet these minimum requirements, if oth- 
erwise admissible, are assigned additional course work speci- 
fied at the lime of admission. 

Students must apply to both the School of International Ser- 
vice (SIS) and the School of Education, Teaching and Health 
(SETH) in the College of Arts and Sciences. Admission to ei- 
ther of the participating teaching units in no way implies admis- 
sion to the other unit. For more information on admissions 
requirements, contact the SIS Graduate Admissions Office at 
202-885-1646 or the SETH Teacher Education Office at 
202-885-3720. 



All applicants are required to submit results of the aptitude 
section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Interna- 
tional applicants whose first language is not English are re- 
quired to submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL). The minimum TOEFL score for fijll con- 
sideration is 600. All applicants must submit two letters of ref- 
erence evaluating undergraduate academic performance and 
suitability for graduate study in international affairs and educa- 
tion. 

For secondary education certification, students must have a 
bachelor's degree or 33 credit hours in the subject area they are 
seeking licensure. It is anticipated that students who complete 
the M.A. in International Peace and Conflict Resolution will 
have sufficient background to meet certification requirements 
in social studies. However, students who meet requirements for 
other subject areas will also be considered. Students will be no- 
tified at the time of admission concerning additional course 
work required for state certification. 

Degree Requirements 

• 57 credit hours of approved graduate course work with a 
cumulative grade point average of 3.00 

Students must complete the 9 credit hours in the education core 
courses, 12 credit hours in secondary education, 6 credit hours 
of student teaching, and at least 12 of the 15 credit hours in 
peace and conflict resolution to receive the M.A.T. 
Students must complete 1 5 credit hours in peace and conflict 
resolution. 3 credit hours in economics. 6 credit hours in 
methodology, 6 credit hours in research and writing, and the 9 
credit hours in the education core to receive the M.A. in 
International Peace and Conflict Resolution. 
In addition to intensive course work and sUident teaching 
placements, students are also required to participate in an 
educational intemship program. These field placements are 
carefully supervised and coordinated to meet state 
certification requirements. 

• Proficiency in a modem foreign language 

• Comprehensive examination in international peace and 
conflict resolution 

• Comprehensive examination for M.A.T. 
Course Requirements 

Education Core (9 credit hours) 

• EDU-521 Foundationsof Education (3) 

• EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) or 
EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in 
Special Education (3) 

• EDU-620 Theories of Educational Psychology and 

Human Development (3) 
Secondary Education Track (12 credit hours) 

• EDU-520 Reading. Writing, and Literature across the 

Curriculum (3) 



1 1 8 College of Arts and Sciences 



• EDU-522 Principles of Effective Methods and 

Instruction (3) 

• EDU-540 Methods and Materials in Secondary 
Education (3) (or other approved methods courses) 

• EDU-662 Classroom Management (3) 

Student Teaching (6 credit iiours) 

• EDU-699 Student Teaching (6) 

Peace and Conflict Resolution (15 credit hours) 

• SIS-605 Theory of Cooperative Global Politics (3) 

• SIS-607 Peace Paradigms (3) 

• SlS-609 Conflict Analysis and Resolution: Theory 

and Practice (3) 

• SlS-610 Theory of Conflict. Violence and War (3) 

• SlS-61 1 International Negotiation (3) 

Economics (3 credit hours) 

• ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 

Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in International Affairs (3) 

• SlS-612 Research Seminar in Peace and Conflict 

Resolution (3) or 
other approved methods course 
Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SlS-691 Internship (3) 

• SIS-795 Master's Research Requirement (3) (substantial 

research paper (SRP) 

Graduate Certificate in Teaching 

This teacher certification program is designed for students 
with bachelor's degrees in the arts, sciences, or humanities and 
several years of responsible work experience. Students com- 
plete the program and must pass certification (licensure) in the 
District of Columbia and through such certification are eligible 
for reciprocal certification in over 40 states. Some states may 
require additional courses or examinations. The certificate 
program may be taken in early childhood education, elemen- 
taiy, secondary, or English for Speakers of Other Language 
(ESOL) teaching. 
Admission to the Program 

.Applications must include transcripts of all college work, 
AARTS transcripts or equivalent, a cumulative grade point av- 
erage of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) in the last 60 credit hours of un- 
dergraduate work and in all graduate work, a statement of 
purpose, and two letters of recommendations. Admission to 
the certificate program constitutes admission to the Teacher 
Education Program. To be admitted students must earn a pass- 
ing score on the PRAXIS 1: Pre-Professional Skills Test 
(PPST) as set by the District of Columbia. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 24-30 credit hours of approved graduate work, including 6 
credit hours of student teaching, with grades of C or better, 
and at least 9-12 credit hours at the 600-level or above 



For secondary certification, specific course work in the subject 
area to be taught may be needed to meet requirements for 
certification 

• Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fialfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 6 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

• Students submit an electronic professional portfolio and 
complete the PRAXIS D exam prior to being awarded the 
certificate. 

Course Requirements 

All course work must be approved by the director of Teacher 
Education. Evaluation of field performance may involve video- 
taping of classroom teaching. 

Core (15 credit hours) 

• EDU-521 Foundationsof Education (3) 

• EDU-541 Foundationsof Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) or 
EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in 
Special Education (3) 

• EDU-620 Theories of Educational Psychology and 

Human Development (3) 
or 
EDU-618 

• EDU-699 Student Teaching (6) 

Early Childhood Education (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-609 Effective Teaching for Diverse Learners (3) 

• EDU-62 1 Topics in Social Science Research ( 1 ) (three 
topics for a total of 3 credits) 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3): 
Literacy, Technology, Media, and the Arts in Early 
Childhood Education 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3): 
Theoretical Models and Methods for Early Childhood 
Education across the Curriculum 

• EDU-625 Advocacy and Leadership in Early Childhood 

Education (3) 

• EDU-628 Topics in Early Childhood Education (3) 

• EDU-625 Advocacy and Leadership in Early Childhood 
Education (3) 

Elementary (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-601 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School (3) 

• EDU-602 Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary 

School (3) 



School of Education, Teaching and Health 1 1 9 



• EDU-603 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary 

School (3) 

• EDU-604 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) 

• EDU-608 Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary 

School (3) 

• EDU-609 Effective Teaching for Diverse Learners (3) 

Secondary Education (12 credit hours) 

• EDU-520 Reading, Writing, and Literature across the 

Curriculum (3) 

• EDU-522 Principles of EflFecti ve Methods and Instruction (3 ) 

• EDU-540 Methods and Materials in Secondary Education (3) 
(or other approved methods courses) 

• EDU-662 Classroom Management (3) 

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 
(15 credit hours) 

• TESL-500 Principles of Linguistics (3) 

• TESL-501 English Language Teaching 1(3) 

• TESL-523 Second Language Acquisition (3) 
or 

TESL-527 Cultural Issues in the ESL/EFL Classroom (3) 

• TESL-524 Reading and Writing in the ESL/EFL 

Classroom (3) 

• TESL-531 Language Assessment (3) 

Ongoing Assessment of Academic and Professional 
Performance 

To remain in the Teacher Education Program, certificate 
students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 
3.00; receive satisfactory evaluations in field and methods 
placements; obtain a satisfactory evaluation from the Teacher 
Education Committee based upon academic, professional, and 
performance criteria established by the committee; and meet 
specific course grade requirements. Students must also earn a 
passing score (as set by the District of Columbia teacher licens- 
ing agency) on the PRAXIS I: Pre-Professional Skills Test 
(PPST). 
Admission to the M.A.T. 

Students in the certiticate program seeking admission to the 
MAT degree program will be considered after satisfactory 
completion of up to 18 credit hours of course work. A maxi- 
mum of 2 1 credit hours earned in nondegree status in a com- 
pleted certificate program may be applied to a graduate degree 
program. 

Master of Education in Curriculum and 
Instruction 

The Ma.ster of Education (M.Ed.) in Curriculum and In- 
struction is designed for students with a background in educa- 
tional theory and practice. The program follows the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) 
guidelines for advanced programs and provides an opportunity 
for students to earn National Board for the Professional 
Teaching Standards (NBPTS) certification. Students select a fo- 



cus within the program including literacy, global literacy, edu- 
cational leadership, and educational technology. The literacy 
focus prepares practicing teachers to become literacy specialists 
by providing a thorough grounding in theory, principles, and 
practices of literacy education as well as a critical understand- 
ing of key contemporary issues in relation to the teaching and 
learning of literacy and language. Global literacy provides 
practicing teachers the opportunity to incorporate global per- 
spectives on literacy teaching and learning into their existing 
curricula and pedagogies. Educational leadership prepares 
teachers to develop effective professional development pro- 
grams, provide mentoring and instruction for new teachers, and 
develop assessment and evaluation programs for schools and 
other educational organizations. The technology focus with 
specializations in mathematics or science is designed for 
teacher leaders with particular interest in integrating technology 
into the curriculum, specifically how math and science instruc- 
tion is presented in schools and other educational organizations. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum imiversity require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must earn a satisfactory 
score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The GRE is 
required for applicants whose highest earned degree is a bacca- 
laureate and for students who have completed a master's degree 
with less than a 3.5 GPA, and may be required for those with 
master's degrees and GPAs above 3.5. 
Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work 

Up to 6 credit hours may be transferred from work completed 
at other institutions and approved by the program director at 
time of admission 

• A program of study approved by the program director and the 
dean of the school must be submitted by the end of the first 
semester of enrollment in the program 

• Comprehensive examination requirement satisfied through 
specified course work: 3 credit hours of EDU-629 or 
EDU-691 

Course Requirements 
Core 

• EDU-525 Principles of Educational Assessment and 

Evaluation (3) 

• EDU-609 Effective Teaching for Diverse Learners (3) 

• EDU-683 Curriculum Design for the Classroom (3) 

• EDU-687 Analysis of Instruction and Supervision (3) 

Comprehensive Examination (3 credit hours) 

• EDU-629 National Board for Professional Teaching 
Standards Preparation ( 1 -3) (for a total of tliree credits) 
or 

EDU-691 Internship (3) in an area of focus 
Social Science Methodology (3 credit hours) 

• EDU-6I0 Research in International Education (3) 

• EDU-62 1 Topics in Social Science Research ( 1 ) 



120 College of Arts and Sciences 



Area of Focus (18 credit hours) 

Literacy 

• EDU-619 Children's Literature: A Critical Literacy 

Approach (3) 

• EDU-622 Language and Literacy Learning (3) 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 

• EDU-644 Language Development and Remediation (3) 
or 

EDU-671 Foundations of Reading: Diagnosis and 
Remediation (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the follow ing: 
ANTH-537 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
ANTH-637 Discourse, Narrative, and Text (3) 
EDU-565 Gender and Cultural Diversit>- in School (3) 
EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 
EDU-644 Language Development and Remediation (3) 
or 

EDU-671 Foundations of Reading: Diagnosis and 

Remediation (3) 
EDU-647 Global and Multicultural Education (3) 
SOCY-553 Multiculturalism (3) 

TESL-527 Cultural Issues in the ESL/EFL Classroom (3) 
Global Literacy 

• EDU-622 Language and Literacy Learning (3) 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 

• EDU-624 Language. Schooling, and Nation-Building (3) 

• EDU-647 Global and Multicultural Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
EDU-627 Literacy Education Skills Instimtes (1) 
EDU-792 In-Sen ice Training Project: Internship in 

Education (3-9) 
SIS-546 Race. Ethnicity and Cultural Identity (3) 
SOCY-553 Multiculturalism (3) 
Educational Leadership 

• EDU-631 Fundamentalsof Management in Educational 

Organizations (3) 

• EDU-632 Case Studies in Educational Management (3) 

• EDU-633 Financing Educational Systems (3) 

• EDU-634 Education and Public Policy (3) 

• EDU-639 Effective Leadership Skills (3) 
EDU-666 Legal Issues in Education (3) 

Educational Technology 

• EDU-519 The Uses of Technology in Education (3) 

• EDU-560 Advanced Technology in Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
COMM-652 Web Studio (3) 
CSC-510 Legal Issues in Computing (3) 
CSC-535 User Interface Analysis and Design (3) 



CSC-589 Topics in Computer Science (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
BlO-550 Developmental Biology (3) and 

BlO-551 Developmental Biology Laboratory (I) 
CSC-589 Topics in Computer Science (3) 
EDU-603 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary 

School (3) 
EDU-604 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) 
EDU-606 Theories and Methods in Diagnostic and 

Prescriptive Mathematics (3) 
ENVS-580 Environmental Science 1: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 
MATH-580 Topics in Mathematics (3) 
MATH-585 Mathematics Education (3) 
Science content area elective 

Graduate Certitifcate in Curriculum and 
Instruction 

The curriculum and instruction certificate program is de- 
signed for students with an interest in expanding their teaching 
or supervision skills, but who are not currently pursuing a mas- 
ter's degree. Students select a focus including literacy, global lit- 
eracy, educational leadership, and educational technology. 

Admission to the Program 

Applications must include transcripts of all undergraduate 
and graduate course work, a cumulative grade point average of 
3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) in the last 60 credit hours of undergraduate 
work and in all graduate work, a statement of purpose, and two 
letters of recommendation. 

Certificate Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours of approved graduate work with grades of B- or 
better, and at least 9 credit hours at the 600-level or above 
Grades below B- in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 6 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit 

Course Requirements 
Literacy (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-619 Children's Literature: A Critical Literacy 

Approach (3) 

• EDU-622 Language and Literacy Leaming (3) 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 

• EDU-644 Language Development and Remediation (3) 



School of Education, Teaching and Health 1 2 1 



EDU-671 Foundations of Reading: Diagnosis and 
Remediation (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ANTH-537 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
ANTH-637 Discourse, Narrative, and Text (3) 
EDU-565 Gender and Cultural Diversity in School (3) 
EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 
EDU-644 Language Development and Remediation (3) 
or 

EDU-671 Foundations of Reading: Diagnosis and 

Remediation (3) 
EDU-647 Global and Multicultural Education (3) 
SOCY-553 Multiculturalism (3) 
TESL-527 Cultural Issues m the ESL/EFL Classroom (3) 

Global Literacy (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-622 Language and Literacy Learning (3) 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 

• EDU-624 Language. Schooling, and Nation-BuUding (3) 

• EDU-647 Global and Multicultural Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
EDU-627 Literacy Education Skills Institutes (1) 
EDU-792 In-Service Training Project: Internship in 

Education (3-9) 
SlS-546 Race, Ethnicity and Cultural Identity (3) 
SOCY-553 Multiculturalism (3) 

Educational Leadership (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-63 1 Fundamentals of Management in Educational 

Organizations (3) 

• EDU-632 Case Studies in Educational Management (3) 

• EDU-633 Financing Educational Systems (3) 

• EDU-634 Education and Public Policy (3) 

• EDU-639 Effective Leadership Skills (3) 
EDU-666 Legal Issues in Education (3) 

Educational Technology (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-5 1 9 The Uses of Technology in Education (3) 

• EDU-560 Advanced Technology in Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
COMM-652 Web Studio (3) 
CSC-510 Legal Issues in Computing (3) 
CSC-535 User Interface Analysis and Design (3) 
CSC-589 Topics in Computer Science (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
BIO-550 Developmental Biology (3) and 

BIO-551 Developmental Biology Laboratory (1) 
CSC-589 Topics in Computer Science (3) 
EDU-603 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary 

School (3) 
EDU-604 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3) 



EDU-606 Theories and Methods in Diagnostic and 

Prescriptive Mathematics (3) 
ENVS-580 Environmental Science I: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 
MATH-580 Topics in Mathematics (3) 
MATH-585 Mathematics Education (3) 
Science content area elective 

B.S. in Health Promotion 

The B.S. in Health Promotion provides rigorous academic 
preparation in the scientific and clinical knowledge of human 
anatomy and physiology, nutrition, exercise physiology, and 
health psychology combined w ith the aspect of health promo- 
tion communication and programming. The program includes 
course work from the Departments of Biology and Psychology 
along with a capstone intemship experience. Experiential learn- 
ing opportunities are available at federal government agencies, 
nonprofit organizations, and corporations that deal with health, 
education, and physical activity. This curriculum prepares stu- 
dents for a health promotion position in a corporate, commu- 
nity, commercial, or school environment, or for graduate work 
in a health-related field. 
Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.70 (on a 4.00 scale) after the freshman year and depart- 
mental approval. In addition to the university requirements for 
transfer admission, applicants should have maintained a mini- 
mum grade point average of 2.70 (on a 4.00 scale). Students 
with a grade point average between 2.50 and 2.70 may be for- 
mally admitted to the major after completion of 1 5 credit hours 
with a minimum grade point average of 3.00. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 58 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• BIO-1 10 General Biology I 5:1 (4) 

• BlO-372 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4) 

• BIO-373 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4) 

• HFIT-205 Current Concepts in Nutrition 5:2 (3) 

• HFIT-240 Introduction to Health Promotion (3) 

• HFIT-245 Gender, Culture, and Health 4:2 (3) 

• HFIT-250 Strategies in Stress Reduction (3) 



122 College of Arts and Sciences 



• HFlT-325 Exercise Physiology (3) 

• HFIT-335 Health Promotion Program Planning (3) 

• HFIT-410 Health Promotion Evaluation (3) 

• HFIT-488 Senior Seminar (3) 

• HFlT-491 Internship in Health Promotion (3) or 

HFIT-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) 

• HFlT-540 Health Communication (3) 

• PSYC-105 Psychology: Understanding 

Human Behavior 4: 1 (3) 

• PSYC-333 Health Psychology (3) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• 6 credit hours in a concentration from the following or with 
approval of academic advisor: 

Allied Health 

Corporate/Management 

Health Promotion 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have the op- 
portunity to graduate with University Honors in the major All 
University Honors students must complete at least 12 credit 
hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors courses 
including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone Project. 
Students may graduate with University Honors in the major if 
they complete at least 1 2 advanced-level Honors courses in- 
cluding the Senior Capstone Project in the department. Each 
department has three levels of University Honors require- 
ments: Level I Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); Level 
II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and Level 111 
Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department Honors 
coordinator advises students in the University Honors Pro- 
gram regarding deparmiental options. For more information, 
go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 

Combined B.S. in Health Promotion and M.S. in 
Health Promotion Management 

American University offers students the opportunity to 
cam both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its ac- 
celerated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate stu- 
dents may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required 
for the graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements 
for both degree programs. The department that oversees the 
graduate program the student enters will determine if the 
courses the undergraduate student completes will satisfy mas- 
ter's degree requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must 
complete at least 1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate 
level after the bachelor's degree is earned and maintain contin- 
uous, sequential enrollment in the two programs. 

This program allows qualified students to earn both a B.S. 
in Health Promotion and an M.S. in Health Promotion Man- 
agement. 
Requirements 

• Undergraduates whose overall grade point average is 3.00 or 
higher will be considered for the combined program. 



Students should discuss their interest in the program with the 
academic advisor for the B.S. in Health Promotion program 
before submitting a formal application. The application for 
admission to the M.S. in Health Promotion Management 
program should be completed before the fall semester of their 
senior year. 

• All requirements for the B.S. in Health Promotion 
Undergraduate smdents may apply up to 12 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work to satisfy the 
requirements for both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Health Promotion 
Management, including a minimum of 18 credit hours 
completed in residence in graduate status after the 
undergraduate degree has been awarded. Students must finish 
the master's degree requirements within three years from the 
date of first enrollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Health Promotion 

• 24 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• HFIT-200 Lifetime Health and Fitness (3) 

• HFIT-205 Current Concepts in Nutrition 5:2 (3) 

• HFlT-240 Introduction to Health Promotion (3) 

• HFIT-325 Exercise Physiology (3) 

• HFIT-335 Health Promotion Program Planning (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following, approved by a department 
advisor: 

HFIT-250 Strategies in Stress Reduction (3) 
HFIT-270 First Aid, CPR and Medical Emergencies (3) 
HFlT-323 Issues in Women's Health (3) 
HFIT-410 Health Promotion Evaluation (3) 
HFIT-540 Health Communication (3) 
HFIT-565 Quantitative Assessment (3) 

M.S. in Health Promotion Management 

The primary objective of the M.S. in Health Promotion Man- 
agement is to provide a competency-based, multidisciplinary ac- 
ademic program for individuals dedicated to assuming 
leadership positions within the health promotion industry. The 
curriculum integrates managerial skills with scientific and clini- 
cal knowledge of exercise physiology, human biochemistry, be- 
havioral psychology, and nutrition. Students also select an area 
of emphasis in either corporate health, exercise physiology, 
health communication, health policy, or global health. 
Admission to the Program 

The program is open to students with varied undergraduate 
backgrounds and has few science-related academic prerequi- 
sites. The academic record and experience of each applicant will 
be thoroughly reviewed by the program director The minimum 
university requirements for admission to graduate smdy are a 
bachelor's degree earned at an accredited college or university 
and a 3.00 cumulative grade point average (on a 4.00 scale) for 



School of Education, Teaching and Health 123 



the last 60 credit hours of undergraduate study. A satisfactory 
score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required 
for admission. Program prerequisites include human anatomy 
and physiology and exercise physiology. However, these 
courses can be taken after admission to the program. Interna- 
tional applicants who are fluent in written and spoken English 
are encouraged to apply. To be considered for admission, inter- 
national applicants must meet university requirements for vvrit- 
ing and speaking English. 
Degree Requirements 

• 40 credit hours of graduate work 

• Tool of research: students must complete the tool of research 
examination or HFlT-565 Quantitative Assessment with a 
grade of B or better 

• Thesis or internship option 

• One written and one oral comprehensive examination 
Course Requirements 

• HFlT-5 1 Applied Human Physiology and Testing I (4) 

• HFlT-540 Health Communication (3) 

• HFlT-550 Programming for Health Promotion (3) 

• HFlT-555 Research Methodology (3) 

• HFlT-560 Health Promotion in Healthcare (3) 

• HFIT-565 Quantitative Assessment (3) 

• HFlT-618 Strategic Planning in Health Promotion (3) 

• HFlT-620 Critical Issues (3) 

• HFIT-645 Nutrition for Health (3) 

• HFlT-682 In-Service Training (3) or 
HFlT-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (3) 

• PSYC-670 Behavioral Medicine (3) 

• 6 credit hours in one of the following areas of emphasis: 

Corporate 

• HFlT-575 Global Health (3) 

• MGMT-633 Leading People and Organizations (3) 

Exercise Physiology 

• CHEM-506 Human Physiological Chemistry (3) 

• HFlT-5 1 5 Applied Human Physiology and Testing 11 (3) 

Health Communication 

• COMM-640 Public Communication Principles (3) 

• COMM-642 Public Communication Management (3) 

Graduate Certificate in Nutrition 
Education 

The nutrition education certificate program is designed for 
students who have earned a bachelor's degree and are interested 
in expanding their work to include nutrition education or for 
professionals who are involved with creating programs and im- 
plementing policy to address the obesity epidemic. This certifi- 
cate is closely aligned to the M.S. in Health Promotion 



Management, which educates students to be leaders in the field 
of health promotion. Select courses in the certificate program 
are offered online throughout the year; however other courses 
will be offered in the classroom. 
Admission to the Program 

Applications must include transcripts of all college work 
demonstrating a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 (on a 
4.00 scale) in the last 60 hours of undergraduate work and in all 
graduate work. In addition, applicants are required to submit a 
statement of purpose and two letters of recommendation. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. Intemational students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• HFlT-550 Programming for Health Promotion (3) 

• HFlT-570 Strategies for Weight Control (3) 

• HFIT-615 Lifecycle Nutrition (3) 

• HFlT-645 Nutrition for Health (3) 

Electives (6 credit hours) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

HFlT-5 1 Applied Physiology and Testing I (4) 
HFlT-540 Health Communication (3) 
HFIT-575 Global Health (3) 
HFlT-580 Health Policy and Behavior Change (3) 
EDU-620 Theories of Educational Psychology and Human 
Development (3) 



124 College of Arts and Sciences 



Environmental Science 



Chair Kiho Kim 

Full- Tune Faculty 

Professor DC. Culver , A. Cheh 

Associate Professor K. Kim 

Assistant Professor S. MacAvoy 

Anew generation of environmental professionals is needed 
to solve the myriad environmental problems faced by society. 
These rigorous, interdisciplinary programs provide students 
with a basic understanding of the scientific and social pro- 
cesses that shape our en\ironmcnt. Students completing the 
programs will ha\'e the fundamental knowledge and the criti- 
cal thinking skills to make independent, rational decisions con- 
cerning current and pressing environinental issues. 

The Department of Environmental Science offers the B.A. 
in Environmental Studies, minor in environmental science, 
M.S. in Environinental Science, and Graduate Certificate in 
Environmental Assessment. 

The B.A. in Environmental Studies consists of a core and a 
set of related courses. The core provides a solid foundation 
based on the natural sciences as well as the social sciences. The 
student then builds upon the core by choosing from an ap- 
proved list of related courses spanning many disciplines, in- 
cluding courses in the College of Arts and Sciences, the School 
of International Serxice. and the School of Public Affairs. A 
careful choice of related courses, made in consultation with a 
faculty advisor, will allow the smdent to tailor a program of 
study suited to his or her specific interests and professional 
goals. 

Each student in the program is also encouraged to gain 
practical field experience through an internship at one or more 
of the many public and private en\ ironmental organizations in 
the Washington. D.C. vicinity, such as the Environmental Pro- 
tection Agency (EPA), Smithsonian Institution, National Oce- 
anic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), American Rivers, 
and Chesapeake Bay Foundation. 

Graduates of the program will be prepared for employment 
in environmental fields dealing with basic and applied scien- 
tific interests, management, and policymaking. A minor in en- 
vironmental science is also available. 

The M.S. in Environmental Science emphasizes the 
mulridisciplinarv' nature of en\ironmental studies u hile retain- 
ing disciplinarv' strength and rigor The diversitv' of course of- 
ferings includes environmental to.vicology. conservation 
biology, environmental economics, and environmental policy, 
with both a domestic and international scope. 



B.A. in Environmental Studies 

Admission to tiie Program 

Admission to the program is through formal declaration of 
the major through the Department of Biology. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equi\alent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each of 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 69 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Core (51 credit liours) 

Social Sciences (15 credit hours) 

• ECON- 1 00 Macroeconomics 4: 1 (3) 

• ECON-200 Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

• GOVT- 110 Politics in the United States 4: 1 (3) 

• SIS-105 World Politics 3:1 (3) 

• One of the following: 
ANTH-334 En\ ironmental Justice (3) 
SOCY-389 Society and the Global Environment (3) 

Environmental Studies (18 credit hours) 

• CHEM-330 Environmental Chemistry (3) 

• ENVS-360 Environment and the Atmosphere (3) 

• ENVS-375 Water Resources (3) 

• EN\'S-492 Senior Capstone in Environmental Studies (3) 

• Two from the following: 

ECON-379 Economics of Environmental Policy (3) 
GOVT-370 Fomiation and Implementation of 

Environmental Policy (3) 
GOVT-423 .Advanced Studies in Public Policy (3): 

Conser\'ation Politics 
SlS-337 International Development (3) 
SlS-338 Environment and Development (3) 
SlS-388 International Environmental Politics (3) 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics (18-20 credit hours) 

• BIO-1 10 General Biology 1 5: 1 (4) 
or 

BIO- 1 00 Great Experiments in Biology 5 : 1 (4) 

• BIO-2 10 General Biology II 5:2 (4) 



Environmental Science 125 



ENVS-250 Living in the Environment 5:2 (3) 

• CHEM-110GeneralChemistryI5:l (4) 
or 

CHEM-100 The Molecular World 5: 1 (4) 

• CHEM-210 General Chemistry n 5:2 (4) 
or 

CHEM-220 Environmental Resources and Energy 5:2 (3) 

• one of the following: 

MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus I (4) or 
MATH-221 Calculus 1(4) 
Related Course Requirements (18 credit hours) 

Skills (3 credit hours) 

• One of the following: 

COMM-200 Writing for Mass Communication (3) 
CSC-310 Introduction to Geographic Information 
Systems (3) 
Environmental Applications (12 credit hours) 

• 12 credit hours from the following: 

ANTH-334 Environmental Justice (3) (if not taken for core 

requirement) 
BIO-250 Oceanography 5:2(3) 
BlO-323 Introduction to Ecology (3) 
BIO-340 Marine Biology (3) 
BIO-342 Manne Mammals (3) 
BlO-440 Microbiology with Laboratory (4) 
BIO-562 Aquatic Field Methods (3) 
BIO-563 Terrestrial Field Methods (3) 
CHEM-3 10 Organic Chemistry 1(3) a?id 

CHEM-3 1 2 Organic Chemistry 1 Laboratory ( 1 ) 
CHEM-3 20 Organic Chemistry II (3) and 

CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory ( 1 ) 
ECON-379 Economics of Environmental Policy (3)(if not 

taken for core requirement) 
ENVS-520 Biogeochemistry (3) 
ENVS-572 Topics in Conservation Biology (3) 
ENVS-580 Environmental Science I: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 
ENVS-581 Environmental Science II: A (Quantitative 

Approach (3) 
ENVS-582 Environmental Law (3) 
GOVT-370 Fomiation and Implementation of 

Environmental Policy (3) (if not taken for core 

requirement) 
GOVT-423 Advanced Studies in Public Policy (3): 

Conservation Politics (if not taken for core 

requirement) 
PHYS-105 College Physics 1 5:1 (4) 
or 

PHYS-1 10 University Physics I 5: 1 (4) 
PFrV'S-205 College Physics 11 5:2 (4) 
or 
PHYS-210 University Physics II 5:2 (4) 



SIS-337 International Development (3) (if not taken for 
core requirement) 

SIS-338 Environment and Development (3) (if not taken for 
core requirement) 

SIS-388 International Environmental Politics (3) (if not 
taken for core requirement) 

SOCY-389 Society and the Global Environment (3) (if not 
taken for core requirement) 

STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 
Other courses may be substituted with approval of the Environ- 
mental Studies coordinator. 
Experiential Learning ( 3 credit hours) 

A maximum of 3 credit hours from: 

ENVS-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) 

ENVS^90 Independent Study Project ( 1-6) 

ENVS-491 Internship (1-6) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Ciptions (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

Amencan University otTers students the opportunity to cam 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the smdent enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master "s students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Smdents must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Environmental Science 

Requirements 

• A minimum of 22 credit hours with grades of C or better with 
at least 12 credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• CHEM-1 10 General Chemistry I 5: 1 (4) 

• CHEM-210 General Chemistry 15:2 (4) 



126 College of Arts and Sciences 



• CHEM-401 Geology (3) 

• ENVS-1 02 Environmental Issues (1) 

• ENVS-360 Environment and the Atmosphere (3) 

• ENVS-375 Water Resources (3) 

• MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus I (4) or 
MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• Students whose major requirements include CHEM-110, 
CHEM-2 1 0, and M ATH-2 1 1 /MATH-22 1 take an additional 
course as approved by the Environmental Studies 
coordinator 

M.S. in Environmental Science 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, students must have completed one 
year of calculus and one year of laboratory science (biology, 
chemistry, geology, or physics). A semester or more of eco- 
nomics is recommended. Admission is based on academic re- 
cord, personal statement, and two letters of recommendation. 
The Graduate Record Examination (ORE) is required. 
Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work, including 6 
credit hours of ENVS-681, ENVS-690, and ENVS-691 in 
lieu of a thesis 

Students are required to take ENVS-681 during the spring 
semester of their final year; they write a paper based on an 
internship, research, or independent snady and present the 
paper during a venue approved by the graduate advisor. 

• One comprehensive examination; a maximum of two 
attempts is permitted. 

Course Requirements 
Core (18 credit liours) 

• CSC-6 1 Introduction to Geographic Information 

Systems (3) 

• ENVS-580 Environmental Science I: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 

• ENVS-581 Environmental Science II: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 

• ENVS-68 1 Environmental Research Seminar and 

Practicum (3) 
and 

ENVS-690 Environmental Science Research (3) 
or 
ENVS-691 Intemship (3) 

• STAT-514 Statistical Methods (3) 

Electives (18 credit liours) 

• 18 credit hours chosen in consultation with the graduate 
advisor from each of the two clusters below. A statistics 
course (STAT-5I5, STAT-516, STAT-520, or STAT-524) 
may be substituted for one of the courses; other courses may 
be substituted with permission of the graduate advisor. 



• 9 credit hours from the following environmental science 
courses: 

BIO-562 Aquatic Field Methods (3) 

BIO-563 Terrestrial Field Methods (3) 

BIO/ENVS-596 Selected Topics: Nonrecurring (approved 

topics) 
ENVS-520 Biogeochemistry (3) 
ENVS-572 Topics in Conservation Biology ( 
ENVS-575 Environmental Risk Assessment (3) 
ENVS-675 Water Resources (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following environmental 
policy/economics courses: 

ECON-579 Environmental Economics (3) 

ENVS-582 Environmental Law (3) 

PUAD-606 Foundations of Policy Analysis (3) 

SIS-620 Studies in Global Environmental 
Politics (3) (topics) 

SlS-649 Environment and Development (3) 

SlS-660 Environment and Politics (3) 

SOCY-689 Environmental Sociology (3) 
Combined Bachelor's Degree and M.S. in 
Environmental Science 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 
1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs 

This program enables qualified students to earn both an un- 
dergraduate degree in any field and an M.S. in Environmental 
Science. 
Requirements 

• Undergraduates should apply for admission to the combined 
program by the end of the junior year. At a minimum, students 
must have an overall grade point average of 3.00 or higher, and 
have taken a year of laboratory science (BIO- 110/210 General 
Biology l/II, CHEM-1 10/210 General Chemistry I/II, 
PHYS-105/205 College Physics I/II or PHYS-1 10/210 
University Physics I/II) and a year of calculus 
(MATH-22 1/222, MATH-21 1/2 12). Applications must be 
accompanied by two letters of recommendation and a 
statement of purpose. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
scores may be required for admission to the combined 
program. Students should discuss their interest in the program 
with the Environmental Studies coordinator before submitting 
an application. 

• All requirements for a B.A. or B.S. in any major) at American 
University 



History 127 



Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work to satisfy the 
requirements of both degrees; ENVS-580 Environmental 
Science I and ENVS-581 Environmental Science II are 
recommended. 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Environmental Science, 
including a minimum of 18 credit hours completed in 
residence in graduate status after the undergraduate degree 
has been awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

Graduate Certificate in Environmental 
Assessment 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree from an accred- 
ited institution. Students must have completed the following 
prerequisite courses: calculus, statistics, and organic chemistry. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or better 



Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• CHEM-671 Principles of Toxicology (3) 

• CSC-6 1 Introduction to Geographic Information 

Systems (3) 

• ITEC-688 Introduction to Decision Analysis (3) 

• ENVS-575 Environmental Risk Assessment (3) 

• ENVS-68 1 Environmental Research Seminar and 

Practicum (3) 



History 



Chair Robert Gritfith 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emerltus/a R.L. Beisncr, R.H. Brown, 

B. Reagon (Distinguished Professor Emerita) 

Professor R.D. Breitman, R. Griffith, A.M. Kraut, 

A.J. Lichtman, P.S. Nadell 

Associate Professor Emeritus/a V. French, J. A. Malloy, 

T. R. Murphy 

Associate Professor E. Findlay, K. Franz, M. Friedman, 

I. Klein, P Kuznick, L. Leff. E. Lohr, A. Shelford 

Assistant Professor M. Aksakal, L. Beers, M. Giandrea, 

D. Ho, K. Haulman, A. Lewis, K. Sims 

Historians in Residence J. Banner, J. Barry, A. Beveridge, 

D. Doyle, V. Hamden, P. Henson, A. Jones, L. Jones, 

A. Nelson, R Reber. M. Urofsky 

History covers the full range of human endeavors: the arts 
and sciences, politics and the spread of political ideas, eco- 
nomic and technological change, and the relationship of indi- 
viduals to their communities and cultures. The Department of 
History at American University encourages interdisciplinary 
study, individually designed programs, and close contact be- 
tween students and faculty. 

The department's outstanding faculty guides students 
through the range of fields and approaches employed by histori- 
ans. The undergraduate program explores United States, Euro- 
pean, and world history and includes seminars, discussion 
groups, internships, and independent studies. A two-semester 
senior seminar provides a capstone experience for all majors 



that culminates in the preparation of a senior thesis. Master's 
and doctoral students may select programs in United States or 
modem European history that stress research, writing, and his- 
torical analysis. The department also offers programs in public 
history, which can be pursued at the master's level or as an out- 
side field in the doctoral program. 

History faculty have close, ongoing relationships with ma- 
jor historical institutions in Washington, D.C., such as the Na- 
tional Archives, Library of Congress, National Museum of 
American History, National Building Museum, and the Holo- 
caust Memorial Museum. These provide excellent opportuni- 
ties for student internships and jobs following graduation. 
During the summer, students may participate in the depart- 
ment's popular Civil War and Nuclear Suidies Institutes. 

In addition to preparing students for graduate or law school, 
the Department of History's emphasis on research, writing, and 
intellectual problem solving prepares its students for work in 
business, government, public interest, journalism, and many 
other professions. 

Special Opportunities 

• Dorothy Gondos Beers Scholarship; James W. Mooney 
Award; Janet Oppenheim History Essay Prize; Richard and 
Carol Breitman Award, Roger Brown Fellowship; Phi Alpha 
Theta Honorary Society 

. Internships at Washington area museums, libraries and 
archives, historic sites, and government agencies 



128 College of Arts and Sciences 



B.A. in History 



Admission to tlie Program 

Formal admission to the major requires departmental 
approval. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total of ten courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence from 
each of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39 credit hours with grades of C or better including at least 
15 credit hours at the 300 level or above. 

The department recommends that before enrolling in a 
course at the 300 level or above, students should complete a 
suitable introductory course or attain equivalent knowledge. 
Advanced Placement 

Prospective history inajors may qualify for 3 advanced 
placement (AP) credits toward the major in both American and 
European history (for a total of 6 credits), provided the appro- 
priate AP examination grade is a 4 or 5. Students cannot re- 
ceive AP credit towards the major if they also take the 
comparable survey courses in either American history 
(HIST-205 and HlST-206) or European history (HIST-1 10). A 
satisfactory International Baccalaureate (IB) examination may 
count toward fulfilling a specific course requirement for the 
major Entering students with acadeinic credit for IB examina- 
tions in history courses should consult with the department. A 
total of 6 AP and IB credits can be counted toward the history 
major 
Course Requirements 

• HlST-480 Major Seminar I (3) 

• HlST-481 Major Seminar II (3) 

• One course in ancient or medieval history 

• One course in Asian, East European, modern Middle 
Eastern, or Russian history 

• One course in African, African-American, Latin American, 
or Native American history 

• One course in Western European or British history at the 300 
level or above 

• One course in U.S. history at the 300 level or above 

• Additional courses to make a total of 39 credit hours in 
history (which may include JWST-205 Ancient and 
Medieval Jewish Civilization). At least 20 of the 39 credit 
hours must be taken at American University; at least 15 of 
the 39 must be at the 300 level or above. 



University Honors Program 

All University Honors sUidents must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the department. 
Each department has three levels of University Honors require- 
ments: Level 1 Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); Level II 
Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and Level 111 Op- 
tions (Honors Senior Capstone). The dcpartinent Honors coordi- 
nator advises students in the University Honors Program 
regarding departmental options. For more infomiation, go to 
www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined B.A. and M.A. in History 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students inay 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that inay be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will detennine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy inaster's degree re- 
quirements. Bachelor's/inaster's students must complete at least 
1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level aff er the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. 

This program enables students to complete both the B.A. and 
M.A. in History. 
Requirements 

• Interested students should apply for admission to the program 
in their junior year Students in this program are not required to 
take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Students will 
be admitted fonnally to M.A. status only if they have 
completed all requirements for the B.A. in History with at least 
an overall 3.20 grade point average and a 3.50 grade point 
average in history courses. 

• All requirements for the B.A. in History 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work in history to satisfy the 
requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in History, including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

Minor in History 

• 21 credit hours with grades of C or better and with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• One course in Westem European or British history at the 300 
level or above 



History 129 



• One course in U.S. history at the 300 level or above 

• One course in an area other than Western European, British, 
or U.S. history 

• Four more courses in history, including at least two at the 300 
level or above. The department requires that all 300-level 
courses be taken at Amencan University. 

At least 12 of the 21 credit hours in history must be taken at 
American University. 

M.A. in History 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must earn a satisfactory 
score on the Graduate Record Examination (verbal, quantita- 
tive, and analytic). Admission is based on academic record, test 
scores, letters of recommendation from two professors with 
whom work was taken recently, and favorable judgment by the 
department graduate committee and chair. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30-33 credit hours of approved graduate work; no more than 
50 percent of course work may be done in 300/600 level 
courses. 

• Tool of research: a relevant foreign language, quantitative 
methods, oral history, digital history, or a methodology 
approved by die graduate committee of the Department of 
History 

• One comprehensive examination 

• Standard (nonthesis) option: Two substantial research papers 
with grades of B or better, one in HlST-75 1/752 Research 
Seminar and one in HIST-500 Studies in History 

Tliesis option: a satisfactory thesis, completed through 6 
credit hours of HIST-797 Master's Thesis Seminar with 
grades of B or better 
Course Requirements 

• HlST-500 Studies in History (3) with a grade of B or better 

• Two colloquia from the following with grades of B or 
better: 

HIST-720 Colloquium in Modem European History 

since 1789 1(3) 
HlST-721 Colloquium in Modem European History 

since 1789 II (3) 
HIST-727 Colloquium in United States History 1: 

to 1865 (3) 
HlST-728 Colloquium in United States History II: 

since 1865(3) 
or approved substitute for one of the above colloquia 

• HIST- 744 The Historian's Craft (3) with a grade of B or 
better, usually taken in the student's first fall semester in the 
program 

• Standard (nonthesis) option: 
One of the following: 

HlST-751 Research Seminar in European History (3) 



HIST-752 Research Seminar in United States History (3) 

or approved substitute 

or 

Thesis option: HIST-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (6) 

• 12-15 credit hours in approved graduate course work 
or 

Public History Concentration 

• HIST-729 Public History Seminar (3) with a grade of 

B or better 

• HIST-730 Public History Practicum (3) with a grade of B 

or better 

• HIST-691 Internship in History (3) 

• 6 credit hours in approved graduate course work 



Ph.D. in History 



Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants normally have completed 
an M.A. in History or a related field, have earned a satisfactory 
score on the Graduate Record Exam (Verbal, Quantitative, and 
Analytic), and have made a substantial beginning in one tool of 
research. Admission is based on academic record, letters of rec- 
ommendation from two professors with whom work was taken 
recently, a sample of recent written work of substantial length 
(M.A. thesis, research paper, or interpretative essay) and favor- 
able judgment by the department's graduate committee and de- 
partment chair. 
Degree Requirements 

• 72 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Two of the following as tools of research: relevant foreign 
languages, quantitative methods, digital history, oral history, 
or a methodology approved by the graduate cominittee of the 
Department of History 

• Comprehensive examinations in four fields: Comprehensive 
examinations are offered in the areas of ancient history. 
United States history, modem European history, British 
history, Latin American history, modem Asian history, 
Russian history. Middle Eastern history, and diplomatic 
history. 

One field must be a historical field outside the student's main 
area of concentration, a comparative or multidisciplinary 
field, or a field in another discipline. 

• Dissertation and oral defense 
Course Requirements 

Specific course requirements depend on whether students 
received their M.A. in History from American University. For 
more information, consult the Department of History. 

• HIST- 744 The Historian's Craft (3) with a grade of B or 
better, taken in the student's first semester of course work 

• HIST-799 Doctoral Dissertation Seminar ( 1 2-24) 



130 College of Arts and Sciences 



Israel Studies 



Israel Studies is an interdisciplinary program that draws on 
faculty and courses related to Israel from across the campus. 
Students are encouraged to study abroad in Israel and to take 
Hebrew language courses. 

Minor in Israel Studies 

Students take three core courses focused on the history and 
civilization of Israel and the relationships between Israel and 
the Arab world. They then take 9 additional credit hours in ap- 
proved elective course work. 

Admission to the Program 

Fomial admission to the minor requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 and approval of the program director. 

Requirements 

• 18 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor and at least 9 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above 



Course Requirements 
Core (9 credit hours) 

• HIST-245 Modem Jewish Civilization (3) 

• HIST-343 History of Israel (3) 

• SIS-365 Arab-Israeli Relations (3) 

Electives (9 credit hours) 

• 9 credit hours from the following with approval of the program 
director: 

HIST-344 Topics in Jewish History (3) (approved topics) 

JWST-320 Topics in Jewish Culture (3) (approved topics) 

JWST-390 Independent Reading (1-6) 

JWST-490 Independent Study ( 1-6) 

JWST-49I Internship (1-6) 

SIS^OO Senior Seminar in International Relations (3): 

Israeli Identity 
Study abroad in Israel is highly recommended and with ap- 
proval of the program director courses taken abroad may fulfill 
minor requirements 



Jewish Studies 



Director Pamela S. Nadcll 

Faculty from other schools and departments of the university 

teach courses in the program. 

The Jewish Saidies Program recognizes that Jews and Ju- 
daism constitute a distinct yet integral component of the heri- 
tage of Western civilization. Jewish studies courses analyze 
the civilization of the Jews and its various culmral and reli- 
gious expressions from the patriarchal period to the present. 

Jewish studies courses embrace the total experience of the 
Jewish people, spanning the spectrum of the arts, humanities, 
and the social sciences. Moreover, since dynamic contact with 
many other religions and cultures influenced the development 
of Jewish civilization, courses view Jews and Judaism within 
the broader context of these dominant societies, and enrich 
one's understanding of American and world Jewries. The ma- 
jors and minors in Jewish studies prepare students for leader- 
ship within and service to the Jewish community, and for a 
greater understanding of our pluralistic society. A minor in Is- 
rael Studies is also offered. 

As a center of Jewish organizational life, Washington. D.C. 
provides opportunities for internships with local Jewish orga- 
nizations devoted to community relations, religious activities, 
Israel, and social welfare. A Jewish studies minor combined 
with an education major may lead to certification for teaching 
in Jewish schools. 
Special Opportunities 
• Dr. Everett and Marian Gordon Scholarship Awards in 

Jewish Studies: Established in 1976 to provide awards for 

outstanding senior theses in Jewish studies, and scholarships 



for classroom performance by students in Jewish studies 
courses, with preference given to sUidents without previous 
background in Jewish studies. 
. Jerrold and Jane Goodman Scholarships: Established in 1979 
through an annual grant from Yablick Charities, Inc. 
Scholarships are awarded annually to outstanding sUidents in 
Jewish studies. 

B.A. in Jewisli Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Fomial admission to the major requires a grade point average 
of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and the approval of the director of the 
program. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each of 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• HEBR-216 Hebrew, Intermediate Modem I (3) 



Jewish Studies 1 3 1 



• HEBR-217 Hebrew, Intermediate Modem II (3) 

or equivalent proficiency in Hebrew as approved by the 
Jewish Studies faculty. 

Note: HEBR-116/HEBR-I17 Hebrew, Elementary Modem 
I/II are prerequisites for the language requirement but do not 
count toward the major. 

• HIST-245 Modem Jewish Civilization (3) 

• JWST-205 Ancient and Medieval Jewish 

Civilization 2:2 (3) 

• JWST-48 1 Senior Thesis in Jewish Studies I (3) 

• JWST-482 Senior Thesis in Jewish Studies II (3) 

• One course in Jewish literamre 

• One course in Jewish thought 

• One course in contemporary Jewish life 

• 1 2 additional credit hours in Jewish Studies 

Eighteen of the total 39 hours must be at the 300 level or above. 
Related courses from other university departments may be used 
with approval of the program director. 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is eamed and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 



Minor in Jewish Studies 



• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor; 9 of the 1 8 credit hours must be at 
the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• HIST-245 Modem Jewish Civilization (3) 

• JWST-205 Ancient and Medieval Jewish 

Civilization 2:2 (3) 

• One course in Jewish literature 

• One course in Jewish thought 

• One course in contemporary Jewish life 

• One additional course in Jewish studies 



Minor in Israel Studies 



The minor in Israel Studies is an interdisciplinary program 
that draws on faculty and courses related to Israel from across 
the campus. Students take three core courses focused on the his- 
tory and civilization of Israel and the relationships between Is- 
rael and the Arab world. They then take 9 additional credit 
hours in approved elective course work. Students in the minor 
are encouraged to study abroad in Israel and to take Hebrew 
language courses. 
Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the minor requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 and approval of the program director. 
Requirements 

• 18 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor and at least 9 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 
Core (9 credit hours) 

• HIST-245 Modem Jewish Civilization (3) 

• HIST-343 History of Israel (3) 

• SIS-365 Arab-Israeli Relations (3) 

Eleetives (9 credit hours) 

• 9 credit hours from the following with appro\al of the 
program director: 

HIST-344 Topics in Jewish History (3) (approved topics) 
JWST-320 Topics in Jewish Culture (3) (approved topics) 
JWST-390 Independent Reading (1-6) 
JWST-490 Independent Study (1-6) 
JWST-491 Internship (I -6) 

SIS-400 Senior Seminar in Intemational Relations (3): 
Israeli Identity 

• Study abroad in Israel is highly recommended and with 
approval of the program director courses taken abroad may 
flilfill minor requirements 



132 College of Arts and Sciences 



Language and Foreign Studies 



Acting Chair Ana Serra 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a E.l. Burkart, GS. Burkart, V. Medish, 

J. Schillinger, B.F. Steinbruckner 

Professor N.S. Baron, J. Child 

Associate Professor Emeritus/a V.Z. Borkovec, 

J. W. Goldin. M.A.G Hood. H. Pineda 

Associate Professor N. Harris, C. Hernandez, A. Israeli, 

A. Oliver, P. Perez, D. Rodamar, O. Rojer, A. Serra, 
J. Wisman 

Assistant Professor E. Dawley, Y. Sheen. R. Von Worde. 

B. Werth. N. Wilhams 

Instructor J. Ata, L. Baeza-Mendoza. G Berg, R. 
Cavaceppi, E. Holtennann, E. Lang, M.Pifiiero, K. Velleman 
Foreign Language Pedagogy Project Leader G Riley 
Director, Language Resource Center J. Nalabandian 

In an increasingly complex world that grows smaller every 
day, the study of languages, literatures, and cultures is of vital 
importance. Learning the ways other nations live and think 
ftjrthers understanding among peoples and cultures. The De- 
partment of Language and Foreign Studies (LPS) offers exten- 
sive undergraduate study in French. German. Russian, and 
Latin American and Spanish foreign language and culnire, as 
well as two jointly-administered programs: one in area studies 
and language with the School of International Service and a 
foreign language and communication media program with the 
School of Communication. In addition, the department has 
joined with the Kogod School of Business to offer a Bachelor 
of Science in Business Administration and Language and Cul- 
ture Studies. Minors are available in Arabic. Chinese. French. 
German, Japanese. Russian, or Spanish smdies. as well as lan- 
guage and area sUidies minors in French/Europe. German/Eu- 
rope. Italian/Europe. Japanese/ Asia. Russian/ Area Studies, or 
Spanish/Latin America. Master's programs include the M.A. 
in Spanish: Latin American Studies and the M.A. in TESOL 
(Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages). (For ad- 
mission and requirement information, see TESOL.) 

In addition to French, German, Russian, and Spanish, lan- 
guage courses in Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, 
Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Swahili, and Turkish are offered. 

Programs in language and foreign studies meet the needs of 
both deparmiental majors and other students in the university. 
Many undergraduates choose to minor in a language area or to 
complete a translation certificate. Internships and cooperative 
education programs are available both locally and internation- 
ally for foreign language programs and TESOL. Smdents can 
complete translation certificates as part of their degree require- 
ments or eam credits towards a TESOL certificate. Students 
also enhance their language skills through study in the AU 
Abroad program. 



Many areas of business, industry, and goveminent service 
consider a language background a career must. Recent graduates 
of the department have been employed in a variety of organiza- 
tions and fields including the Department of State, Library of 
Congress, National Security Agency, Voice of America, and Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences, as well as international import and 
export firms, public and private schools and colleges, and re- 
search and development firms. 
Language Resource Center 

The Language Resource Center (LRC) of the Department of 
Language and Foreign Studies is a comprehensive, multi-media 
facility which supports smdents and faculty in the study and 
teaching of foreign languages and cultures through the use of ad- 
vanced technologies in audio, video, film, computer, and satel- 
lite telecommunications. 

The LRC is located in the Asbury Building lower level and is 
reached via the street-level entrance to the north wing of Asbury. 
For more information call 202-885-2396. 
Undergraduate Language Program Courses 

First Year 100-Level Elementary Courses Emphasis on 
developing basic language skills for oral and written communi- 
cation with special attention to diverse cultural patterns. Three to 
five academic hours of class instruction per week supplemented 
by individual language laboratory work. A "native" speaker of a 
foreign language cannot enroll in or eam credit toward gradua- 
tion in a lOO-level course. 

Second Year 200-LeveI Intermediate Courses Emphasis 
on cultural pattems and contrasts between cultures, refinement 
of basic language skills, study of more complex grammatical 
structures, and expansion of vocabulary in a cultural context. 
Three to five academic hours of class instruction per week sup- 
plemented by individual language laboratory work. A "native" 
speaker of a foreign language cannot enroll in or eam credit to- 
ward graduarion in a 200-level course. 

Tliird Year 300-LeveI Non-topics Courses Emphasis on 
advanced language use and refinement of complex grammatical 
structures, focusing on culuirally-specific contexts. Three aca- 
demic hours of class instruction per week. A "native" speaker of 
a foreign language cannot enroll in or eam credit toward gradua- 
rion in a 300-level non-topics course. 

300-, 400- and 500-LeveI Topics Courses Topics courses 
taught in the target language designed for both majors and 
nonmajors. 

300- and 400-Level Civilization Courses Multi-faceted ap- 
proach to the survey of a target civilization designed for both 
majors and nonmajors. 

Note: A "native" speaker of a foreign language is defined as a per- 
son whose pre-college level instruction was conducted princi- 
pally in that language. Students who have significant knowledge 
of a foreign language gained outside of pre-college instruction 
may also be considered by LFS to be "native" speakers, but may 
have valid reasons for sftidying the language at the 300 level or 
lower. Requests for such consideration will be evaluated on a 



Language and Foreign Studies 1 33 



case-by-case basis, and should be directed to tiic chair of the De- 
partment of Language and Foreign Studies. 

B.A. in French, German, Russian, or 
Spanisii Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Students must be approved by the department for formal ad- 
mission to the major. Language course work may be waived if 
high school or other preparation warrants it. Placement will be 
made in consultation with a departmental advisor. 
Majors 

French, German, Russian, or Spanish Studies 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• French, German or Spanish: 39 credit hours with grades of C 
or better Prerequisite: completion of intennediate language 
level. 

Russian: 36 credit hours with grades of C or better. 
Prerequisite: completion of intermediate language level. 

• One of the following field concentrations: 

1 2 credit hours in a second foreign language at any level 
or 

1 2 credit hours in area studies in the major field at the 300 
level or above 
or 

Teacher education leading to certification to teach a foreign 
language (French, Gemnan, or Spanish) at the secondary level 
or 

An approved minor related to the major field; for example, 
another language, business administration, communication, 
economics, political science, history, sociology, literature, 
anthropology, or international studies 
Course Requirements 

French (39 credit hours) 

• FREN-322 Advanced French I (3) (may be replaced by 
other 400-level courses if warranted by language 
proficiency) 

• FREN-323 Advanced French II (3) (may be replaced by 
other 400-level courses if warranted by language 
proficiency) 

• FREN-431 Civilisation Fran(,aise 1 0) 



• FREN-432 Civilisation Fran(,-aise // ( 3 ) 

• FREN^80 Senior Capstone: Concept of the City (3) 

• 3 credit hours of linguistics course work from the following: 
ANTH-225 Language and Human Experience 1 :2 (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 

TESL-5xx course as approved by advisor 

• Remaining credit hours at the 400-level or above in French 
studies 

German (39 credit hours) 

• GERM-332 German Conversation and Composition I (3) 
(may be replaced by otlier 300- or 400-level courses if 
warranted by language proficiency) 

• GERM-333 German Conversation and Composition II (3) 
(may be replaced by other 300- or 400- level courses if 
warranted by language proficiency) 

• GERM-438 German Civilization I (3) 

• GERM-439 German Civilization II (3) 

• GERM-480 Senior Capstone: Concept of the City (3) 

• 3 credit hours of linguistics course work from the following: 
ANTH-225 Language and Human Experience 1 :2 (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 

TESL-5xx course as approved by advisor 

• Remaining credit hours chosen from 30O-400-level courses, 
independent study projects, internships, and topics courses in 
German studies 

Russian (36 credit hours) 

• RUSS-342 Russian Conversation and Composition 1(3) 

• RUSS-343 Russian Conversation and Composition 11(3) 

• RUSS-480 Senior Capstone: Concept of the City (3) 

• 3 credit hours of linguistics course work from the following: 
ANTH-225 Language and Human Experience 1 :2 (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 

TESL-5xx course as approved by advisor 

• Remaining credit hours chosen from 300-500-level courses, 
independent study, and internships 

Spanish (39 credit hours) 

• SPAN-352 Spanish Conversation and Composition I (3) 
(may be replaced by other 300- or 500-level course if 
warranted by language proficiency) 

• SPAN-353 Spanish Conversation and Composition II (3) 
(may be replaced by other 300- or 500-level course if 
warranted by language proficiency) 

• SPAN-357 Introduction to Latin American Literature (3) 

• SPAN-450 Spanish Civilization I; Spain (3) 

• SPAN-480 Senior Capstone: Concept of the City (3) 

• SPAN-491 Internship: Spanish (2-6) 

• 3 credit hours of Latin American culture and society course 
work as approved by advisor 

• 3 credit hours of linguistics course work from the following: 



134 College of Arts and Sciences 



ANTH-225 Language and Human Experience 1 :2 (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and CulUire (3) 
SPAN-356 Spanish Topics (3) (approved topic) 
SPAN-361 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 
TESL-5xx course as approved by advisor 

• Remaining credit hours chosen from Spanish topics, 
colloquium, and literature courses 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to 
earn both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its ac- 
celerated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate sUi- 
dents may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required 
for the graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements 
for both degree programs. The department that oversees the 
graduate program the smdent enters will determine if the 
courses the undergraduate student completes will satisfy mas- 
ter's degree requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the 
master's degree requirements within three years from the date 
of first enrollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Arabic, Frencli, German, 
Russian, or Spanisli Language 

Requirements 

• 24 credit hours with grades of C or better in courses taught in 
the language (Arabic, French, German, Russian, or Spanish) 
with 1 2 credit hours at the 300 level or above; or a total of 1 8 
credit hours at the 300 level or above. At least 1 2 credit hours 
must be unique to the minor. 

Minor in Cliinese or Japanese Language 

Requirements 

• 24 credit hours with grades of C or better with 6 credit hours 
at the 300 level or above; at least 1 2 credit hours must be 
unique to the minor. 



Minor in Russian Studies 



Requirements 

• LFS-200 Russia and the United States 3:2 (3) 

• 1 5 credit hours with grades of C or better in Russian studies 
from course offerings in at least three different departments. 
Nine of these 1 5 credit hours must be at the 300 level or above. 
At least 12 credit hours must be unique to the minor. 

B.A. in Foreign Language and 
Communication Media 

Admission to the Program 

Students are admitted either to the School of Communication 
or to the Department of Language and Foreign Studies in the 
College of Arts and Sciences. Formal admission to the Foreign 
Language and Communication Media (FLCM) major requires a 
cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.50. Students who are 
unable to achieve a 2.50 GPA and declare a major in FLCM are 
not allowed to take courses m the School of Communication af- 
ter they have completed 60 credit hours of undergraduate credit. 
Program Tracks 

French, German, Russian, or Spanish combined with Broad- 
cast Journalism, Print Journalism, Public Communication, or 
Film and Media Arts 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each of 
five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 57 credit hours widi grades of Cor better 

• Prerequisite competency in the major language at the 
intermediate level 

Course Requirements 

Foundation (6 credit hours) 

• COMM- 1 00 Understanding Media 4: 1 (3) 

• COMM-200 Writing for Mass Communication (3) 

Foreign Language (18 credit hours) 

• 1 8 credit hours of courses in the major language (French, 
German, Russian, or Spanish) at the 300 level or above taken 
in the Department of Language and Foreign Studies 

Contemporary Culture (6 credit hours) 

• Two courses related to any contemporary culture as approved 
by advisor 



Language and Foreign Studies 135 



Linguistics (3 credit hours) 

• One of the following: 

ANTH-225 Language and Human Experience 1 :2 (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 
TESL-5xx linguistics course as approved by advisor 
Communication (24 credit hours) 

• Three media studies courses from the School of 
Communication, with at least one at the 300-level or above; 
and five professional courses in one of the four 
communication program tracks: broadcast journalism, print 
journalism, public communication, or visual media: 

Broadcast Journalism 

• Three media studies courses with at least one at the 300-level 
or above, as approved by advisor 

• COMM-320 Reporting (3) 

• COMM-333 Fundamentals of TV and VTR (3) 

• COMM-385 Broadcast Journalism 1 (3) 

• COMM-428 Broadcast Journalism 11 (3) 

• COMM-432 Television Field Reporting (3) 
Prim Journalism 

• Three media studies courses with at least one at the 300-level 
or above, as approved by advisor 

• COMM-320 Reporting (3) 

• COMM-322 Editorial Policies and Methods (3) 

• COMM-425 Advanced Reporting (3) 

• Two from the following: 

COMM-323 Computer Techniques for Communication 

Studies (3) 
COMM-325 Feamre Article Writing (3) 
COMM-326 Sports Journalism (3) 
COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 
COMM-502 In-Depth Journalism (3) 
COMM-521 Opinion Writing (3) 
COMM-545 Business and Economic Journalism (3) 
Public Communication 

• COMM-209 Communication and Society (3) 

• Two additional media studies courses with at least one at the 
300-level or above, as approved by advisor 

• COMM-301 Public Relations (3) 

• COMM-337 Public Relations Writing (3) 

• COMM-346 Public Relations Case Studies (3) 

• COMM-380 Public Communication Research (3) 

• COMM-437 Public Relations Media (3) 
Film and Media Arts 

• COMM-105 Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 

• Two additional media studies courses with at least one at the 
300-level or above, as approved by advisor 

• COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

• COMM-331 Film and Video Production I (3) 



• COMM-350 Digital Imaging and Design (3) 

• COMM-382 Writing for Visual Media (3) 

• One additional course approved by advisor 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options ( 1 00-200-level Honors classes); 
Level 11 Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 

Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

B.A. in Language and Area Studies 

The B.A. in Language and Area Studies is designed for stu- 
dents with a strong interest in a region of the world and in a lan- 
guage of that region. This innovative program achieves a 
balance between humanities and social sciences courses, com- 
bined with an advanced level of foreign language study. The 
program, jointly designed and administered by the College of 
Arts and Sciences (CAS) and the School of International Ser- 
vice (SIS), builds on the strengths of the CAS Department of 
Language and Foreign Studies (LFS) and the SIS field of Com- 
parative and Regional Studies. 

Admission to the Program 

To be considered for freshman admission, an applicant 
should have earned at least a 3.00 average in secondary school. 
Students from other regionally accredited collegiate institu- 
tions, and students in other programs at American University 
who have completed the freshman year, should maintain a cu- 
mulative grade point average of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) to be con- 
sidered for transfer to the program. 



136 College of Arts and Sciences 



Majors 

French/Europe, German/Europe, Russian/ Area Studies, or 
Spanish/Latin America 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course from an approved sequence 
from each of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 51 credit hours with grades of C or better 

• Proficiency in the appropriate foreign language 
demonstrated by achieving a B (3.00) average or better for 
all course work in the foreign language taken in the 
Department of Language and Foreign Studies. 
Students may, where appropriate, and with Faculty 
Advisory Committee approval, select special topics courses 
to fiilfill requirements. Student may also apply up to 3 credit 
hours toward the major fi'om an approved internship or 
cooperative education field experience. Study abroad course 
credits may be used toward the major with the approval of 
the Faculty Advisory Committee. 

Course Requirements 

Foundation Courses (9 credit hours) 

• SIS-105WorldPohtics3:l(3) 

• One intercultural communication course from the following: 
SlS-140 Cross Cultural Communication 3:1 (3) 
SIS-340 Foundations of International Communication (3) 
SIS-341 Intercultural Communication (3) 

• One comparative politics course from the following: 
GOVT- 130 Comparative Politics 3: 1 (3) 
GOVT-23 1 Third World Politics (3) 
GOVT-232 Politics of Post industrial Societies (3) 

Foreign Language Courses (18 credit hours) 

• 1 8 credit hours of course work in a single foreign language at 
the 300 level or above. 

Area Studies (21 credit hours) 

• 15 credit hours, with 12 credit hours at the 300 level or 
above, in humanities courses, including 3 credit hours from 
the Department of History (HlST-xxx) and an additional 3 
credit hours of course work with a strong historical 
component, from the following. Other appropriate area 
studies courses may be substituted with the approval of the 
major advisor 



French/Europe 

FREN-43 1 Civilisation FraiiQaise I (3) 

FREN-432 Civilisation Fran<;aise II (3) 

FREN-433 French Topics (3) 

FREN-434 French Translation: Concepts and Practice (3) 

FREN-436 Le Fran^ais Commercial (3) 

FREN-43 7 Les Registres dii Fran(;ais (3) 

PHlL-31 1 Modem European Movements (3) 
German/Europe 

GERM-336 German Topics (3) 

GERM-338 Introduction to Gemian Translation (3) 

GERM-432 Smdies in German Film (3) 

GERM-433 German Lyric Poetry (3) 

GERM-438 German Civilization I (3) 

GERM-439 German Civihzation 11 (3) 

HIST-239 Modem Germany since 1848 (3) 

HlST-3 1 8 Nazi Germany (3) 

LFS-230 The Modernist Explosion: Culture and Ideology in 
Europe (3) 

PHlL-31 1 Modem European Movements (3) 
Russian/Area Studies 

HIST-225 Russia and the Origins of Contemporary 
Eurasia 3:2 (3) 

HIST-230 Early Russian History, 988-1700 (3) 

HIST-231 Imperial Russia, 1700-1917(3) 

HlST-232 Twentieth Century Russia (3) 

HlST-345 Russian Studies (3) (topics) 

RUSS-347 Introduction to Russian Literature (3) 

RUSS-441 Russian Media and Political Translafion (3) 

RUSS-548 Russian Topics (3) 
Spanish/Latin America 

HIST-241 Colonial Latin America (3) 

HIST-242 Latin America since Independence (3) 

HIST-340 Larin American Studies (3) (topics) 

LFS-210 Latin America: History, Art, Literature 3:2 (3) 

SPAN-356 Spanish Topics (3) 

SPAN-357 Introduction to Latin American Literature (3) 

SPAN-358 Introduction to Spanish Translation (3) 

SPAN-359 Advanced Spanish Translation (3) 

SPAN-450 Spanish Civilization I: Spain (3) 

SPAN-491 Spanish Internship: Proyecto Amistad (2-6) 

SPAN-554 Classics of Latin American Literature (3) 

SPAN-559 Colloquium on Latin America (3) 
• 6 credit hours of course work in social science courses, 

selected from the following. Other appropriate area studies 

courses may be substituted with the approval of the major 

advisor 
French/Europe 

ANTH-339 CulUire Area Analysis (3) (topics) 

ECON-318 Economic History (3) 

ECON-351 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 

GOVT-232 Politics of Postindustnal Societies (3) 



Language and Foreign Studies 1 37 



GOVT-432 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Countries (3) (topics) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
SlS-331 Overview of the European Union (3) 
SIS-355 European Foreign and Security Policy (3) 
SlS-530 Colloquium on the Common Market (3) 
SlS-557 Foreign Policy Formulation in West European 

States (3) 

German/Europe 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 

ECON-318 Economic History (3) 

ECON-351 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 

GOVT-232 Politics of Postindustrial Societies (3) 

GOVT-432 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Countries (3) (topics) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
HIST-239 Modem Germany since 1848 (3) 
HIST-3 1 8 Nazi Germany (3) 
SIS-33 1 Overview of the European Union (3) 
SlS-355 European Foreign and Security Policy (3) 
SlS-530 Colloquium on the Common Market (3) 
SlS-551 Economy, Politics and Society in Europe (3) 
SIS-557 Foreign Policy Formulation in West 

European States (3) 

Russian/Area Studies 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 

ECON-318 Economic History (3) 

ECON-351 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 

KCON-552 Economics of Transition (3) 

GOVT-432 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Countries: Former USSR (3) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions; Eastern Europe (3) 
HIST-225 Russia and the Oigins of Contemporary 

Eurasia 3:2 (3) 
HIST-230 Early Russian History, 988-1700 (3) 
HIST-231 Imperial Russia, 1700-1917 (3) 
HIST-232 Twentieth Century Russia (3) 
HIST-345 Russian Studies (3) (topics) 
LFS-200 Russia and the United States 3:2 (3) 
SIS-258 Contemporary Russia (3) 
SlS-381 Foreign Policies of the Great Powers (3) 
SIS-558 Authontananism and Democracy in Russia (3) 

Spanish/Latin America 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
ECON-351 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 
ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 
ECON-318 Economic History (3) 



GOVT-432 Political histitutions and Processes in Selected 

Countries (3) (topics) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
HIST-241 Colonial Latin America (3) 
HIST-242 Latin America since Independence (3) 
HIST-340 Latin American Studies (3) (topics) 
SIS-276 Contemporary Latin America (3) 
SIS-337 International Development (3) 
SIS-577 International Relations of the Americas (3) 
SOCY-531 Regional Studies in Social Change: 

Latin America (3) 
Senior Capstone (3 credit hours) 
• Students enroll either in an SIS comparative seminar or in an 
approved topics or seminar course in Language and Foreign 
Smdies 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 1 00-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-levcl and above Honors classes): and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more infonna- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Baciielor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers sUidents the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate smdents 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Language and Area Studies 

• 24 credit hours w ith grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• 12 credit hours in the Department of Language and Foreign 
Studies at the 200 level or above, including two courses at the 
300 level. 



138 College of Arts and Sciences 



• 12 credit hours selected from an approved list of courses in 
area studies: 

Courses include those from anthropology' (ANTH-xxx). 
economics (ECON-x.xx). historv' (HIST-xxx). international 
studies (SIS-xxx). literature (LIT-xxx). or sociology 
(SOCY-xxx): one 3-credit course must be at the 300 level or 
above from SIS: one 3-credit course must be from history. 

• Areas offered: 

French'Europe, German/Europe, Russian/Area Studies, 
SpanishLatin America: see list of approved courses for 
major in Language and Area Studies, above. 
Italian'Europe, Japanese/Asia: consult LAS degree program 
advisor for appro\ al of courses for this minor 

Undergraduate Certificate in Translation 

Students receive an Undergraduate Certificate in French, 
German. Russian, or Spanish by completing 1 5 credit hours of 
course work according to the sequence required for their par- 
ticular language. All courses taken in the Department of Lan- 
guage and Foreign Studies toward the certificate may be used 
by undergraduates toward departmental majors or minors in 
the same language. 

The emphasis of this program is on translation into Eng- 
lish. This certificate program provides students with an aca- 
demic grounding in translation theoPi' and practice. Students 
interested in obtaining further translation credentials are en- 
couraged to discuss their options with the appropriate lan- 
guage advisor. 

For core courses to count toward the certificate, students 
must receive a grade of B or better: for elective courses, a 
grade of C or better is required. For non-core courses, students 
complete an additional translation project beyond the normal 
course requirements and must receive a satisfactory e\ aluation 
for their project. Students will only be permitted to do these 
translation projects after having completed at least one of the 
first Uvo core courses. 
Admission to the Program 

Open to all students who have completed the appropriate 
300-level Conversation and Composition II or Advanced II 
language course, or equivalent. Equivalency is determined in 
consultation with faculty ad\isor. Students whose native lan- 
guage is not English must meet uni\ersity requirements for 
English competenc)' (minimum TOEFL score of 600). Before 
commencing the program, students should consult the appro- 
priate advisor in the Department of Language and Foreign 
Studies to plan out their program of study. 

Frencii Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements 

Core 

• FREN-434 French Translation: Concepts and Practice (3) 

• FREN-435 French Translation Workshop (3) 

• At least one of the following: 
FREN-430 SynkLxe et Style du Fran<;ais (3) 



FREN-436 Le Francois Commercial (3) 
FREN-437 Les Registres du Frangais (3) 
Electives 

• Two courses selected from the other core courses or from 
offerings in French at the 400-level 

German Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements 

Core 

• GERM-338 Introduction to German Translation (3) 

• GERM-339 Business German (3) 

Electives 

• Three courses selected from offerings in German at the level of 
GERM-336 or above 

Russian Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements 

Core 

• RUSS^44I Russian Media and Political Translation (3) 

• RUSS-443 Russian Business Translation (3) 

• One of the following: 

RUSS-546 Russian Advanced Grammar and 

Composition I (3) 
RUSS-547 Russian .Advanced Grammar and 
Composition II (3) 
Electives 

• Two courses selected from the other core course or from 
offerings in Russian at the le\el of RUSS-347 or above. 

Spanish Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements 

Core 

• SPAN-358 Introduction to Spanish Translation (3) 

• SPAN-359 Advanced Spanish Translation (3) 

• One of the following: 

SPAN-361 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 
SPAN-356 Spanish Topics: Applied Spanish Linguistics (3) 
Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition (3) 
Electives 

• Two courses selected from the other core courses or from 
offerings in Spanish at the level of SPAN-356 or above. 

M.A. in Spanish: Latin American Studies 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, applicants should be proficient in Spanish, fa- 
miliar with the culture, and normally hold a B.A. in Spanish. 
Both part-time and ftill-time smdents are welcome in the pro- 
gram. Applicants are required to submit a sample of written 
work in Spanish as part of their formal application to the pro- 
gram. 



Language and Foreign Studies 1 39 



Degree Requirements 

• 33 credit hours of approved graduate work, with at least 21 
credit hours in courses taught in Spanish. Course work 
includes 21 credit hours of core requirements and 12 credit 
hours in a field of concentration. 

Students may earn up to 9 graduate credit hours abroad, 
applied either to the core or the field of concentration (or 
both), as approved by advisor. 

• Research requirement; two substantial research papers from 
SPAN-705 Seminar in Spanish and Latin American 
Studies with grades of B or better 

• Comprehensive examination: two-part written 
comprehensive exam, one part in Spanish, one part in either 
Spanish or English. The core is covered in the first part and 
the field of concentration in the second. The comprehensive 
examination is given twice a year, toward the end of each 
semester 

Course Requirements 

Core Courses (21 credit hours) 

• SPAN-705 Seminar in Spanish and Latin American 
Studies (3) (taken three times for a total of 9 credit hours) 

• One course from the following: 

SPAN-554 Classics of Latin American Literature (3) 
SPAN-656 Spanish Topics (3) (approved literature or 
culture topic) 

• One course fi'om the following: 

SPAN-656 Spanish Topics (approved language-related 

topic) 
SPAN-658 Introduction to Spanish Translation (3) 
SPAN-661 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

• One course in Latin American history, politics, international 
relations, or economics from the following: 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions (3) (Latin American topics) 
HIST-640 Latin American Studies (3) 
SlS-577 International Relations of Latin America (3) 
or other approved course 

• Elective (3) 

Field of Concentration (12 credit hours) 

• Students construct a field of concentration, in consultation 
with an advisor, in one of the following areas: 

Related studies (e.g., economics, history, international 
studies, communication, public affairs) 
LiteraUire and culture 
Language teaching 

Linguistics, language, and translation (Students can also 
complete a Graduate Certificate in Spanish Translation.) 
Co-ops and internships are encouraged and are nonnally 
credited uithin the field of concentration. They are usually 
taken pass/fail and can be done either locally (through 
SPAN-691 Pmyecio AmmaJ) or abroad. A maximum of 3 
credit hours of co-op or internship can be applied to the degree. 



Graduate Certificate in Translation 

Students receive a Graduate Certificate in French, Russian, 
or Spanish by completing 15 credit hours of course work ac- 
cording to the required sequence for the particular language. All 
courses taken in the Department of Language and Foreign 
Studies toward the certificate may be used by graduate students 
toward the master's degree in the same language. 

The emphasis of this program is on translation into English. 
This certificate program provides students with an academic 
grounding in translation theory and practice. Students interested 
in obtaining fijrther translation credentials are encouraged to 
discuss their options with the appropriate language advisor. 

For core courses to count toward the certificate, students 
must receive a grade of B or better. For non-core courses, stu- 
dents complete an additional translation project beyond the nor- 
mal course requirements and must receive a satisfactory 
evaluation for their project. Students will only be permitted to 
do these translation projects after having completed at least one 
of the first two core courses. Students must have an overall 3.00 
grade point average in certificate courses in order to be awarded 
the certificate. 
Admission to the Program 

Open to students who have a bachelor's degree. If the under- 
graduate degree is not in the language for which they wish to 
obtain a certificate, students must have completed the appropri- 
ate 300-level Conversation and Composition II or Advanced II 
language course, or equivalent. Equivalency is detemiined in 
consultation with the faculty advisor Students whose native 
language is not English must meet university requirements for 
English competency (minimum TOEFL score of 600). Before 
commencing the program, students should consult the appro- 
priate advisor in the Department of Language and Foreign 
Studies to plan their program of study. 

French Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements (15 credit hours) 

Core 

• FREN-634 French Translation: Concepts and Practice (3) 

• FREN-635 French Translation Workshop (3) 

• One of the following: 

FREN-630 Syntaxe el Sti'le dii Frainais (3) 
FREN-636 Le Fnm(;ais Commercial O) 
FREN-637 Les Regislivs dii Fnimais (3) 

Electives 

• Two courses selected fi'om the other courses on the core 
course list or from otTerings in French at the 500 level or 
above. 

Russian Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements (15 credit hours) 

Core Courses 

• RUSS-641 Russian Media and Political Translation (3) 



140 College of Arts and Sciences 



• RUSS-643 Russian Business Translation (3) 

• One of the following: 

RUSS-546 Russian Advanced Grammar and 

Composition I (3) 
RUSS-547 Russian Advanced Grammar and 
Composition 11 (3) 

Electives 

• Two courses may include the other course on the core course 
list or be selected from offerings in Russian at the 500 level 
or above. 



Spanish Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements (15 credit hours) 
Core 

• SPAN-658 Introduction to Spanish Translation (3) 

• SPAN-659 Advanced Spanish Translation (3) 

• One of the following: 

SPAN-656 Spanish Topics (approved language-related topic) 
SPAN-661 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 
Electives 

• Two courses selected from the other core courses or from 
offerings in Spanish at the 500 level or above. 



Liberal Studies 



B.A. in Liberal Studies 



This program is designed for students eight years or more 
out of high school who seek a flexible degree program that en- 
courages them to bring together their personal and profes- 
sional goals in the design of their academic major The major 
encourages students to combine liberal arts studies with a spe- 
cialization. Specializations are available in any of the minors 
offered by American University. 
Admission to the Program 

After admission, students submit a written proposal stating 
their core interests, along with a 300-word essay explaining 
their goals and the relationship among chosen areas and 
courses. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total of ten courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course from each of the five curricular 
areas in an approved sequence 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 



Major Requirements 

• 42-^8 credit hours with grades of C or better 

The major consists of a 24 credit hour core area and an 1 8-24 
credit hour specialization, both of which offer a number of 
structured alternative choices. 
Core Area 

• 24 credit hours chosen from fields of study in one of three core 
areas: the humanities, the social sciences, or sciences/ 
mathematics. 

The core area must include course work in four fields of study: 
6 credit hours are to be taken in each field: at least 3 credit 
hours in each of the four fields must be earned in a course at the 
300 level or higher. For students taking the 
Sciences/Mathematics core, a minimum of 6 credit hours in 
total must be taken in courses at the 300 level or higher No 
more than three courses taken for General Educafion credit 
may also count toward core area requirements. Six of the eight 
courses taken to fialfill the core area must be offered by the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 



Literature 141 



Fields of Study by Core Area 
Humanities 

Art 

Art History 

Foreign Language 

Jewish Studies 

Literature 

Perfonning Arts 

Philosophy 

Religion 



Social Sciences 

American Studies 
Anthropology 
Communication 
(designated courses) * 
Economics 
Education 

(designated courses) * 
History 

Political Science 
Psychology 
(designated courses) * 
Sociology 



Sciences/Mathematics 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Computer Science 

Infonnation Systems 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Psychology 

(designated courses)* 

Statistics 
* Designated courses: academic counselors will provide stu- 
dents with a list of approved courses. 



Specialization 

In addition to the core area courses, sUidents in the Bachelor 
of Arts in Liberal Studies program are required to complete 
18-24 credit hours in a specialization chosen from the list of 
university-approved minors. Note: if the minor taken for the 
specialization requires 24 or more credit hours, students may 
request reducing their core requirements from 24 to 2 1 credit 
hours. However, the core must still include at least 18 credit 
hours offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Students may select a specialization that complements their 
core area, or they may choose a specialization that is a new area 
of study. In all cases the student is encouraged to design a core 
area and a specialization that reflects the student's particular in- 
terests and goals. 

Requirements for the specialization in the Bachelor of Arts 
in Liberal Studies degree are met when a student completes the 
requirements for a minor approved for the program. No more 
than two courses taken for General Education credit may be ap- 
plied to a student's specialization. 



Literature 



Chair Keith Leonard 
Full-Time Faculty- 
Professor Emerltus/a P. Han, J.J. Jorgens, F. L. Kelly, 
E.L. Kessler, F H. King, K.W. Moyer, J.N. Radner, 
J. A. Roberts, M. Sklarew, H.S. Taylor, F. Turaj, F.E. Zapatka 
Professor C.R. Larson, J. Loesbcrg, R. McCann, 
K. Mussell, D. Pike, R. Rubenstein, R. Sha, P Stan- 
Associate Professor Emeritus W.E. Stahr 
Associate Professor D. Keplinger, K. Leonard, M. Menon, 
J. Middents, M. Noble, D.C. Payne Fisk, A. Sherman 
Assistant Professor K. Attie, A. Berry, F. Brideoake, 
K. Dargan, E. Dussere, D. Evans, S. (irant, R. L. Snyder. 
M. Sulak, L. Voris, M. Wcnthe 
Instructor C. Bair Van Dam, E. Comstock, C. Cox, 
R. Drummond, L. Fettig, C. Garrett, D. Johnson, L. Johnson, 
P Joyner, C. Martinez, J. McCarthy, H. McDonald, 
G Moomau, S. Oakes. P. Reichler, A. Tamashasky, 
A. Thomas, K. Wilson, L. Wootton Don 
Director of the College Writing Program and 
the Writing Center J. Hynian 



Concerned with the study of literature, writing, and film, the 
Departinent of Literature offers courses that embrace many ap- 
proaches to the rich heritage of written, oral, and cinematic tra- 
dition, as well as courses that challenge students to write 
creatively and professionally. In addition to taking eoiu-ses, our 
students are encouraged to enroll in internships to sample ca- 
reers that use the skills they are developing in the classroom; 
Washington affords a wide range of job opportunities (many in- 
volving writing or editing) in settings such as arts organizations, 
radio and television, government offices, public interest organi- 
zations, museums, schools, and community groups. 

The department's faculty of scholars and writers staff three 
degree programs in literature: the B.A. and M.A. in Literature 
and the M.F.A. in Creative Writing. All three programs offer 
students the chance to study literature, film, criticism and cre- 
ative writing; all are small and tlexible programs that bring stu- 
dents and faculty into close contact in small classes and 
informal gatherings and colloquia. The M.A. program provides 
an overview of the literaiy history of our culaire in addition to a 
series of seminars on theoretical topics in which .students and 
faculty together consider what eonstiuites the discipline of liter- 
ary criticism. The M.F.A. in Creative Writing program includes 
work in fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction; workshops with 



142 College of Arts and Sciences 



distinguished visiting writers; internships; and course work in 
literature and in the arts of translation and literary journalism. 
It also offers students opportunities to give public readings, to 
meet with editors and publishers, and to produce a nationally 
known literary magazine. 

In addition, the department offers an interdisciplinary mi- 
nor in Cinema Studies which combines course work in cinema, 
video criticism and history and takes advantage of the impres- 
sive film resources of the Washington area. 
The Visiting Writers Series 

Each semester, the department sponsors public readings by 
prominent poets, fiction writers, and editors. These visitors 
also conduct workshops for graduate and undergraduate cre- 
ative writing students. Visiting writers have included Mark 
Doty, Allan Gurganus, Tillie Oisen, Andrew Holleran. Hannan 
al-Shaykh, A.J. Verdelle, Richard Selzer, Richard Rodriguez, 
Yusef Komunyakaa, Marie Howe. Michael Cunningham, 
Marilyn Nelson, Li-Young Lee, Amy Bloom, and Manil Suri. 
Distinguished Writers in Residence have included Jean Valen- 
tine, Marilyn Hacker, Jon Silkin, Pablo Medina, and Alice 
McDermott. 

B.A. in Literature 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental approval. 
Universitj' Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence fi^om 
each of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 42 credit hours with grades of C or better, with at least 2 1 
credit hours at the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• LIT- 105 The Literary Imagination 1:1 (3) 
or 

LIT- 120 Interpreting Literature 1:1(3) 

• LIT-480 Senior Project in Literature (3) 

• LIT-498 Senior Seminar on the Value of Literature (3) 

• Three survey courses trom the following with at least one of 
LIT-210orLIT-220: 

LIT- 150 Third Worid Literature 3:1 (3) 
LIT-210 Survey of American Literature I (3) 
LIT-21 1 Survey of American Literature II (3) 
LIT-220 Survey of British Literature I (3) 



L1T-22I Survey of British Literature D (3) 
LlT-225 The Afincan Writer 1:2 (3) 
LlT-235 African-American Literature 2:2 (3) 
LlT-240 Asian American Literature 2:2 (3) 
LlT-252 Survey of Literary Theory (3) 

• Four courses in literature written before 1 900, of which at least 
two must be in literature written before 1 800 

• One of the following: 

LIT-21 5 Writers in Print/in Person 1:2 
creative writing course 
300-level cinema course 

• Three additional courses offered or approved by the 
Department of Literature 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the department. 
Each department has three levels of University Honors require- 
ments: Level I Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); Level II 
Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and Level III Op- 
tions (Honors Senior Capstone). The department Honors coordi- 
nator advises students in the University Honors Program 
regarding departmental options. For more information, go to 
wtvw.american.eduyacademic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined B.A. and M.A. in Literature 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's'master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 
1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. 

This program enables students to complete both the B.A. and 
the M.A. in Literature. 
Requirements 

• Undergraduate literature majors ordinarily apply at the end of 
their junior year, but they should consult with the M.A. 
program director prior to applying. Admission decisions 
follow the procedures used to evaluate graduate applicants to 
the M.A. in Literamre. The Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) is required. Students will be admitted formally to M.A. 
status only if they have completed all requirements for the 
B.A. in Literature with at least an overall 3.00 grade point 
average and a 3.20 grade point average in literature courses. 

• All requirements for the B.A. in Literature 



Literature 143 



Undergraduate sUidents may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work in literature to satisfy 
the requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in Literature, including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Literature 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• LIT- 1 05 The Literary Imagination 1:1 (3) or 
LIT- 1 20 Interpreting Literature 1:1 (3) 

• One course from the following: 
LIT-1 50 Third World Literature 3:1 (3) 
LIT-210 Survey of American Literamre I (3) 
LIT-21 1 Survey of American Literature 11 (3) 
LIT-220 Survey of British Literature I (3) 
LIT-221 Survey of British Literature II (3) 
LIT-225 The African Writer 1:2(3) 
LIT-235 African- American Literature 2:2 (3) 
LIT-240 Asian American Literature 2:2 (3) 
LIT-252 Survey of Literary Theory (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours in literature; at least 9 credit hours must be at 
the 300 level or above. Only one course in creative writing 
and one course in film may be counted toward the minor, or if 
no creative writing course is used, two film courses may be 
counted. 

Minor in Literature: Cinema Studies 

• 24 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• COMM-105 Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 

• LIT-135 Critical Approach to the Cinema 1:1 (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours from the following: 

LIT-346 Topics in Film (3) may be repeated up to four 

times with different topics 
LIT-402 Creative Writing: Film Script (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the from the following: 
COMM-330 Principles of Photography {?>)and 

COMM-33 1 Film and Video Production 1 (3) 
COMM-511 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-512 Social Documentary (3) 
COMM-517 History of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
COMM-586 History of Czech Cinema (3) (study abroad) 



M.A. in Literature 



Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants should have a grade point 
average of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) in undergraduate literature 
courses. The Graduate Record General Examination is 
required. An undergraduate major in literature is desirable, but 
applications from candidates who have majored in other fields 
will also be considered, provided that substantial study of litera- 
ture has been done. Two letters of recommendation and a sam- 
ple of critical writing are required. Part-time as well as flill-time 
smdents are welcome in the program. 
Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work with at least 1 8 
credit hours in 500- or 700-level courses 

• A written comprehensive examination based primarily on 
literamre taught in M . A. seminars and other literature courses 

Course Requirements 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 
LIT-521 Readings in Genre: Poetry (3) 
LIT-522 Readings in Genre: Drama (3) 
LIT-523 Readings in Genre: Novel (3) 
LIT-524 Readings in Genre: Cinema (3) 

• 18 graduate credit hours in literature, with at least 9 credit 
hours at the 700 level 

Teaching 

• LIT-730 Teaching of Writing (3) 

• LIT-73 1 Teaching of Writing Practicum (3) 

• an approved graduate course in literature, education, 
linguistics, or anthropology (3) 

Pre-doctoral 

• LIT-732 Literary Theory (3) 
and 

LIT-793 Directed Research in Literature (3) plus another 700 
level course in literature 
or 

Lrr-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (6) 
or 

6 credit hours in literature at the 700 level 
General 

• 9 additional graduate credit hours in literature 

Interdisciplinary 

• 9 graduate credit hours in another department or 
departments, in a individually-designed program of study as 
approved by the M.A. program director 

M.F.A. in Creative Writing 

Admission to the Program 

Applicants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study. An undergraduate major in literature is de- 
sirable, but applications from candidates who have majored in 



144 College of Arts and Sciences 



other fields will be considered. Admission is based on samples 
of previous writing (30 pages of fiction or 15 pages of poetry), 
academic record, and two letters of recommendation. 
Degree Requirements 

• 48 credit liours of approved graduate work 

• Advancement to candidacy is automatic on admission to the 
program, but subject to yearly review 

• A boolc-length manuscript of fiction, poetry, or drama, to be 
approved by the creative writing faculty 

• One oral examination on the candidate's manuscript: its 
merits, characteristics, and relations to the works of others 

Course Requirements 

• 12 credit hours in writing workshops: 
LIT-700 Advanced Fiction Workshop (3) 
LlT-701 Advanced Poetry Workshop (3) 
LlT-702 Creative Writing: Film Script (3) 

Students may concentrate on one genre or work in several 

• 1 2 credit hours in literature courses selected from among the 
regular graduate level literature offerings of the department 

Mathematics and Statistics 



• LlT-705 Seminar on Translation (3) 

• LIT-710 Art of Literary Joumalism (3) 

• LlT-691 Graduate Internship (6) 

Possible internship sites include the Writer's Center in 
Bethesda, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Library of 
Congress, the Writers-in-the-Schools programs, and 
affiliations with in-house and trade publishers. 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

Additional writing workshops, offered at American 

University or elsewhere 

Additional courses in literature, cinema studies, or performing 

arts 

With the approval of an advisor, courses in foreign languages. 

joumalism, or in any other discipline which seems germane to 

the individual student's interest and consistent with the 

objectives of the program 

• 6 credit hours of LlT-797 Master's Thesis Seminar 



Chair Jeffrey Hakim 

Full-time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus D, Crosby, R. Holzsager, 

B. Korin, H. Rosenblatt, S. Schot 

Professor S. Casey, A. Enayat, M. Gray, J. Hakim, 

R. Jemigan, D. Kalman, J. Nolan 

Associate Professor Emeritus A. Amirdjanov, A. Barron, 

L. Crone, I.L. Chang. E. McCue 

Associate Professor J. Adler, A. Elezi, J. Lansky, 

V. Stallings, FVan Dyke 

Assistant Professor Emerita C. Machlin 

Assistant Professor U. Alparslan, M. Jackson, J. Lu. 

E. Malloy, I. Maslova, 

Instructor N. Florescastillo, S. Forgoston, I. Miller, 

E. Naser, R. Richter 

Director of Undergraduate Studies M. Keynes 

Mathematics may be studied as an intellectual discipline 
for its own sake or as a professional tool for application to the 
problems of other disciplines. Majors in mathematics receive 
firm grounding in the theory and techniques of algebra, analy- 
sis, and other fields as a basis for further work in pure or ap- 
plied mathematics and for graduate studies. The major in 
applied mathematics oft'ers training in mathematical prob- 
lem-solving techniques with a reduced emphasis on abstract 
theory. This program is not as firm a foundation for graduate 
work as the mathematics major, but is tailored to the student 
who will need to apply mathematical, statistical, and computer 
methods to practical problems. Undergraduates majoring in 
mathematics may choose to take a second major in secondary 
school teaching. 



Statistics is concemed with the collection, organization, anal- 
ysis, interpretation, and presentation of numerical data. The sci- 
ence of statistics is a broad and challenging field. Its breadth can 
be seen in the way its ideas and techniques have found applica- 
tion in almost every field of study. Statistics has contributed or- 
ganizational and analytical techniques that provide new insights 
in fields that range from the physical and life sciences to busi- 
ness, law, history, literature, and the social sciences. 

Undergraduate students majoring in statistics have two tracks 
available. Those who intend to continue with graduate work in 
statistics or those with an interest in the theory of statistical 
methods should follow the sequence for mathematical statistics, 
which requires a strong background in mathematics. Students 
wishing an emphasis in the use of statistical techniques should 
follow the sequence for applied statistics. This track is especially 
appropriate as a secondary emphasis for students who have a 
strong interest in a field of application. 

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics combines the 
resources and knowledge of these related disciplines. This en- 
ables the deparmrent to otfer unusually varied and flexible pro- 
grams. A student with an interest in the mathematical sciences 
may choose a program within the department and later change 
his or her emphasis without a great loss of time because the pro- 
grams share a common core. 

The university's Washington. D.C. location affords the stu- 
dent access to many governmental, cultural, scientific, and his- 
torical institutions. These institutions serve as an important 
research resource. In addition, they are a source of fijll-time and 
part-time employment opportunities for students with a finn 
grounding in the mathematical sciences. 



Mathematics and Statistics 145 



Special Opportunities 

• The department employs undergraduates in its tutoring lab 
and the computer labs. 

• The department offers a limited number of undergraduate 
book scholarships. 

B.S. in Applied Mathematics 

Admission to the Program 

Fonnal admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental ap- 
proval. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 57 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• CSC-28 1 Introduction to Computer Science II (3) 

• MATH-22I Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 

• MATH-313 Calculus 111(4) 

• MATH-3 10 Linear Algebra (3) 

• MATH-321 Differential Equations (3) 

• MATH-501 Probability (3) 

• MATH-550 Complex Analysis (3) 

• MATH-551 Partial Differential Equations (3) 

• MATH-560 Numerical Analysis: Basic Problems (3) 

• STAT-502 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3) 

• Three additional mathematics electives, to be selected in 
consultation with the student's advisor 

Related Courses 

• PHYS- 1 1 University Physics I 5: 1 (4) 

• PHYS-210 University Physics II 5:2 (4) 

or altemative science courses approved by advisor 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 



ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 

Combined B.S. in Applied Mathematics and M.A. in 
Mathematics 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at 
least 1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the 
bachelor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential 
enrollment in the two programs. 

This program enables students to earn both a B.S. in Ap- 
plied Mathematics and an M.A. in Mathematics. 

Requirements 

• All requirements for the B.S. in Applied Mathematics 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work to satisfy the 
requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in Mathematics, including a 
minimum of IS credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

B.S. in Mathematics 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental ap- 
proval. 

Smdents who wish to obtain credentials for teaching grade 
7-12 mathematics may take a 36-crcdit hour second major Stu- 
dents must have a 3 .00 grade point average to be admitted to the 
second major in secondary education. For infomiation on ad- 
mission and program requirements, see the School of Educa- 
tion, Teaching and Health secondary education prograins. 

University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 



146 College of Arts and Sciences 



General Education Requirements 

• A total of ten courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence from 
each of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 52 credit hours with grades of C or better 

Students who elect a second major in secondary school 
mathematics teaching take a total of 53 credit hours for the 
mathematics major (see course requirements below) 
Course Requirements 

• CSC -280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• MATH-221 Calculus 1(4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 

• MATH-313 Calculus III (4) 

• MATH-3 1 Linear Algebra ( 3 ) 

• MATH-504 Advanced Calculus of Several Variables (3) 

• MATH-5 12 Introduction to Modem Algebra (3) 

• MATH-5 1 3 Rings and Fields (3) 

• MATH-520 Introduction to Analysis (3) 

• MATH-521 Measure Theory and Integration (3) 

• Three courses selected from the following: 
MATH-321 Differential Equations (3) 
MATH-501 Probability (3) 

MATH-503 Foundations of Mathematics (3) 

MATH-505 Mathematical Logic (3) 

MATH-508 Automata, Languages and Computability (3) 

MATH-510 Geometry (3) 

MATH-5 1 5 Number Theory (3) 

MATH-540 Topology (3) 

MATH-550 Complex Analysis (3) 

MATH-551 Partial Differential Equations (3) 

MATH-560 Numerical Analysis: Basic Problems (3) 

MATH-570 History of Mathematics (3) 

MATH-601 Hamionic Analysis (3) 

STAT-502 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3) 

• Three courses in a field of application, to be selected in 
consultation with the advisor This requirement may be 
waived for students with more than one major in this 
department. 

Mathematics Majors with a Second Major in 
Secondary Education 
Course Requirements 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 

• MATH-3 13 Calculus III (4) 

• MATH-3 10 Linear Algebra (3) 

• MATH-500 Advanced Calculus of Several Variables (3) 



• MATH-501 Probability (3) 

• MATH-510 Geometry (3) 

• MATH-5 12 Introduction to Modem Algebra (3) 

• MATH-585 Mathematics Education (3) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• STAT-502 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3) 

• Two courses selected from the following: 
MATH-321 Differential Equations (3) 
MATH-503 Foundations of Mathematics (3) 
MATH-505 Mathematical Logic (3) 
MATH-5 1 5 Number Theory (3) 
MATH-540 Topology (3) 

MATH-550 Complex Analysis (3) 
MATH-551 Partial Differential Equations (3) 
MATH-560 Numerical Analysis: Basic Problems (3) 
MATH-570 History of Mathematics (3) 
MATH-601 Harmonic Analysis (3) 

• Two courses in a field of application, to be selected in 
consultation with the advisor This requirement may be 
waived for students with more than one major in this 
department. 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the department. 
Each department has three levels of University Honors require- 
ments: Level 1 Options (1 00-200-level Honors classes); Level 11 
Options {300-level and above Honors classes); and Level III Op- 
tions (Honors Senior Capstone). The department Honors coordi- 
nator advises students in the University Honors Program 
regarding departmental options. For more infonnation, go to 
wvyw.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 

Combined B.S. in Mathematics and M.A. In 
Mathematics 

American University offers students the opportunity to cam 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 
1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. 

This program enables students to eam both a B.S. in Mathe- 
matics and an M.A. in Mathematics. 



Mathematics and Statistics 147 



Requirements 

• Undergraduate students should apply by the end of the junior 
year. Students should have a minimum grade point average of 
3.20 in major courses and have completed one of the 
following sequences: 

MATH-512 Introduction to Modem Algebra and 

MATH-5 1 3 Rings and Fields 
or 

• MATH-520 Introduction to Analysis I and 
MATH-52 1 Measure Tlieory and Integration 

• All requirements for the B.S. in Mathematics 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work to satisfy the 
requirements of both degrees. 

• .Ml requirements for the M.A. in Mathematics, including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

B.S. in Statistics 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental ap- 
proval. 
Traciis 

Mathematical Statistics and Applied Statistics 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or tlie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five cumcular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• Mathematical Statistics: 47 credit hours with grades of C or 
better 

• Applied Statistics: 54-55 credit hours with grades of C or 
better 

Course Requirements 
Mathematical Statistics 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• MATH-22I Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 

• MATH-313 Calculus III (4) 

• M ATH-3 1 Linear Algebra (3 ) 



• MATH-501 Probability (3) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• STAT-502 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3) 

• STAT-515 Regression (3) 

• STAT-5 1 6 Design of Experiments (3 ) 

• Four additional courses at or above 300 in the department, of 
which two must have the prefix STAT- (STAT-5 1 4 cannot be 
used and STAT-300 and STAT-302 cannot both be used) as 
approved by an advisor. CSC-28 1 may substitute for a course 
with a prefix of MATH-. 

Applied Statistics 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• MATH-2 1 1 Applied Calculus I (4) arid 
MATH-2 12 Applied Calculus n (3) 

or 

MATH-221 Calculus I (4) and 

MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 

• MATH-310 Linear Algebra (3) 

• MATH-501 Probability (3) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• STAT-300 Business and Economic Statistics (3) 
or 

STAT-302 tatermediate Statistics (3) 

• STAT-502 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3) 

• STAT-515 Regression (3) 

• STAT-5 1 6 Design of Experiments (3) 

• Two additional courses selected from the department as 
approved by a student's advisor 

• At least five additional courses in a related field, as approved 
by an advisor. The courses may be selected from more than 
one teaching unit, but must have a common theme or subject 
area in which statistics are applied. 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu academic. depts/Tionors/ . 
Combined B.S. in Mathematics or Statistics and M.S. 
in Statistics 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 



1 48 College of Arts and Sciences 



may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for 
the graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the grad- 
uate program the student enters will determine if the courses 
the undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's de- 
gree requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must com- 
plete at least 1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level 
after the bachelor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, 
sequential enrollment in the two programs. 

Students receive both a B.S. in Mathematics or Statistics 
and an M.S. in Statistics. 
Requirements 

• Interested students should apply by the end of their junior 
year. Applicants should have a minimum grade point 
average of 3.20 in major courses and complete MATH-501 
Probability and STAT-502 Introduction to Mathematical 
Statistics by the end of the junior yean 

• All requirements for the B.S. in Mathematics or Statistics 
(mathematical statistics track) 

Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work to satisfy the 
requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Mathematics, including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Mathematics 

• 19 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• MATH-310 Linear Algebra (3) 

• MATH-221 Calculus 1 (4) and 
MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 

or 

MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus I (4) and 

MATH-212 Applied Calculus II (3) 

• Three additional courses numbered IVlATH-3 13 or above or 
STAT-202 or above, with at least two courses at the 300 level 
or above 

Minor in Quantitative Methods 

• 20 credit hours with grades of C or better and with at least 1 2 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• MATH-3 10 Linear Algebra (3) 

• MATH-22 1 Calculus I (4) and 
MATH-222 Calculus H (4) 
or 



MATH-2 1 1 Applied Calculus I (4) and 
MATH-212 Apphed Calculus II (3) 

• Two courses in statistics numbered STAT-3.xx or above: 
Students may select only one of STAT-300 Business and 
Economic Statistics, STAT-302 Intermediate Statistics, or 
STAT-5 14 Statistical Methods for credit toward the minor. 

Minor in Statistics 

• 20 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• MATH-22 1 Calculus I (4) or 
MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus I (4) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• Four courses in statistics (STAT-xxx) at the 300 level or above 
(MATH-501 Probability may also be used as one of the four) 
Students may select only one of STAT-300 Business and 
Economic Statistics, STAT-302 Intermediate Statistics, or 
STAT-5 14 Statistical Methods for credit toward the minor. 

Undergraduate Certificate in 

Applied Statistics 

Admission to tlie Program 

Open to undergraduate degree and nondegree students. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 18 credit hours of approved course work with at least 9 credit 
hours at the 300-level or above, with grades of C or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 1 2 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer), A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science (4) 

• MATH-2 1 1 Applied Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-212 Applied Calculus II (3) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• STAT-300 Business and Economic Statistics (3) 
or 

STAT-302 Intermediate Statistics (3) 

or 

STAT-5 14 Statistical Methods (3) 



Mathematics and Statistics 149 



M.A. in Mathematics 



Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for admission, apphcants must have an undergraduate 
degree in mathematics or a related field. Graduate Record Ex- 
amination (GRE) scores are required. Students entering the 
M.A. program without the appropriate background will be ex- 
pected to take certain undergraduate courses as prerequisite 
work. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate course work including 
thesis or nonthesis option requirements 

• Tool of research: proficiency in Russian, German. French, or 
an approved computer language 

• Written comprehensive examination in mathematics 

• Research requirement: 

Thesis option: MATH-797 Master's Thesis Seminar in 
Mathematics (6) and an oral defense of the thesis 
Nonthesis option: MATH-690 Independent Study Project in 
Mathematics (3) (topic to be chosen in consultation with a 
faculty member) requiring an oral and written presentation of 
the research work and 3 credit hours in approved 
graduate-level independent research, seminar, or research 
course. 

All course work for the thesis or nonthesis option must be 
completed with grades of B or better. 

M.S. in Statistics 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum unixersity require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants will be expected to have an 
adequate background in the mathematical sciences. Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) scores are required. Students enter- 
ing the M.S. program without the appropnate background will 
be expected to take certain undergraduate courses as prerequi- 
site work. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30-33 credit hours of appro\ed graduate work 

• Tool of research: proficiency in French. German, Russian, an 
approved computer language, or an approved analytical skill 
such as numerical, complex, or real analysis 

• Written comprehensive examination 
Thesis option: Mathematical Statistics 

Nonthesis option: Applied Statistics: Statistical Theory and 
Applications 

• Research requirement: 

Thesis option: ST.'\T-797 Master's Thesis Seminar in 

Statistics (3-6) requiring a formal written thesis with an oral 

defense 

Nonthesis option: STAT-691 Internship (3) and STAT-798 

Statistical Research and Consulting ( 3 ) with required oral and 

written presentation of the research work 



All course work for the thesis or nonthesis option must be 
completed with grades of B or better. 
Course Requirements 

• STAT-515 Regression (3) 

• STAT-524 Data Analysis (3) 

• STAT-525 Statistical Software (3) 

• STAT-530 Mathematical Statistics I (3) 

• STAT-531 Mathematical Statistics II (3) 

• STAT-6 1 6 Generalized Linear Models (3) 

• STAT-691 Internship in Statistics (3) 

Thesis option 

• STAT-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (3-6) 

• Two additional graduate courses in mathematics or statistical 
theory 

Nonthesis option 

• STAT-5 1 Survey Sampling (3) 

• STAT-798 Statistical Research and Consulting ( 1 ) (taken at 
least three times) 

• Two additional graduate courses in statistical theory, 
methods, and applications, including approved related 
courses offered by other departments 

Graduate Certificate in Applied Statistics 

Admission to the Program 

Open to sUidents with a bachelor's degree from an accred- 
ited institution. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 15 credit hours of approved course work with grades of C or 
better 

Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Suidents must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 
Course Requirements 

• STAT-530 Mathematical Statistics 1 (3) 

• STAT-531 Mathematical Statistics II (3) 

• Three of the following: 

ST.^T-5 10 Theory of Sampling I (3) 

STAT-515 Regression (3) 

STAT-516 Design of Experiments (3) 

STAT-5 1 7 Special Topics in Statistical Methodology (3) 

or 

STAT-5 19 Nonparametric Statistics (3) 



150 College of Arts and Sciences 



Multi-Ethnic Studies 



Coordinator Keith D. Leonard, Department of Literature 
Faculty from other schools and departments of the university 
teach in the program. 

Multi-Ethnic studies is an interdisciplinary program that 
offers a broad course of study of ethnicity in the United States 
and the larger world. To meet the challenges and opportunities 
of diversity in an increasingly multicultiiral and multiethnic 
society, the program provides students with an understanding 
of the rich history of ethnic and racial diversity from multiple 
perspectives. The minor and undergraduate certificate help 
students prepare for an increasingly diversified workplace and 
a globalized economy by encouraging them to develop an 
awareness of and appreciation for their ethnic experiences as 
part of the greater human experience. 

Minor in Multi-Ethnic Studies 

• 18 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor and at least 9 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• IDIS-210 Contemporary Multi-Ethnic Voices (3) 

• One of the following: 
GOVT-23 1 Third World Politics (3) 
HIST-210 Ethnicity in America 4:2 (3) 
SOCY-210 Inequality: Class, Race, Ethnicity 4:2 (3) 

• 12 credit hours in three of the following five areas: African 
and African American, Asian and Asian American, Jewish, 
Latin American and Caribbean, and Middle-Eastern 
Courses should represent a mix of social sciences and the 
humanities. Topics courses, independent study, internship, 
cooperative education, and study abroad must be approved 
by the program coordinator. 



Undergraduate Certificate in Multi-Ethnic 
Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Open to undergraduate degree and nondegree students. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours of approved course work with at least 9 credit 
hours at the 300-level or above, with grades of C or better 

• Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fiilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 1 2 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• IDIS-2 1 Contemporary Multi-Ethnic Voices (3) 

• One of the following: 
GOVT-23 1 Third World Politics (3) 
HIST-2 10 Ethnicity in America 4:2 (3) 
SOCY-210 Inequality: Class. Race, Ethracity 4:2 (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours in three of the following five areas: African and 
African American, Asian and Asian American, Jewish, Latin 
American and Caribbean, and Middle-Eastern 

Courses should represent a mix of social sciences and the 
humanities. Topics courses, independent study, internship, 
cooperative education, and study abroad must be approved by 
the advisor 



North American Studies 



Economic and social integration has accelerated in North 
America, but policy coordination and awareness of an emerg- 
ing North America have not kept pace. The Center for North 
American Studies (CNAS) at American University aims to ed- 
ucate a new generation of students from all three coun- 
tries-Canada, Mexico, and the United States-to begin a North 
American journey comparable to that begun in Europe five de- 
cades ago. The course work examines the differences and 
shared characteristics of the three nations,' compares the North 
American experiment with Europe's; and challenges students 
and faculty to imagine a continental ftiture. 

An undergraduate minor and a graduate certificate are of- 
fered. These interdisciplinary programs are administered by 
the College of Arts and Sciences with the support of the School 



of International Service, School of Public Affairs, School of 
Communication, and the Kogod School of Business. Shidents 
pursue an experiential component, based on study abroad in 
Canada or Mexico and/or an internship relevant to North Amer- 
ica. Students also need to demonstrate some level of proficiency 
in Spanish or French. The Center for North American Studies 
hosts Senior Fellows who teach special courses, which can sat- 
isfy requirements with the program coordinator's approval. 

Minor in North American Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Admission to the minor requires a minimum grade point av- 
erage (GPA) of 2.00 and approval of the program coordinator. 



North American Studies 1 5 1 



Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Students take a core survey course and 1 5 additional credit 
hours in North American-related course work, including 
study abroad in Canada or Mexico and/or an approved 
intemship, with a minimum 2.5 GPA in courses for the minor 
overall and a 3.0 GPA in the core courses. 

• A minimum of two years of Spanish or French language 
courses at the post-secondary level with grades of B or better, 
or a level of communication competency equivalent to the 
entry level for third-year conversation and composition, as 
demonstrated by a placement score of 42 1 points in French or 
440 points in Spanish on the Computer Assisted Proficiency 
Exam (CAPE) administered by the Language Resource 
Center in the Department of Language and Foreign Studies 
(LPS). 

• Preparation of a significant research paper as part of one of 
the core courses or as a reflection on study abroad or 
approved intemship 

• Approved study abroad in Canada or Mexico or an intemship 
with a North American focus 

Course Requirements 

• SlS-3 1 8 Topics in North America Studies: 
North America; A Union, a Community, or Just 

Three Nations? (3) 
or 
SlS-503 North American Suinmer Institute: 

Discovering North America Seminar (3) 

• a minimum of two North American-related issues courses 
from the following, or other North American topics courses 
with the program coordinator's approval: 

ECON-358 Economics of the World Regions: 

North America (3) 
GOVT-338 North Amencan Politics (3) 
SIS-400 Senior Seminar in International Relations: 

Politics of Regional Integration (3) 

North American Social Movements (3) 
SIS-513 Computer Applications in International Relations 

Research (3) (focus on North America) 

• 9 additional credit hours including an approved intemship or 
courses taken at selected universities in Canada and Mexico, 
and from special courses taught by CNAS Senior Fellows and 
the following, with the program coordinator's approval: 
AMST-400 Interpreting American Culture (4) 
ECON-319 United States Economic History (3) 
FREN-433 French Topics: ' 

Civilisation, LitteraUire, et Cinema du Quebec (3) 
SPAN-356 Spanish Topics: 

Mexico-U.S. Border (3) 
SIS-3 1 8 Topics in North American Studies: 

Politics and Institutions of International Trade (3) 



The Foreign Policy of a Middle Power: The Case of 
Canada (3) 

Graduate Certificate in North American 
Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with approval of the program co- 
ordinator. 

Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours of approved courses with grades of C or better 
and with at least 9 credit hours at the 600-level 

Students take the core course and 1 5 additional credit hours in 
North American-related course work, including study abroad 
in Canada or Mexico and/or an approved intemship, with a 
minimurh 3.0 GPA in courses for the certificate overall and a 
3.3 GPA in the core courses. 

Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fiilfiUment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

• A minimum of two years of Spanish or French language 
courses at the post-secondary level with grades of B or better, 
or a level of communication competency equivalent to the 
entry level for third-year conversation and composition, as 
demonstrated by a placement score of 42 1 points in French or 
440 points in Spanish on the Computer Assisted Proficiency 
Exam (CAPE) administered by the Language Resource 
Center in the Department of Language and Foreign Studies 
(LFS). 

• Preparation of a significant research paper as part of one of 
the core courses or as a reflection on study abroad or 
approved intemship 

• Approved snidy abroad in Canada or Mexico or an intemship 
with a North American focus 

Course Requirements 

• SIS-61 8 Topics in North America Studies: 
North America: A Union, a Community, or Just 

Three Nations? (3) 
or 
SIS-503 North American Summer Institute: 

Discovering North America Seminar (3) 

• a minimum of two North American-related issues courses 
from the following, or ofrier North American topics courses 
with the program coordinator's approval: 



152 College of Arts and Sciences 



ECON-658 Economics of the World Regions: 

North America (3) 
GOVT-638 North American Politics (3) 
SIS-513 Computer Apphcations in International Relations 

Research (3) (focus on North America) 
SIS-676 Selected Topics in Cross-National Study. 

North American Social Movements 
9 additional credit hours including an approved internship or 
courses taken at selected universities in Canada and Mexico, 
and from special courses taught by CNAS Senior Fellows 
and the following with the program coordinator's approval: 



ECON-619 United States Economic History (3) 
FREN-633 French Topics: 

Civilisation, Litterature, et Cinema du Quebec (3) 
SPAN-656 Spanish Topics: 

Mexico-U.S. Border (3) 
SIS-618 Topics in North American Studies: 

Politics and InstiUitions of International Trade (3) 

The Foreign Policy of a Middle Power: The Case of 

Canada (3) 



Performing Arts: Music, Theatre, Dance, Audio 
Teciinology, and Arts Management 



Co-Chairs Daniel Eric Abraham, Caleen Sinnette Jennings 

Fiill-Time Faculty 

Professor Enieritus/a A.R. Mandel. V.E. Mason, 

N. Prevots,GC. Schuetze, E. Vrenios 

Professor C. Jennings. J. Sapieyevski 

Associate Professor Emeritus K. Baker, B. Baranovic 

Associate Professor D. Abraham, G Humphries 

Mardirosian 

Assistant Professor F. Benadon, J. Berard, C. Gabriel, 

M. George. A. Holland, A. Kang. K. Kippola, M. Medwin, 

C. Menninger. P. Oehlers, M. Wilkerson 

The Department of Perfoniiing Arts provides intensive 
professional training in each of its disciplines: music, theatre, 
musical theatre, dance, audio technology, and arts manage- 
ment. The programs otTer a unique blend of classroom work 
and perfomtance or professional experience. Each year a sea- 
son of plays, musicals, orchestra and choral concerts, and 
dance concerts augments classroom learning with actual stage 
experience. Similarly, the arts management program provides 
hands-on experience through field smdies and internships with 
local or national arts organizations. The department's mission 
is to provide an educational experience dedicated to embracing 
tradition and innovation in the arts. 

The B.S. in Audio Technology prepares students for ca- 
reers in the audio, entertainment, acoustics, computer, and 
electronics fields, while the B.A. in Audio Production concen- 
trates on audio and music production within the broader con- 
text of a liberal arts education. These programs focus on the art 
and science of audio and music technology, including sound 
synthesis and electronic music production, multitrack studio 
recording, analog and digital electronics, physics/acoustics. 
and digital audio workstations. Students can gain real-worid 
experience by interning at a professional recording studio, ra- 
dio or television station, theater, or other such facility. 

The Katzen Arts Center provides exceptional venues for 
each of the department's programs. It includes a 200-seat re- 
cital hall, a studio theatre seating up to 100, teaching studios 



and practice rooms, organ, piano, and percussion studios, 
classrooms designed for perfomiing arts, an arts management re- 
source center, and a library housing thousands of volumes of 
music scores, books, and recordings. 

Dedicated to advancing the department's educational vision 
through excellence in performance and design, the Harold and 
Sylvia Greenberg Theatre on Wisconsin Ave. is a venue for thea- 
tre, musical theatre, and dance performances. In addition to a 
300-seat theatre, the facility includes a scene shop, costume 
shop, and state-of-the-art equipment. 

The Visiting Artists and Artists-in-Residence programs pro- 
vide students with opportunities to meet and work with well 
known professionals in each of the disciplines. Visiting artists 
have included Colin Bills, Erick Hawkins, James Kronzer, Bruce 
Montgomery, Paul Morella, and Patrick Stewart. Musi- 
cians-in-Rcsidence have included Nancy Snider, Linda Allison. 
Terri L;izar, and Oman ICivTak. 

The dynamic interaction of performance experience, theoret- 
ical and historical understanding, and exposure to 
well-established professionals is designed to prepare students for 
a professional or teaching career in an excellent environment 
that numres the creative spirit. The Washington, D.C. area is the 
home of many prominent arts organizations, including the John 
F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Smithsonian Instim- 
tion, Washington Ballet, Wolf Trap Foundation for the Per- 
forming Arts, National Symphony, Washington National Opera, 
and the Washington Perfomiing Arts Society. In addition to 
study abroad options, Washington. D.C.'s rich international cul- 
ture provides sUidents with opportunities to enhance their cul- 
tural knowledge through interactions with international artists 
and perfonning arts groups. 
Teaching Certincation 

Smdents interested in teacher certification in theatre or music 
may take a 36-credit hour second major in secondary education 
or combine their degree with the M.A.T. degree with a concen- 
tration in secondary education. For information on admission 
and program requirements, see the School of Education, 
Teaching and Health teacher preparation programs. 



Performing Arts: Music, Theatre, Dance, Audio Technology, and Arts Management 153 



B.A. in Audio Production 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the program requires a grade point av- 
erage of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental approval. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 59 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Core Courses (32-37 credit hours) 

• ATEC-101 Fundamentalsof Audio Technology (3) 

• ATEC-102 Audio Technology Laboratory (1) 

• ATEC-301 Digital Audio Workstations I (3) 

• ATEC-3 1 1 Sound Studio Techniques I (3) 

• ATEC-321 Sound Synthesis 1 (3) 

• ATEC^Ol Digital Audio Workstations U (3) 

• ATEC-403 Production Mixing and Mastering (3) 

• ATEC-411 Sound Studio Techniques 11 (3) 

• ATEC-421 Sound Synthesis 11 (3) 

• ATEC-431 Smdio Management (3) 

• ATEC-441 Business of the Audio Industry (3) 

• ATEC-450 Audio Technology Capstone (1-6) 

Electives (12 credit hours) 

• 1 2 credit hours from the following or other courses with the 
approval of the department: 

ATEC-491 Internship (1-6) 
PHYS-305 Acoustics (3) 
PHYS-312 Electronics 1 (3) and 

PHYS-322 Electronics I Lab I (2) 
PHYS-3 1 3 Electronics II (3) and 

PHYS-323 Electronics 11 Lab (2) 
Area of Specialization (15 credit hours) 

• an additional 15 credit hours from an area of specialization, 
either communication or music: 

Communication 
COMM-100 Understanding Media 4: 1 (3) 
COMM-105 Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 
COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 
COMM-33 1 Fibn and Video Production I (3) 
COMM-350 Digital Imaging (3) 



COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 

COMM^34 Film and Video Production 11 (3) 

COMM-438 Production Practicum (1-3): 
Creative Sound Techniques 
Techniques and Aesthetics of Editing 
Final Cut Pro 
Avid Editing 
Web Development 
Introduction to Gaming 
Music 

PERF-124HaniionyI(3) 

PERF-125 Harmony n (3) 

PERF-227 Musicianship 1 (3) 

PERF-228 Musicianship II (3) 

PERF-320 History of Rock Music (3) 

PERF-32 1 Evolution of Jazz and Blues (3) 

PERF-322 Music History I (3) 

PERF-323 Music History II (3) 

PERF-324 Form and Analysis (3) 

PERF-325 Counterpoint (3) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rolhnent in the master's program. 



154 College of Arts and Sciences 



B.S. in Audio Technology 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the program requires a grade point av- 
erage of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and the approval of the depart- 
ment undergraduate advisor. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence from 
each of five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 61 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Core Courses (29-34 credit hours) 

• ATEC-101 Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) 

• ATEC- 1 02 Audio Technology Laboratory ( 1 ) 

• ATEC-301 Digital Audio Workstations 1(3) 

• ATEC-3 1 1 Sound Studio Techniques 1 (3) 

• ATEC-321 Sound Synthesis I (3) 

• ATEC-401 Digital Audio Workstations 11 (3) 

• ATEC-403 Production Mixing and Mastering (3) 

• ATEC-41 1 Sound Studio Techniques II (3) 

• ATEC-421 Sound Synthesis 11 (3) 

• ATEC-431 Studio Management (3) 

• ATEC-450 Audio Teclinology Capstone ( 1-6) 

Core Science Courses (20-21 credit hours) 

• PFTYS-lOO Physics for the Modem World 5:1 (4) and 

PHYS-200 Physics for the New Millennium 5:2 (3) 
or 
PHYS-105 College Physics 1 5:1 (4) and 

PHYS-205 College Physics 11 5:2 (4) 
or 
PHYS-1 10 University Physics I 5: 1 (4) and 

PHYS-2 10 University Physics II 5:2 (4) 

• PHYS-305 Acoustics (3) 

• PHYS-3 12 Electronics I (3) ant/ 
PHYS-322 Electronics 1 Lab 1 (2) 

• PHYS-313 Electronics II (3) and 
PHYS-323 Electronics 11 Lab (2) 

Electives (6 credit hours) 

• 6 credit hours from the following or other courses with the 
approval of the department: 

ATEC-441 Business of the Audio Industry (3) 



ATEC-491 Internship (1-6) 
PHYS-305 Acoustics (3) 
COMM-105 Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 
COMM-438 Production Practicum (3): 

Creative Sound Techniques 
PERF-120 Music Fundamentals (3) 
PERF-124 Harmony 1(3) 
PERF-125 Harmony II (3) 
PERP-227 Musicianship I (3) 
PERF-228 Musicianship II (3) 
Area of Specialization (15 credit hours) 

• an additional 1 5 credit hours from an area of specialization, 

either computer science or physics: 
Computer Science 

CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

CSC-281 Introduction to Computer Science 11 (3) 

CSC-330 Organization of Computer Systems (4) 

CSC-520 Algorithms and Data Structures (3) 

CSC-521 Design and Organization of Programming 
Languages (3) 

CSC-565 Operating Systems (3) 
Physics 

PHYS-365 Waves and Optics (3) 

PHYS-370 Modem Physics (3) 

PHYS-430 Classical Mechanics (3) 

PHYS-440 Experimental Physics (3) 

PHYS-450 Electricity and Magnetism (3) 

PHYS-470 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the department. 
Each deparmient has three levels of University Honors require- 
ments: Level 1 Options ( 1 00-200-level Honors classes); Level 11 
Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and Level 111 Op- 
tions (Honors Senior Capstone). The department Honors coordi- 
nator advises students in the University Honors Program 
regarding departmental options. For more information, go to 
www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers suidents the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 



Performing Arts: Music, Theatre, Dance, Audio Technology, and Arts Management 155 



lor's degree is eamed and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the rwo programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

B.A. in Music 

American University is an accredited institutional member 
of the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM). 
Admission to the Program 

Fomial admission to the music major requires demonstrated 
ability through an audition and interview arranged with the de- 
partment, preferably prior to beginning university studies. 
However, a student may enter as an intended major and audi- 
tion/interview during the first year. Students will be accepted 
based on programmatic approval and written declaration of ma- 
jor 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours maybe taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 53 credit hours with grades of C or better 

Applied Music Lesson requirement: all students must 
successfully complete a minimum of four semesters of 
MUS- 122 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study on a principal 
instrument or voice; music majors must enroll for a one-hour 
lesson each week and attend the weekly music performance 
lab(MUS-OOl). 

Jury examinations must be undertaken at the end of each 
semester except when the student is presenting a recital in 
MUS-334 or MUS-434. 

Performance Ensemble requirements: All students must 
successfiilly complete a minimum of four semesters of 
approved performance ensembles. Music majors must enroll 
in a performance ensemble in all semesters in which they are 
enrolled in applied music lessons. 
Music Prerequisite Courses 

These courses are waived for students with equivalent mu- 
sic experience: 

• PERF-1 1 1 Class Piano Level 1(1) 

• PERF-1 12 Class Piano Level 11(1) 

• PERF-120 Music Fundamentals (3) with a grade of B or 
better 

Course Requirements 

• PERF-l24Hamiony 1(3) 



• PERF-125 Harmony 11(3) 

• PERF-227 Musicianship 1 (3) 

• PERF-228 Musicianship II (3) 

• PERF-322 Music History 1: From Antiquity to 1750 (3) 

• PERF-323 Music History II: 1 750 to Present (3) 

• PERF-324 Form and Analysis (3) 

• PERF-325 Counterpoint (3) 

• PERF-445 Senior Capstone: Music (3) 

• A minimum of 8 credit hours in 

MUS- 122 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study (2) 

• A minimum of 4 credit hours in performance ensembles: 
PERF-1 42/542 University Chorus ( 1 ) 

PERF-1 43/543 University Singers (2) 
PERF- 1 44/544 University Orchestra ( I ) 
PERF-1 45/545 Chamber Ensembles (1) 
PERF- 1 46/546 Jazz Ensemble (1) 
PERF- 1 6 1 /56 1 Gospel Choir ( 1 ) 
Area of Concentration 

• A minimimi of 14 credit hours in an area of concentration. 
Students may select from the following or design an 
individual area of concentration with approval of their 
academic advisor and the director of music. Examples of 
individually designed areas include music production, 
international arts management, and music criticism. 

Arts Management (15 credit hours) 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• ACCT-241 Principles of Managerial Accounting (3) 
or 

ECON-200 Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

• ECON-IOOMacroeconomics4:l (3) 

• MKTG-300 Principles of Management (3) 

• PERF-570 Survey of Arts Management (3) 

Composition (16 credit hours) 

• MUS- 122 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study: 
Composition (2) three semesters for a total of 6 credit hours 

• MUS-434 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study: 

Senior Recital (4) 

• PERF-326 Orchestration (3) 

• PERF-435 Topics in Music (3) (approved topic) 

Jazz Studies (16 credit hours) 

• MUS- 1 22 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study (2) three 
additional semesters for a total of 6 credit hours 

• MUS-434 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study: 

Senior Recital (4) 

• PERF-226 Improvisation (3) 

• PERF-321 The Evolution of Jazz and Blues (3) 

Performance (16 credit hours) 
Vocal Performance 



156 College of Arts and Sciences 



• MUS-122 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study (2) three 
additional semesters for a total of 6 credit hours 

• MUS-434 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study: 

Senior Recital (4) 

• PERF-251 Fundamentals of Acting I (3) 

• PERF-356 Diction for Singers (3) 

German, Italian, or French language courses are 
recommended 

Instrumental Performance 

• \fUS-122 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study (2) three 
additional semesters for a total of 6 credit hours 

• N/rUS-434 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study: 

Senior Recital (4) 

• PERF-435 Topics in Music (3) (approved topic) 

• PERF-550 Chamber Ensembles (1) three semesters for a 
total of 3 credit hours 

History and Literature or Anthropology of Music 
(15 credit hours) 

• HlST-100 Historians and the Living Past 2: 1 (3) 

• HIST-xxx or ANTH-xxx approved course (3) 

• PERF-435 Topics in Music (3) (approved topic) (two 
courses for a total of 6 credit hours) 

• PERF-491 Performing .^rts: Intemship (1^) 
or 

PERF^35 Topics in Music (3) (approved topic) 

• Senior thesis written project submitted for PERF-M5 Senior 
Capstone: Music 

Theory (15 credit hours) 

• PERF-326 Orchestration (3) 

• PERF-435 Topics in Music (3) (approved topic) (three 
courses for a total of 9 credit hours) 

• PERF-585 Creative Theories and Criticism in Performing 

Arts (3) 

• Senior thesis written project submitted for PERF-445 Senior 
Capstone: Music 

Universitj' Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 1 2 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 ad\ anced-le\ el Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 1 00-200-level Honors classes); 
Level 11 Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to vvvvvv.amencan.edu'academic.depts/honors/ . 



Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate sUident completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the Uvo programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

B.A. in Performing Arts: Musical Theatre 

Admission to the Program 

Fomial admission to the major requires demonstrated talent 
through an audition arranged with the department, preferably 
prior to beginning university studies. However, a student may 
enter as an intended major and audition during the first year Stu- 
dents will be accepted based on programmatic approval and 
written declaration of major. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each of 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 48 credit hours with grades of C or better 

Students who wish to study abroad must receive prior approval 
from their advisor in order to ensure that appropriate courses 
will transfer and that scholarships and financial aid will apply. 

• Participation in a minimum of four department productions 
and management (as stage manager or assistant stage 
manager) of one of these productions before graduation 

Course Requirements 
Core (21 credit hours) 

• PERF-251 Fundamentals ofActing I (3) 

• PERF-260 Production I: Stagecraft (3) 

• PERF-26I Production II: Introduction to Design (3) 

• PERF-265 Theatre Practicum ( 1 ) (taken twice for a total of 2 
credit hours) 



Performing Arts: Music, Theatre, Dance, Audio Technology, and Arts Management 1 57 



• PERF-365 Theatre History I: From the Greeics to the 

Seventeenth Century (3) 

• PERF-366 Theatre History II: from Baroque to the End of 

the Nineteenth Century (3) 

• PERF-440 Stage Management ( 1 ) 

• PERF-445 Senior Capstone: Musical Theatre (3) 

Musical Theatre (27 credit hours) 

• PERF-227 Musicianship I (3) 

• PERF-228 Musicianship II (3) 

• PERP-252 Fundamentals ofActing II (3) 

• PERF-340 From Scene into Song (3) 

• PERF-346 Survey of Music Theatre (3) 

• PERF-450 Rotating Topics in Theatre: 
Dance Styles for Music Theatre (3) 

• PERF-556 Acting V: Audition Techniques (3) 

• 3 credit hours of dance technique courses 

• 3 credit hours of applied music (MUS-xxx): voice 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more infonna- 
tion, go to wwAv.american.edu/academic.depts/lionors' . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American Uni\ ersity offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will detemiine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's .students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate le\ el after the bache- 
lor's degree is eamed and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements withm three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the ma.stcr's program. 

B.A. in Performing Arts: Theatre 

.\dmission to the Program 

Fonnal admission to the major requires demonstrated talent 
through an audition portfolio re% iew arranged with the depart- 



ment, preferably prior to beginning university studies. How- 
e\ er. a student may enter as an intended major and have an au- 
dition or portfolio review during the first year. Students will be 
accepted based on programmatic approval and written declara- 
tion of major 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-le\ el course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five cumcular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Tracks 

Performance, Design/Production, Arts Management, or Theatre 

Arts 

Major Requirements 

• 48 credit hours with grades of C or better 

Students who wish to study abroad must receive prior 
approval from their advisor in order to ensure that appropriate 
courses v\ ill transfer and that scholarships and financial aid 
will apply. 

• Participation in a minimum of four department productions in 
either a performance or technical capacity. One of these must 
be done as stage manager or assistant stage manager. 

Course Requirements 
Core (21 credit hours) 

• PERF-251 Fundamentals ofActing I (3) 

• PERF-260 Production I: Stagecraft (3) 

• PERF-261 Production II: Introduction to Design (3) 

• PERF-265 Theatre Practicum ( 1 ) (taken Us ice for a total of 
2 credit hours) 

• PERF-365 Theatre History I: From the Greeks to the 

Seventeenth Century (3) 

• PERF-366 Theatre History II: from Baroque to the End of 

the Nineteenth Centiuy (3) 

• PERF-440 Stage Management (1) 

• PERF-445 Senior Capstone: Theatre (3) 

• One of the following tracks: 

Performance (27 credit hours) 
Audition required 

• PERF-252 Fundamentals ofActing II (3) 

• PERF-350 Fundamentals ofActing III (3) 

• PERF-355 Speech and Voice (3) 

• PERF-450 Rotating Topics in Theatre (3) (taken two times 
for a total of 6 credit hours) 



158 College of Arts and Sciences 



PERF-490 Independent Smdy Project (3) (may be 
substimted for one PERF^SO topic) 

PERF-506 The Moving Body (3) 
PERF-552 Directing Techniques (3) 
PERF-556 Acting V: Audition Techniques (3) 
PERF-557 Playwriting (3) 
Design/Production (27 credit hours) 
ARTH-105 Art: The Historical Experience 1:1 (3) 
ARTS-100 Art: The SUidio Experience 1:1 (3) 
PERF-362 Lighting Design (3) 
PERF-364 Basics of Scene and Costume Design (3) 
PERF-450 Rotating Topics in Theatre (3) 
PERF-490 Independent Study Project (3) 
or 
PERF-491 Perfonning Arts: Internship (3) 

PERF-552 Directing Techniques (3) 
PERF-557 Playwriting (3) 

additional area of specialty course approved by advisor (3) 
Arts Management (27 credit hours) 
ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 
ECON-100 Macroeconomics 4:1 (3) 

PERF-362 Lighting Design (3) 

or 

PERF-364 Basics of Scene and Costume Design (3) 

PERF-450 Rotating Topics in Theatre (3) or other area of 

specialty course approved by advisor 

PERF-490 hidependent Study Project (3) 

or 

PERF^91 Performing Arts: Internship (3) 

PERF-552 Directing Techniques (3) 

PERF-557 Playwriting (3) 

PERF-570 Survey of Arts Management (3) 

PERF-585 Creative Theories and Criticism of 

Performing Arts (3) 
Theatre Arts (27 credit hours) 
PERF-252 Fundamentals of Acting II (3) 

PERF-355 Speech and Voice (3) 
or 

PERF-506 The Moving Body (3) 
PERF-362 Lighting Design (3) 
or 

PERF-364 Basics of Scene and Costume Design (3) 
PERF-552 Directing Techniques (3) 
PERF-557 Playwriting (3) 
PERF-585 Creative Theories and Criticism of 
Performing Arts (3) 



• 9 credit hours in additional area of specialty courses approved 
by advisor 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the department. 
Each department has three levels of University Honors require- 
ments: Level 1 Options (100-200-level Honors classes); Level II 
Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and Level III Op- 
tions (Honors Senior Capstone). The department Honors coordi- 
nator advises students in the University Honors Program 
regarding departmental options. For more information, go to 
www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers smdents the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will determine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Audio Technology 

• 22 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ATEC-101 Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) 

• ATEC-102 Audio Technology Laboratory ( 1 ) 

• ATEC-301 Digital Audio Workstations 1 (3) 

• ATEC-3 1 1 Sound Smdio Techniques I (3) 

• ATEC-401 Digital Audio Workstations II (3) 

• ATEC-41 1 Sound Studio Techniques 11 (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following 
ATEC-321 Sound Synthesis I (3) 
ATEC-403 Production Mixing and Mastering (3) 
ATEC-421 Sound Synthesis II (3) 
ATEC-441 Business of the Audio Industry (3) 
ATEC^50 Audio Technology Capstone ( 1-6) 

Minor in Dance 

• 24 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 



Performing Arts: Music, Theatre, Dance, Audio Technology, and Arts Management 1 59 



Students intending to pursue the dance minor must be 
assigned a departmental advisor Students must achieve some 
proficiency in dance performance. Required levels of 
proficiency are decided individually in conference with the 
director of the dance program, and take into account the 
student's interests, background, and abilities in dance. 
Course Requirements 

• PERF-305 History and Philosophy of Dance 1: 

15th-19th Centuries (3) or 
PERF-306 History and Philosophy of Dance II: 
20th Century (3) 

• PERF-41 1 Composition of Dance 1 (3) or 
PERF-4 12 Composition of Dance II (3) 

• PERF-506 The Moving Body (3) 

• PERF-507 Principles of Movement (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours in dance electives 

Minor in Music 

• 2 1 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 1 2 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 
Performance 

• PERF-124 Harmony 1(3) and PERF-125 Harmony n (3) 
or 

PERF-227 Musicianship I (3) and 
PERF-228 Musicianship II (3) 

• PERF-322 History of Music I: fiom Antiquity to 1700 (3) 
or 

PERF-323 History of Music U: from 1700 to the Present (3) 

• Three semesters of MUS-122 Private Study (2) for a 
total of 6 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours in music electives at the 300 level or above 

Theory/History 

• PERF-124 Harmony I (3) and PERF-125 Harmony II (3) 
or 

PERF-227 Musicianship I (3) and 
PERF-228 Musicianship II (3) 

• PERF-322 History of Music I: from Antiquity to 1700 (3) 
or 

PERF-323 History of Music D: from 1 700 to the Present (3) 

• 12 credit hours of music electives at the 300 level or above 

Minor in Theatre 

• 22 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Students intending to pursue the theatre minor must be 
assigned a departmental advisor. 
Course Requirements 

• PERF-25 1 Fundamentals of Acting I (3) 

• PERF-260 Production I: Stagecraft (3) 



• PERF-261 Production II: Introduction to Design (3) 

• PERF-265 Theatre Practicum ( 1 ) 

• PERF-365 Theatre History 1: From the Greeks to the 

Seventeenth Century (3) 

• PERF-366 Theatre History II: from Baroque to the End of 

the Nineteenth CenUiry (3) 

• One of the following: 

PERF-450 Rotating Topics in Theatre (3) 
PERF-552 Directing Techniques (3) 
PERF-557 Playwriting (3) 

• One of the following: 

PERF-350 Fundamentals of Acting in (3) 

PERF-362 Lighting Design (3) 

PERF-364 Basics of Scene and Costume Design (3) 

M.A. in Performing Arts: Arts 
Management 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must have completed at 
least nine undergraduate courses in theatre, dance, music, or vi- 
sual arts, one-third of which must be advanced work or its 
equivalent. Equivalent training is understood to be four or more 
years' experience in a professional company or organization. 
Students applying to the program with this background will be 
asked for an interview. Two letters of recommendation and 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are required. Pro- 
visional admission may be granted and is removed at the com- 
pletion of 12 credit hours of course work with a minimum grade 
point average of 3.00. 
Degree Requirements 

• 45 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Advancement to candidacy on completing 12 to 18 credit 
hours with a grade point average of 3.00 or higher, removing 
any undergraduate deficiencies, and with the written 
recommendation of the student's faculty advisor 

• A four-hour comprehensive examination covering three 
areas: arts management, and two areas of specialization 

• 6 credit hours from one of the following with grades of B or 
better: 

Non-thesis option: 

PERF-702 Masters Portfolio Seminar 
PERF-793 Directed Research in the Arts 
TTiesis option: PERF-797 Master's Thesis Seminar 
Course Requirements 

• PERF-570 Survey of Arts Management (3) 

• PERF-571 Marketing in the Arts (3) 

• PERF-585 Creative Tlieories and Criticism in 

Performing Arts (3) 

• PERF-673 Fund Raising Management for the Arts (3) 

• PERF-674 Financial Management in the Arts (3) 



160 College of Arts and Sciences 



• PERF-691 Performing Arts: Internship (1-6) 
or 

PERF-692 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3-6) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
PERF-702 Masters Portfolio Seminar (1-6) 
PERF-793 Directed Research in the Arts (1-6) 
PERF-797 Master's Thesis Seminar ( I -6) 

• 6 credit hours in approved arts-related nonmanagerial 
courses 

• 12 credit hours in approved elective courses including 
business administration, communication, and public 
administration 

Graduate Certificate in Arts 
Management 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution. Applicants must have com- 
pleted nine or more courses in theatre, dance, music, or visual 
arts, one third of which should be advanced work or equivalent 
training. Equivalent training is four or more years' experience 
in a professional organization. Students are encouraged to 
schedule a personal interview with the program director 

Philosophy and Religion 



Certiflcate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the flilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• PERF-570 Survey of Arts Management (3) 

• PERF-571 Marketing in the Arts (3) 

• PERF-672 Rotating Topics in Arts Management (3) (two 
courses for a total of 6 credit hours) 

• PERF-673 Fund-Raising Management for the Arts (3) 
or 

PERF-585 Creative Theories and Criticism in Perfonning 
Arts (3) 



Cliair Ellen Feder 

Full-Time Faculty 

William Fraser McDowell Professor J.H. Reiman 

Professor Emeritus HA. Durfee, CD. Hardwick, 

C.S.J. White 

Professor G Greenberg 

Associate Professor Emeritus D.F.T Rodier, PH. Scribner 

Associate Professor E. Feder, A. Oliver, J. Park, 

A. Tschcmplik 

Assistant Professor E. Berry, F Erfani, K. Leighton, 

S. Pathak, L. Weirs 



Philosophy explores the nature of the world, the basis of 
human values, and the foundations of reason. Philosophy also 
offers the challenge of interpreting the work of thinkers who 
have created our intellectual traditions. 

The study of philosophy provides excellent preparation for 
law, medicine, social work, the ministry, and other profes- 
sional careers. Many positions in science and industry require 
the kinds of analytical skills gained through the study of phi- 
losophy. Philosophy teaches precision in reasoning and clarity 
in expression — assets in any field. Alumni of the B.A. and 
M.A. programs have pursued graduate work in philosophy and 
related areas such as political science, psychology, history, lit- 
erature, and other professional programs. 



The study of Western and Eastern religious traditions intro- 
duces students to a major influence on all civilizations. Journal- 
ists, diplomats, and government specialists benefit from a 
serious consideration of the inner workings of the religious ethos 
of civilizations. Daily events remind us that there is no more mo- 
tivating factor in the cultures of nations than ardently held reli- 
gious belief A thorough understanding of the modem world 
requires familiarity with its religious heritage. American Univer- 
sity's Washington, D.C. setting is advantageous for the study of 
religion, with national offices and centers for many religions in 
the metropolitan area. The Consortium of Universities of the 
Washington Metropolitan Area also offers a variety of courses in 
philosophy and religion that are available to American Univer- 
sity students. 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion annually 
awards the Col. Harold and Ruth Pearson Prize in Philosophy to 
one or more majors who have demonstrated excellence in the 
study of philosophy. 

B.A. in Philosophy 

Admission to the Program 

Admission is through a formal declaration of major The de- 
partment counsels freshmen and new transfer students. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 



Philosophy and Religion 1 6 1 



• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• 30 credit hours in philosophy and religion, including 9 credit 
hours in philosophy at the 300 level or above, and up to 9 
credit hours in religion 

• 9 credit hours in a single department outside of philosophy 
and religion, including 6 credit hours at the 300 level or above 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 1 2 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options ( 1 00-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined B.A. and M.A. in Philosophy 

Ainerican University otfers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will detennine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at 
least 18 in-rcsidence credit hours at the graduate level after the 
bachelor's degree is earned and maintain contmuous, sequential 
enrollment in the two programs. 

This program enables qualified students to earn, in a contin- 
uous plan of study, both the B.A. and the M.A. in Philosophy. 
Requirements 

• Undergraduate philosophy majors should apply for 
admission to the B.A.'M.A. program by the end of the junior 
year. Admission is open to undergraduates with a minimum 
grade point average of 3.00 overall and in philosophy 
courses. Applications must be accompanied by two letters of 
recommendation, a statement of purpose, and an academic 
writing sample. Students should discuss their interest in the 



program with members of the faculty before submitting a 
formal application. 

• All requirements for the B.A. in Philosophy 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work to satisfy the 
requirements for both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in Philosophy, including a 
minimum of 24 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

B.A. in Religious Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Admission is through a formal declaration of major. The de- 
partment counsels freshmen and new transfer students. 

University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39 credit hours with grades of C or better, with a minimum of 
24 credit hours taken in the Department of Philosophy and 
Religion 

Course Requirements 

• RELG-105 Religious Heritage of the West 2:1 (3) 

• RELG-185 Forms of the Sacred: Religions of the 

East 3: 1(3) 

• RELG-210 Non-Westem Religious Traditions 3:2 (3) 
or 

RELG-220 Religious Thought 2:2 (3) 

• RELG-230 Methods of Studying Religions (3) 

• RELG-391 Internship (3) 

• 9 credit hours in religion courses from the following: 
RELG-370Islam(3) 

RELG-371 Topics in Jewish Religion (3) 
RELG-372 Religion in America (3) 
RELG-373 Hinduism (3) 
RELG-375 Religion and Violence (3) 
RELG-386 Topics in Religious Discussion (3) 

• 6 credit hours in philosophy courses from the following: 
PHIL-220 Moral Philosophy 2:2 (3) 



162 College of Arts and Sciences 



PHIL-235 Theories of Democracy and 

Human Rights 2:2 (3) 

PHIL-300 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3) 

PHIL-318 Chinese Philosophy (3) 

PHIL-3 19 Buddhist Philosophy (3) 

PHIL-520 Seminar on Ethical Theory (3) 

PHIL-525 Seminar on Modem Moral Problems (3) 
• 9 credit hours from the following: 

ANTH-430 Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion (3) 

ANTH-431 Taboos 

HlST-239 Topics in European History (3) (approved 
topics) 

HlST-245 Modem Jewish Civilization (3) 

HIST-332 Contemporary Historical Studies (3) (approved 
topics) 

HlST-344 Topics in Jewish History (3) (approved topics) 

JWST-320 Topics in Jewish Culture (3) 

PSYC-335 Psychology of Religion (3) 

SlS-514 Spirihiality and Global Politics (3) 

SOCY-3 1 5 Major Social Theorists (3) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 1 2 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 1 2 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 1 00-200-level Honors classes); 
Level 11 Options (300-lcvcl and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the oppormnity to 
earn both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its ac- 
celerated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate stu- 
dents may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required 
for the graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements 
for both degree programs. The department that oversees the 
graduate program the student enters will determine if the 
courses the undergraduate student completes will satisfy mas- 
ter's degree requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the 
master's degree requirements within three years from the date 
of first enrollment in the master's program. 



Minor in Philosophy 



• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor, and at least 9 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 
PHlL-105 Western Philosophy 2:1 (3) 
PHlL-300 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3) 
PHIL-301 Modem Philosophy from Bacon to Hegel (3) 

• 1 5 credit hours in philosophy (or 1 2 credit hours in philosophy 
and 3 credit hours in religion) 



Minor in Religion 



• 1 8 credit hours w ith grades of C or better with at least 1 2 
credit hours unique to the minor, and at least 9 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
RELG-105 Religious Heritage of the West 2:1 (3) 
RELG-185 Forms of the Sacred: Religions of the 

East 3: 1 (3) 
RELG-210 Non-Western Religious Traditions 3:2 (3) 
RELG-220 Religious Thought 2:2 (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours in religion courses, or 9 credit hours in religion 
and 3 credit hours in philosophy 



M.A. in Philosophy 



Admission to the Program 

Applicants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study. Admission is based on academic record, two 
letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose, and an aca- 
demic writing sample. The Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) General is required. 
Traclis 

History of Philosophy or Philosophy and Social Policy 
Degree Requirements 

• 30-33 credit hours of approved graduate work 

History of Philosophy Track 

• Tool of research: demonstrated proficiency in a foreign 
language, consult the department for more information 

• Comprehensive examination requirement: submission of 
three qualifying papers 

• Thesis and oral defense of thesis 

Philosophy and Social Policy Track 

• 3 credit internship in an appropriate setting followed by a 
substantial paper analyzing the ethical and social issues arising 
from the experience. Students employed full-time may request 
pemiission to receive credit for prior experience, but the paper 
is still required. 

• Comprehensive examination requirement: submission of 
three qualifying papers 



Philosophy and Rehgion 1 63 



Course Requirements 

History of Philosophy Tracii (30 credit hours) 

• 24 credit hours of approved graduate course worlc 

• PHIL-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (6) 

Philosophy and Social Policy Track (33 credit hours) 

• Two courses from the following: 
PHlL-520 Seminar on Ethical Theory (3) 
PHlL-525 Seminar on Modem Moral Problems (3) 

an approved course in either ethics or applied ethics (3) 

• Two courses from the following: 
PHIL-602 Nineteenth Century Philosophy (3) 
PHIL-603 Twentieth Century Philosophy (3) 

an approved course in the history of philosophy (3) 

• PHIL-691 Internship in Philosophy (3) 

• 6 credit hours in applied philosophy, with departmental 
approval 

• 6 credit hours in philosophy or religion, with departmental 
approval 

• 6 credit hours in social science or social policy from fields 
such as economics, sociology, anthropology, government, 
public administration, and justice, with departmental 
approval 

M.A. in Ethics, Peace, and Global Affairs 

Admission to the Program 

The M.A. in Ethics, Peace, and Global Affairs is an interdis- 
ciplinary program administered jointly by the School of Inter- 
national Service (SIS) and the Department of Philosophy and 
Religion in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS). 

Students may apply to either the Department of Philosophy 
and Religion or the School of Intemational Service. The Gradu- 
ate Record Examination (GRE) is required. Students applying 
to SIS must apply by January 15 for fall and October 1 for 
spring to be considered for merit-based aid. 
Degree Requirements 

• 39 credit hours of approved graduate work including 6 credit 
hours of research course work with grades of B or better 

• Comprehensive examination requirement 
CAS: submission of three qualifying papers 

Course Requirements 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• PHIL-525 Seminar on Modem Moral Problems (3) 

• PHlL-693 Global Ethics (3) 

• SIS-607 Peace Paradigms (3) 

• SIS-6 14 Ethics in Intemational Affairs (3) 

Foundation (6 credit hours) 

• PHIL-520 Seminar on Ethical Theory (3) 

• SlS-622 Human Rights (3) 

Research Methodology (3 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in Intemational Affairs (3) 



qualitative research seminar 
Research and Writing (6 credit hours) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: the thesis or substantial 
research paper and internship must relate clearly to the 
student's concentration and be supervised by faculty teaching 
related courses: 

PHlL-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (1-6) 

or 

PHIL-691 Internship in Philosophy 0)0)1(1 

PHIL-702 Graduate Seminar in Philosophy 

or 

SIS-691 Internship in Intemational Affairs (3) and 

SIS-795 Master's Research Requirement (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours in one of the following areas of concentration: 
Peace and Conflict Resolution 

• SIS-609 Conflict Analysis and Resolution: Theory and 

Practice (3) 

• Three courses from the following: 

PHIL-613 Studies in Asian Philosophy (3) (approved topic) 
PHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-515 Islamic Peace Paradigms (3) 
SIS-5 1 6 Peacebuilding in Divided Societies (3) 
SIS-5 1 7 Gender, Human Rights, and Conflict (3) 
SIS-540 Conflict and Development (3) 
SIS-606 Culture and Peace and Conflict Resolution: 

Alternatives to Violence (3) 
SIS-6 1 1 Intemational Negotiation (3) 
SIS-613 Reconciliation and Justice (3) 
SIS-6 1 9 Special Studies in Intemational Politics: 

Human Rights and Conflict (3) 
Human Rights and Social Justice 

• Four courses from the following: 
PHIL-616 Feminist Philosophy (3) 
PHIL-617 Race and Philosophy (3) 

PHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-613 Reconciliation and Justice (3) 
SIS-5 1 7 Gender, Human Rights, and Conflict (3) 
SIS-6 19 Special Studies in Intemational Politics: 

Human Rights and Conflict (3) 
SIS-62 1 Intemational Law and the Legal Order (3) 
Global Environmental Justice 

• SIS-660 Environment and Politics (3) 

• Three courses from the following: 

PHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-6 1 9 Special Studies in Intemational Politics: 

Global Environmental Politics and Policy (3) 
SIS-649 Environment and Development (3) 
SIS-663 Washington Workshop; Advanced Studies and 

Research in Environmental Policy (3) 



164 College of Arts and Sciences 



Ethics of Development 

• SIS-637 International Development (3) 

• Three courses from the following: 

PHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-540 Conflict and Development (3) 
SIS-636 Micropolitics of Development (3) 
SIS-647 Governance, Democracy, and Development (3) 
SIS-648 Women and Development (3) 
SIS-649 Environment and Development (3) 
SIS-650 Global Economy and Sustainable 

Development (3) 
International Economic Justice 

• SIS-616 International Economics (3) (prerequisite: 

ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory) 

• Three courses from the following: 

PHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 
topic) 



SIS-504 Multinational Corporations (3) 
SIS-587 Globalization: Power, Production, and Culture (3) 
SIS-650 Global Economy and Sustainable Development (3) 
SIS-665 International Trade and Investment Relations (3) 
SIS-666 International Monetary and Financial Relations (3) 
SIS-673 Comparative Political Economy (3) 

Global Governance and International Organizations 

SIS-621 Intemational Law and the Legal Order (3) 

SIS-625 Intemational Organizations (3) 

Two courses from the following: 

PHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-587 Globalization: Power, Production, and Culture (3) 
SIS-605 Theory of Cooperative Global Politics (3) 
SIS-647 Governance, Democracy, and Development (3) 
SlS-672 Theories of Comparative and Intemational 

Studies (3) 



Physics 



Chair U. J. Sofia 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus R. Berendzen, R.B. Kay, H.R. Reiss, 

R.A. Segnan, R.V. Waterhouse, J.A. Wliite 

Professor U. J. Sofia 

Associate Professor N. Harshman, T. Larkin 

Assistant Professor P. Johnson, J. Uscinski 

The B.S. in Physics, a minor in physics, and a minor and 
undergraduate certificate in applied physics are offered. 
Courses focus on the study of physical phenomena and proper- 
ties of the universe: gravitation, electricity and magnetism, 
atomic and nuclear stnicture, ftjndamental particles, and the 
properties of matter The department's faculty is active in re- 
search in multiple subfields of physics including atomic optics, 
condensed matter, particle physics, physics education, and 
quantum information. 

In our high-technology society, people with undergraduate 
physics backgrounds are employed in research labs and engi- 
neering fields, work in consulting companies, or pursue gradu- 
ate studies. Physics graduates are in diverse fields such as 
astronomy, medicine, engineering, architecture, acoustics, sci- 
ence education, science policy, as well as physics. 

Educational facilities include laboratories equipped wath 
modem technology and multiple teaching spaces tailored to 
foster interactive learning. Although not a formal requirement, 
most physics majors participate in undergraduate research ex- 
periences through internships and independent study. 



B.S. in Physics 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a grade point average 
of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental approval. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or die equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each of 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Tracks 

Chemical Physics, Computational Physics, or Traditional 
Physics 
Major Requirements 

• 57 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Core (45 credit hours) 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 

• MATH-3 13 Calculus m (4) 

• MATH-32 1 Differential Equations (3) 

• PHYS-1 10 University Physics I 5:1 (4) 



Physics 165 



• PHYS-210 University Physics II 5:2 (4) 

(PHYS- 11 and PHYS-2 1 may be waived for students with 
exceptional high school preparation) 

• PHYS-365 Waves and Optics (3 ) 

• PHYS-370 Modem Physics (3) 

• PHYS-430 Classical Mechanics (3) 

• PHYS-440 Experimental Physics (3) 

• PHYS-450 Electricity and Magnetism (3) 

• PHYS-470 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3) 

Tracks (12 credit Hours) 
Chemical Physics 
Prerequisite: CHEM-210 General Chemistry II 5:2 (4) 

• 12 credit hours from the following: 
CHEM-3 10 Organic Chemistry I (3) 
CHEM-3 1 2 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory ( I ) 
CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry II (3) 
CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory ( 1 ) 
CHEM-350 Quantitative Analysis (3) 
CHEM-35 1 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (2) 
CHEM-4 10 Biophysical Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-41 1 Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory ( 1 ) 
CHEM-460 Inslmmcnlal Analysis (3) 
CHEM-461 Instnimcntal Analysis Laboratory (2) 

Computational Physics 

• 12 credit hours from the following: 

CSC-281 Introduction to Coinpulcr Science II (3) 
CSC-330 Organization of Computer Systems (4) 
CSC-432 Introduction to Simulation and Modeling (3) 
CSC-520 Algorithms and Data Structures (3) 
CSC-543 Objeei-Oriented Analysis and Design (3) 
Traditional Physics 

• 12 credit hours from the following: 
MATH-310 Linear Algebra (3) 
MATH-550 Complex Analysis (3) 
MATH-551 Partial Differential Equations (3) 
PHYS-220 Astronomy 5:2 (3) 

PHYS-230 Changing Views of the Universe 5:2 (3) 

PHYS-305 Acoustics (3) 

PHYS-312 Electronics 1(3) 

PHYS-313 Electronics 11 (3) 

PHYS-322 Electronics Lab I (2) 

PHYS-323 Electronics Lab II (2) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (3()()-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options ( l()0-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-levcl and above Honors classes): and 



Level in Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. SUidents must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in tlie master's program. 

Minor in Applied Physics 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 1 2 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• PHYS-IOO Physics for the Modem World 5: 1 (4) 
or 

PHYS-105 College Physics I 5:1 (4) 

or 

PHYS- 1 10 Umversity Physics I 5:1 (4) 

• PHYS-200 Physics for the New Millennium 5:2 (3) 
or 

PHYS-205 College Physics II 5:2 (4) 

or 

PHYS-210 Umversity Physics II 5:2 (4) 

• PHYS-220 Astronomy 5:2 (3) 
or 

PHYS-230 Changing Views of the Universe 5:2 (3) 

• PHYS-370 Modem Physics (3) 

• 6 credit hours in elective courses at the 300 level or above , 
including courses outside of physics in relevant areas of 
technology, society, and policy, as approved by the 
department. 

Minor in Physics 

• 24 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• MATH-22 1 Calculus 1 (4) and 
MATH-222 Calculus 11(4) 

or 

MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus I (4) and 

MATH-212 Applied Calculus II (3) 



166 College of Arts and Sciences 



• PHYS-105 College Physics 1 5:1 (4) 
or 

PHYS- 1 1 University Physics 1 5 : 1 (4) 

• PHYS-205 College Physics 11 5:2 (4) 
or 

PHYS-210 University Physics II 5:2 (4) 

• PHYS-370 Modem Physics (3) 

• 6 credit hours in PHYS-xxx courses at the 300-level or 
above as appro\ed by the student's advisor 

Undergraduate Certificate in Applied 

Phvsics 

- — .^ — ^^^-^■^— 

Admission to the Program 

Open to undergraduate degree and nondegree students. 
Credits earned for the certificate may be applied toward an un- 
dergraduate degree program. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours of approved course work with at least 9 credit 
hours at the 300-level or above, with grades of C or better. 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fiilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 



the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 1 2 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• PHYS-IOO Physics forthe Modem World 5:1 (A)and 
PHYS-200 Physics for the New Millennium 5:2 (3) 
or 

PHYS-105 College Physics 1 5:1 (4) and 

PHYS-205 College Physics U 5:2 (4) 

or 

PHYS-1 10 University Physics I 5:1 (4) and 

PHYS-210 University Physics II 5:2 (4) 

• PHYS-370 Modem Physics (3) 

• 9 credit hours in elective courses, at least two of which must be 
at the 300 level or above, including courses outside of physics 
in relevant areas of technology, society, and policy, as 
approved by the department. 



Preprofessional Programs 



Pre-engineering 



Faculty Liaison Teresa Larkin, Department of Physics 

American University offers a cooperative five-year engi- 
neering program with the University of Mar>'land in College 
Park. American University students can combine the ad\an- 
tages of both liberal arts and professional education. Students 
are awarded two bachelor's degrees in a five-year period. 

Students spend three years on the American University cam- 
pus concentrating in a major field m the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences. In the third year, with recommendation of the 
pre-engineering faculty liaison, students apply to the engineering 
program at tlie Universit>- of Maryland. After admission to the 
program, the fourth year of study is spent there. Once the student 
completes the requirements for the American University major 
(generally at the end of the fourth year), the first bachelor's de- 
gree is awarded. After completion of the engineering require- 
ments during the fiftti year, the student receives a bachelor's 
degree in engineering from the University of Maryland. 

Students work closely with the pre-engineering faculty liai- 
son and a faculty advisor in one of the natural sciences, mathe- 
matics and statistics, computer science, or the office of the 
Associate Dean for Academic .Affairs. Advisors will individually 
tailor course selection to meet the student's interests and needs. 
Students are generally advised to major in either mathematics or 
a natural science, and to maintain a high grade point average. If 
however, the student chooses to complete a major in the arts, hu- 
manities, or social sciences, he or she may do so, provided that 



the engineering program requirements are also satisfied. Comple- 
tion of basic courses must be done during the first three years of 
study in order to complete the requirements for an engineering de- 
gree in five years. Courses with grades below C will not transfer to 
the cooperating schools. 

Course Requirements 

The engineering program at the University of Maryland has 
basic requirements covering a broad range of study, which must 
be completed before entrance: 

• Two courses in EngUsh composition 

• Two or three years of mathemarics, including calculus and 
differential equafions 

• Two years of general physics with laboratory and more 
in-depth study in mechanics and in electromagnetism or 
thermodynamics 

• One year of general chemistry with laboratory: for chemical 
engineering, a two-course sequence in organic chemistry 

• One course in computer programming 

• Five courses in the humanities and the social sciences 
Prior to applying to a particular engineering program, sUidents 
should also have taken ENES 1 00 Introduction to Engineering 
Design at the University of Maryland, which is offered every 
semester including tlie summer. 



Preprofessional Programs 167 



Prelaw 



Prelaw Advisors 

Douglas Vibert, College of Arts and Sciences 

Wick Stansbury. Kogod School of Business 

Jonnel Clothier, School of Communication 

Suzanne Skillmgs, School of International Service 

Linda Spicerand Nathan Williamson, School of Public Affairs 

In considering law school, it is important that the prelaw stu- 
dent understands law schools' educational philosophy. As the 
Law School Admission Bulletin states: "Any course, regardless 
of field, that helps you develop clear and systematic thinking, 
command of the English language, and a broad understanding 
of our society constitutes sound preparation for the study of law. 
Thus, law schools do not recommend specific undergraduate 
majors for prelaw students." The prelaw student should also re- 
alize that admission to law school is selective. Students contem- 
plating careers in law should plan their undergraduate study to 
undertake a substantial academic curriculum and acquire a 
background of outstanding extracurricular activities. 

Students interested in prelaw preparation follow the normal 
procedure for declaring and fijlfilling requirements for a major 
in one of the schools or departments or in gaining approval for 
an interdisciplinary program of study. Whatever the choice of 
major, the prelaw student's program should be supported by a 
broad selection of courses from mathematics, the natural sci- 
ences, the social sciences, and the humanities. 

Courses recommended by law schools also include philoso- 
phy, literature and advanced writing courses, history, political 
science, accounting, business administration, economics, math- 
ematics, languages, and other courses demanding logical think- 
ing, analytical reasoning, or verbal proficiency. 

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is required of ev- 
ery applicant to law school. It is strongly recommended that this 
test be taken in June before the senior year. With this test date, 
students can appraise their prospects and consider retaking the 
examination in October or December or both, or, if necessary, 
make alternate plans. Students apply directly to the Law School 
Admissions Service (LSAS) to take the test on the American 
University campus and should register six weeks before the test 
date. LSAT applications are available from the prelaw advisors. 



Premedical Programs 



Premed Programs Coordinator 

Lynne Ameson. Department of Chemistry 
202-885-2186 
premed^american.edu 
www.american.edu/cas/premed/ 

The premedical programs of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences are available to help all undergraduate, 
postbaccalaureate, and graduate students who are considering a 
career in medicine or one of the allied health professions. 



Premedical program services include extensive individual 
advising on careers, courses, volunteer and research opportuni- 
ties, professional school examinations, selection of schools, and 
financial aid. The program also provides seminars by health 
professionals, resume preparation and essay writing assistance, 
medical school interview preparation, preparation of a compos- 
ite letter of evaluation, and support in compiling and sending 
letters of recommendation to professional schools. 

The annual Health Professions Seminar features first-hand 
advice from guests and former American University students 
who have gone on to health professional schools. 

The annual Health Careers Forum brings together health 
professionals, admissions officers, and career counselors who 
provide an overview of assistance available to students as well 
as opportunities and highlights of the admissions process for 
allopathic and osteopathic medical, dental, and veterinary 
schools, and physician assistant, nurse practitioner, physical 
therapy, podiatry, optometry, public health, and other allied 
health programs. 

Students from American University applying to medical, 
dental, or veterinary school have been highly competitive, with 
86 percent of qualified applicants accepted by medical schools. 
Advising Services 

Students interested in the health professions should contact 
the premedical programs coordinator as soon as possible. The 
coordinator helps students select an appropriate curriculimi, 
prepare for the relevant admissions tests, make realistic choices 
of professional schools, and learn first-hand about biomedical 
research and clinical pracfice. The coordinator is available to 
meet with sUidents individually at least once a semester to re- 
view their academic progress and course of study at American 
University. Together with students' academic advisors, the co- 
ordinator helps assure timely completion of both degree and 
premedical requirements. 

Typically, at the end of their junior year premedical students 
submit a primary application to the American Medical Colleges 
Application Service, which forwards this general applicarion to 
specified schools. Medical schools will then send individual ap- 
plicarions to selected students. 

In order to prepare professional-school applications, each 
student assembles a file containing essential information. Mem- 
bers of the Premedical Evaluation Committee serve as mentors 
for students. The Writing Center and the Career Center can pro- 
vide advice about writing personal statements and other docu- 
ments and interview practice. After the file, including letters of 
recoinmendation, is assembled, a comprehensive Premedical 
Evaluation Committee letter of evaluation will be prepared to 
support the application. Included in the letter is a summary of 
the academic record and extracurricular activities, and an eval- 
uation of commitment to a medical career. 
Premedical Curriculum 

Traditionally, premedical students have majored in the natu- 
ral sciences. However, the medical professions are also seeking 
well-rounded students with a broadly-ba,sed liberal education, 
reflecting the social, ethical, and cultural roles played by health 



168 College of Arts and Sciences 



care professionals. Students interested in medical careers may 
major in any field, but must make carefijl plans to take the nec- 
essary preparatory courses in a timely fashion. 

Most health professional schools require certain founda- 
tion courses in science and mathematics, along with a ftill year 
of college-level writing. Ail science courses must include lab- 
oratory components. Undergraduate students who wish to ma- 
triculate at a professional school directly after graduation from 
American University must submit applications at the end of 
the junior year. Therefore, the basic requirements should be 
completed in the freshman and sophomore years, following 
the sequence of courses listed below. 
Freshman Year 

BIO-1 10 General Biology I 5; I (4) 

BIO-210 General Biology II 5:2 (4) 

CHEM- 110 General Chemistry 15:1 (4) 

CHEM-2 10 General Chemistry II 5:2 (4) 

MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 
Sophomore Year 

BIO-300 Cell Biology with Laboratory (4) 

BIO-356 Genetics with Laboratory (5) 

CHEM-3 10 Organic Chemistry I (3) 

CHEM-312 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory ( I ) 

CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry II (3) 

CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry II Laboratoiy ( I ) 

PHYS-1 10 University Physics I 5: 1 (4) 

PHYS-210 University Physics II 5:2 (4) 
This intensive plan also prepares students to take the Med- 
ical College Admissions Test (MCAT) in the spring of their ju- 
nior year. 

To receive most favorable consideration, the Medical Col- 
lege Admissions Test (MCAT) or Dental Aptimde Test (DAT) 
must be taken in the spring of the junior year, about 16 months 
before matriculation in medical or dental school. Veterinary 
schools typically require that the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion (GRE) be taken at the end of the junior year 

The above sequence presumes that a student has aheady 
decided by the beginning of his or her freshman year to pursue 
a premedical course of study. Students who do not decide on a 
medical career until the middle of their undergraduate smdies 
or later may need to complete their premedical requirements 
during summers or in a post-baccalaureate year. 
Research and Internship Opportunities 

The premedical program encourages close interaction with 
the faculty. Many undergraduates have engaged in independ- 
ent research projects in biology, chemistry, physics, and exper- 
imental psychology which have led to presentation and 
publication of papers. 

Many opportunities for internships, volunteer work, and 
biomedical research are available. Local hospitals and clinics 
provide students with clinical experience. At institutions such 
as the National Institutes of Health and other local laboratories 
and bioteclinology companies, students may gain first-hand 



basic research experience in biochemistry, immunology, molec- 
ular biology, and molecular genetics. 
Premedical Achievement Prize and Scholarship 

The American University Hassa S. Shanker Premedical 
Achievement Prize is a $1,000 cash award presented to the most 
outstanding undergraduate student intending to apply to a health 
professional school who has taken at least five science and math- 
ematics courses at American University. Selection is based on 
academic achievements, leadership qualities, and contributions 
to society or the health professions. Applicants must be planning 
to apply to medical, dental, or veterinary school, or to a program 
in the health sciences, such as physical therapy. 

The Josephine G Gimble Scholarship is a $1,500 annual 
award to an undergraduate or postbaccalaureate student prepar- 
ing for a career in the allied health sciences. 

Postbaccalaureate Premedical Certificate 

Certificate Coordinator Christopher Tudge, 
Department of Biology, ctudge(a;american.edu 
www.amencan.edu/cas/prog postbac.cfin 

Postbaccalaureate work consists of academic study under- 
taken after earning a bachelor's degree. American University's 
Postbaccalaureate Premedical Certificate program is designed to 
complete basic requirements and strengthen credentials for ap- 
plication to health professional schools of human medicine 
(M.D. or D.O.), dentistry (D.D.S.), veterinary medicine 
(D.V.M.), podiatry (D.PM.), optometry (O.D. ), and oral surgery 
(D.M.D.), and to advanced degree programs in the allied health 
sciences such as public health (M.RH.) and physician assistant, 
nurse practitioner, and physical therapy programs leading to the 
M.S. or Ph.D. degree. 

This program offers students extensive guidance and assis- 
tance in preparing for professional school and a career With the 
help of advisors they polish resume and essay-v\'riting skills, pre- 
pare for the Medical College Aptitude Test (MC^T) or other ad- 
missions examinations, practice medical school interviews, 
select potential professional schools, and address related finan- 
cial issues. Tlirough the program, students may also attend semi- 
nars by health professionals, identity volunteer opportunities, 
and be matched with a mentor Each emerges with a composite 
letter of evaluation, held with letters of recommendation in a per- 
sonal file. The premedical programs coordinator sends these let- 
ters to professional schools for students and assists them in 
meeting all application deadlines. 
Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree and a cumulative 
grade point average of 3.20 (on a 4.00 scale) overall and in sci- 
ence and niathematic courses, if taken. 
Course Requirements 

Basic Requirements 

The following courses are required for admission to medical 
school and to many other health professional schools. Once en- 
rolled in the Postbaccalaureate Premedical Certificate program, 
any of tliese courses not already completed must be taken at 
American University. 



Psychology 169 



• BlO-1 10 General Biology 1 (4) 

• BlO-210 General Biology II (4) 

• CHEM-1 10 General Chemistry I (4) 

• CHEM-210 General Chemistry II (4) 

• CHEM-3 10 Organic Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-3 1 2 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory ( 1 ) 

• CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry II (3) 

• CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (1) 

• MATH-221 Calculus 1(4) 

• PHYS-1 10 University Physics 1(4) 

• PHYS-210 University Physics II (4) 

Certificate Requirements 

A minimum of 24 hours of course work taken in residence at 

American University, including: 



BIO-300 Cell Biology with Laboratory (4) 

BIO-356 Genetics with Laboratory (5) 

One of the following sets of two courses; 

BIO-435 Vertebrate Physiology (5) and 

BIO-440 Microbiology (4) 

or 

CHEM-560 Biochemistry I (3) and 

CHEM-561 Biochemistry II (3) 

6-9 credit hours from the Basic Requirements list above or 

the following; 

BIO-200 Structure and Function of the Human Body (3) 

BIO-541 Cellular Immunology (3) 

BIO-550 Developmental Biology (3) 

BIO-583 Molecular Biology (3) 

MATH-222 Calculus II (4) 

STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 



Psychology 



Chair Anthony L. Riley 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus E.M. McGinnies, B. Slotnick 

Professor J J. Gray, D.A. Haaga, B.W. McCarthy, 

S.R. Parker, F. Z. Peynircioglu, A.L. Riley, A.M. Siiberberg, 

S.J. Weiss, B.T. Yates 

Associate Professor A.H. Ahrens, M. Carter, B.D. Fantie, 

K.C. Gunthert, L.M. Juiiano, A. G Shaprio, C.S. Weissbrod 

Assistant Professor CM. Cheng, N. Enchautegui-de-Jesus, 

G Mance 

The undergraduate program in the Department of Psychol- 
ogy offers the student an opportunity to appreciate psychol- 
ogy's diversity and its applications. Courses are offered in 
clinical, social, personality, developmental, behavioral neuro- 
science, and experimental psychology. Advanced topics 
courses in these and related areas are often available. Students 
may design programs that approach psychology as a social sci- 
ence, a natural science, or a combination of the two. Advanced 
students have the opportunity to become actively involved in 
both psychological research and paraprofessional counseling. 
During their junior and senior years, majors are encouraged to 
take small, specialized seminars and engage in supervised inde- 
pendent study. Undergraduate majors also have opportunities 
for internship experience with community mental health agen- 
cies and may participate in ongoing research within the depart- 
ment. The program is sufficiently flexible and broad to satisfy 
career goals and provide a solid background for graduate study. 

Students interested in careers such as those in research and 
teaching, mental health professions, and personnel and indus- 
trial psychology will want to choose curricula suited to their 
goals. The breadth of the field of psychology and of the depart- 
ment's course offerings make careful planning important. Stu- 
dents should consult their faculty advisors in planning their 
schedules. 



Affiliations 

Washington, D.C. Veterans Administration Hospital; Balti- 
more Veterans Administration Hospital; St. Elizabeth's Hospi- 
tal; Community Psychiatric Center, Bethesda, MD; Department 
of Pediatrics, Georgetown University Hospital; Kennedy Insti- 
tute, Baltimore; Children's Hospital Institute for Behavioral 
Resources; George Washington University Medical Center; 
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Veterans Ad- 
ministration Medical Center, Perry Point, MD; Alexandria 
Community Mental Health Center; Woodbum Center for Com- 
munity Mental Health; and Department of Psychiatry. Eastern 
Virginia Medical School; National Institutes of Health. 

B.A. in Psychology 

Admission to tiie Program 

Formal admission to the major requires departmental ap- 
proval. 

University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 4 1 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 5 credit 
hours at the 300 level or above 



170 Collegeof Arts and Sciences 



Course Requirements 

• PSYC- 105 Psychology: Understanding 

Human Behavior 4:1 (3) 

• PSYC-1 15 Psychology as a Natural Science 5: 1 (3) 

• PSYC- 1 1 6 Psychology as a Natural Science ( 1 ) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• One course in Research Methods from the following: 
PSYC-301 Research Methods in Psychology (3) 
PSYC-433 Research Design and Methods; Social Science 

Psychology Research (4) 
PSYC-480 Research Design and Methods: Experimental 
Psychology (4) 

• One course in Bio-Psychology from the following: 
PSYC-240 Drugs and' Beha\ior 5 :2 (3 ) 

PSYC-3 1 8 Fundamentals of Human Neuropsychology (3) 
PSYC-325 Neurobiological Bases of Behavior (3) 
PSYC-360 The Evolution of Behavior (3) 

• One course in Learning and Cognition from the following: 
PSYC-200 Behavior Principles 5:2 (3) 
PSYC-220Tlie Senses 5:2 (3) 

PSYC-300 Memory and Cognition (3) 
PSYC-370 Learning and Behavior (3) 

• Two courses in the Individual, the Situation, and 
Psychological Health from the following: 

PSYC-205 Social Psychology 4:2 (3) 

PSYC-215 Abnormal Psychology and Society 4:2 (3) 

PSYC-235 Theones of Personality 4:2 (3) 

PSYC-333 Health Psychology (3) 

PSYC-350 Child Psychology (3) 

• Psychology electives to complete the required credit hours 
Students will be advised concerning 300-500-level courses 
available as electives. 

Note: No more than a combined total of 6 credit hours of 
PSYC-390 Independent Reading Course in Psychology, 
PSYC-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience, 
PSYC-490 Independent Study Project in Psychology, and 
PSYC-491 Internship, will apply toward ftilfiUing major re- 
quirements. 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Suidents may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 1 00-200-level Honors classes); 
Level 11 Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu'academic.depts/honors, . 



Combined B.A. and M.A. in Psyciiology 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its accelerated 
bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students may 
complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the grad- 
uate degree that may be applied to the requirements for both de- 
gree programs. The department that oversees the graduate 
program the student enters will detemiine if the courses the un- 
dergraduate sUident completes will satisfy master's degree re- 
quirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 
1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. 

This program enables qualified students to earn, in a continu- 
ous plan of suidy, both the B.A. and M.A. in Psychology. 

Requirements 

• Students should apply for the program no later than the first 
semester of the senior year and no earlier than the first 
semester of the junior year. Students must have a minimum 
3.00 grade point average in psychology and statistics courses 
and must have completed at least half of the credit hours 
required for the B.A. in Psychology, including STAT-202 
Basic Statistics, before applying to the program. Students must 
submit a completed graduate application form. Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) scores for the General 
examination (Verbal, Quantitative, and Analytic), two letters 
of recommendation, and copies of all college transcripts. 

• All requirements for the B.A. in Psychology 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work to satisfy the 
requirements for both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in Psychology , including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Psychology 

• 22 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor, and at least 9 credit hours at the 300 
level or above 

Course Requirements 

• PSYC- 1 05 Psychology: Understanding 

Human Behavior 4:1 (3) 

• PSYC- 115 Psychology as a Natural Science 5:1(4) 

• 3 credit hours from Bio-Psychology or Learning and 
Cognition courses (see major requirements above) 

• 3 credit hours from the Individual, the Situation, and 
Psychological Health courses (see major requirements above) 

• 9 additional credit hours in psychology courses 



Psychology 171 



M.A. in Psychology 



Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must earn a satisfactory 
score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General ex- 
amination. Admission is based on academic record, test scores, 
and two letters of recommendation. 

Completion of the degree does not necessarily lead to ad- 
mission to the Ph.D. program; students who wish to be consid- 
ered for the Ph.D. program must apply. Applicants with a B.A. 
who wish to obtain a Ph.D. in Psychology fr^om American Uni- 
versity should apply directly to the Ph.D. program. If they do 
not have an M.A., students will earn one as part of the Ph.D. 
program. See the description of the Ph.D. program for more in- 
formation. 

Up to 6 credit hours of graduate course work in psychology 
from another university or up to 12 credit hours of graduate 
course credit taken at American University may be transferred, 
provided that these credits were not counted toward another de- 
gree. TTiese transfers of credit are subject to approval by the di- 
rector of the M.A. program. 
Tracks 

General, Personality/Social, or Experimental/Biological 
Degree Requirements 

• 33 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Written general comprehensive examination 

• Thesis option: The master's thesis involves an original 
research project. Students must prepare a thesis proposal, 
collect and analyze data, submit a written thesis, and give an 
oral defense. The thesis must be accepted by the thesis 
committee, the department chair, and the university. 
Nonthesis option: available only in the General Psychology 
track (see course requirements below). 

All course work for the thesis or nonthesis option must be 
completed with grades of B or better 
Course Requirements 
General Psychology 

• Two courses from the following: 

PSYC-505 Advanced Personality Psychology (3) 
PSYC-514 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3) 
PSYC-533 Cognitive Behavior Therapy (3) 
PSYC-540 Advanced Social Psychology (3) 
PSYC-545 Psychology of Sex Similarities and 

Differences (3) 
PSYC-55 1 Psychopathology: Theory and Research (3) 
PSYC-560 .Advanced Child Psychology (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) (personality/social 

psychology) 
PSYC-633 Psychological Assessment 1 (3) 
PSYC-670 Behavioral Medicine (3) 

• Two courses from the following: 
PSYC-501 Physiological Psychology (3) 



PSYC-513 Neuropharmacology: The Biochemistry of 

Behavior (3) 
PSYC-5 1 8 Advanced Human Neuropsychology (3) 
PSYC-530 Conditioning and Learning (3) 
PSYC-575 Advanced Memory and Cognition (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) 

(experimental'biological psychology) 
PSYC-618 Principles of Neuropsychological 

Assessment (3) 
graduate seminar in experimental psychology or 

neuroscience (3) 

• Graduate statistics course (3) 

Nonthesis Option (General Psychology track only): 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
PSYC-550 Psychological Research (3) 
PSYC-698 Directed Research (3-6) 

• 12 credit hours of graduate elective courses with at least 6 
credit hours from the Department of Psychology 

Thesis Option: 

• PSYC-550 Psychological Research (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
PSYC-796 Master's Thesis Seminar (3) 
PSYC-797 Master's Thesis Research (1-3) 

• 9 credit hours of graduate elective courses with at least 6 
credit hours from the Department of Psychology 

Personality/Social Psychology 

• Four courses from the following: 

PSYC-505 Advanced Personality Psychology (3) 
PSYC-514 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3) 
PSYC-533 Cognitive Behavior Therapy (3) 
PSYC-540 Advanced Social Psychology (3) 
PSYC-545 Psychology of Sex Similarities and 

Differences (3) 
PSYC-55 1 Psychopathology: Theory and Research (3) 
PSYC-560 Advanced Child Psychology (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) (personality /social 

psychology) 
PSYC-633 Psychological Assessment 1 (3) 
PSYC-670 Behavioral Medicine (3) 
graduate seminar in clinical, personality, or .social 

psychology (3) 

• Two courses from the following: 
PSYC-501 Physiological Psychology (3) 

PSYC-5 1 3 Neuropharmacology: The Biochemistry of 

Behavior (3) 
PSYC-5 18 Advanced Human Neuropsychology (3) 
PSYC-530 Conditioning and Learning (3) 
PSYC-575 Advanced Memory and Cognition (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) 

(experimental biological psychology) 
PSYC-618 Principles of Neuropsychological Assessment (3) 



172 College of Arts and Sciences 



graduate seminar in experimental psychology or 
neuroscience (3) 

• PSYC-550 Psychological Research (3) 

• 6 credit hours from tlie following: 
PSYC-796 Master's Thesis Seminar (3) 
PSYC-797 Master's Thesis Research (1-3) 

• Graduate statistics course (3) 

• Graduate ilective course (3) 

Experimental/Biological Psychology 

• Four courses from the following: 
PSYC-501 Physiological Psychology (3) 
PSYC-513 Neuropharmacology: The Biochemistry of 

Behavior (3) 
PSYC-518 Advanced Human Neuropsychology (3) 
PSYC-530 Conditioning and Learning (3) 
PSYC-575 Advanced Memory and Cognition (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) 

(experimental/biological psychology) 
PSYC-618 Principles of Neuropsychological Assessment (3) 
PSYC-690 Independent Study Project (3) in a recognized 

area of experimental/biological psychology 
graduate seminar in experimental psychology or 

neuroscience 

• Two courses from the following: 

PSYC-505 Advanced Personality Psychology (3) 
PSYC-514 Industrial/Oiganizational Psychology (3) 
PSYC-533 Cognitive Behavior Therapy (3) 
PSYC-540 Advanced Social Psychology (3) 
PSYC-545 Psychology of Sex Similarities and 

Differences (3) 
PSYC-55 1 Psychopathology: Theory and Research (3) 
PSYC-560 Advanced Child Psychology (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) (personality/social 

psychology) 
PSYC-633 Psychological Assessment 1 (3) 
PSYC-670 Behavioral Medicine (3) 
graduate seminar in clinical, personality, or social 

psychology (3) 

• PSYC-550 Psychological Research (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
PSYC-796 Master's Thesis Seminar (3) 
PSYC-797 Master's Thesis Research (1-3) 

• Graduate statistics course (3) 

• Graduate elective course (3) 

Ph.D. in Psychology 

There are two tracks within the doctoral program, clinical 
psychology (APA accredited), and behavior, cognition and 
neuroscience. Students who have been admitted to the doctoral 
program in psychology but do not have an M.A. in psychology 
that has been accepted by the department must complete the 



degree requirements for the M.A. in Psychology (thesis option) 
before they can be awarded the doctorate. 

The Clinical program is fully accredited by the American 
Psychological Association Committee on Accreditation (CO A) 
and has been accredited since 1972. COA is part of the Otfice of 
Program Consultation and Accreditation (OPCA). OPCA con- 
tact information is as follows: 

Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation 

750 First Street, NE 

Washington, DC 2002-4242 

Phone: 202-336-5979 

TDD/TTY: 202-336-6123 

Fax: 202-336-5978 

Email: apaaccred@apa.org 

http://www.apa.org/ed/accreditation 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, applicants must eam a satisfactory score on 
the Graduate Record Examination (General and Advanced Psy- 
chology tests). Admission is based on test scores, previous aca- 
demic performance, and letters of recommendation. Those 
applicants to the clinical psychology track judged to be among 
the top 30 or 35 are invited for an interview, and the final selec- 
tion is based on all information, including the interview. Students 
are admitted for full-time study only. 
Tracks 

Clinical Psychology or Behavior, Cognition and Neuroscience 
(BCAN) 
Degree Requirements 

• 72 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Two tools of research are required but do not result in course 
credit toward the degree. The tool requirement is flexible and 
can be met in a variety of ways: 

1 ) demonstration of knowledge of a language relevant to the 
student's career; 

2) demonstration of mastery in a computer program language; 

3) satisfactory completion of one skill-oriented graduate 
course offered by another department at American University 
or by nonpsychology departments of the Consortium 
universities; 

4) participation in one clinical institute which is approximately 
equal in time and difficulty to a full course; and 

5) supervised tool training in other settings when approved by 
the student's advisor and the department chair. 

• Four comprehensive examinations outlined by advisors or 
other faculty members. These are tasks which involve students 
in the kinds of activities they will later engage in as 
professional psychologists. At least one of the four 
comprehensives must be oral and at least two must be written. 

• Dissertation: A written proposal for the dissertation is to be 
submitted to the dissertation committee by the middle of the 
second semester of the third year. The original proposal, or a 
revision thereof, should meet the requirements of the 



Sociology 173 



committee by the end of the second semester of the third year. 
This allows adequate time for completion of a quality 
dissertation even if initial experimentation turns out to be 
exploratory in nature. The dissertation must be accepted by 
the dissertation committee, the department chair, and the 
university. 

• Clinical Psychology track: As part of the doctoral clinical 
track requirements, clinical students serve a one-year 
internship in an appropriate setting outside the university. 

Course Requirements 
Clinical Psychology 

• PSYC-502 Histop,' and Systems of P,sychology (3) 

• PSYC-550 Psychological Research (3) 

• PSYC-551 Psychopathology: Theory and Research (3) 

• PSYC-61 8 Principles of Neuropsychological Assessment (3) 
or a.ssessment course approved by the department 

• PSYC-630 Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, and 

Practice (3) 

• PSYC-633 Psychological Assessment I (3) 

• PSYC-652 Assessment of Intellectual Function and 

Personality (3) 

• PSYC-680 Experiential Psychotherapy Practicum 1(3) 

• PSYC-681 Experiential Psychotherapy Practicum 11 (3) 

• PSYC-7 1 Behavior Therapy Practicum ( 3 ) 

• PSYC-791 Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Practicum 1 (3) 

• PSYC-792 Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Practicum II (3) 

• One course in Biological Bases of Behavior from the 
following: 

PSYC-501 Physiological Psychology (3) 

PSYC-5 1 3 Neurophamiacology: The Biochemistry of 

Behavior (3) 
PSYC-5 18 Advanced Human Neuropsychology 

• One course in Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior from 
the following: 



PSYC-530 Conditioning and Learning (3) 
PSYC-575 Advanced Memory and Cognition (3) 

• One course in Individual Bases of Behavior from the 
following: 

PSYC-505 Advanced Personality Psychology (3) 
PSYC-560 Advanced Child Psychology (3) 

• One course in Social Bases of Behavior from the following: 
PSYC-521 Ethnic and Minority Issues (3) 
PSYC-540 Advanced Social Psychology (3) 
PSYC-545 Psychology of Sex Differences (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
PSYC-798 Doctoral Dissertation Seminar (3) 
PSYC-799 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9) 

• 6 credit hours of statistics 

Behavior, Cognition and Neuroscience 

• 6 credit hours of PSYC-598 Neuroscience Seminar (3) 

• 1 8 credit hours trom the following: 
PSYC-501 Physiological Psychology (3) 
PSYC-5 13 Neurophamiacology (3) 

PSYC-5 1 8 Advanced Human Neuropsychology (3) 
PSYC-530 Conditioning and Learning (3) 
PSYC-551 Psychopathology: Theory and Research (3) 
PSYC-560 Advanced Child Psychology (3) 
PSYC-575 Advanced Memory and Cognition (3) 
PSYC-61 8 Principles of Neuropsychological Assessment (3) 
Other courses focusing in the neurosciences may be taken 
with approval of the student's advisor and the Graduate 
Curriculum Committee. 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
PSYC-798 Doctoral Dissertation Seminar (3) 
PSYC-799 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9) 

• 6 credit hours of statistics 

• 12 credit hours of electives 

• 24 credit hours of lab research 



Sociology 



Chair John Drysdale 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Enieritus/a G H. Mueller, K. K. Petersen, 

J.C. Scott. J. K. Siegenthaler, A. Van der Slice 

Professor E. Chow. J. Drysdale, K. Kusterer, R. Stone 

Associate Professor B. J. Dickerson, C. Pascale, GA. Young 

Assistant Professor A. Brenner, 1. Ibrahim. S. McDonic, 

C. Ruiz-Junco, S. Vidal-Ortiz. C. Xiao 

Scholars-in-Residence S. Hoecker-Drysdale, 

J. Neibrugge-Brantley, M. Roumani 



Sociology explores how individuals, through their collec- 
tive actions, create and change patterns of social relations and 



how. in turn, these social relations influence people's lives. So- 
ciologists focus on three major levels of analysis, frotn whole 
societies as component parts of wider systems, to institutions as 
component sectors of .society, to individuals as participants in 
two-person groups. They also study varied processes of social 
change, from migration to social mobility, from urbanization to 
mass communication. Finally, sociologists study a wide variety 
of themes, from racial and ethnic relations to social problems 
and political change. This quest for knowledge is both an end in 
itself and a pathway for infonned social change. 

The Department of Sociology of the College of Arts and 
Sciences shares a common purpose of education and research 
for social justice in an increasingly global social system. Fac- 



174 College of Arts and Sciences 



ulty and students are empowered to participate in building eq- 
uitable, humane, and sustainable social institutions by creating 
sociological knowledge and applying professional research 
skills to produce effective policies and programs for social 
change. One source of its strength is the department's multi- 
cultural diversity, which its members take every opportunity to 
expand. 

The Sociology Department serves the university, including 
smdents from throughout the world, as a center for the study of 
societal change, social institutions, and social processes, with 
an emphasis on inequality and social justice. Degree programs 
focus on forms of inequality, their origins and patterns or re- 
production, related to issues of social justice, and how these is- 
sues vary within and between societies. They are intended to 
produce and apply knowledge for the benefit of society, not 
only to teach academic skills, but also to develop knowledge 
of value to those involved in working for the promotion of so- 
cial equalitj'. The programs prepare students for a variety of 
careers in social advocacy, research, teaching, human services, 
and both public and private sector policy-making institutions. 
Successfiil placements of the department's graduates in aca- 
demic, research, and policy-making institutions attest to the 
high standards our graduates meet. 

The department's focus on intemational and comparative 
sociology and public sociology are especially well suited to 
Washington, D.C., an intemational capital and center for pol- 
icy making. American University's location provides unparal- 
leled access to government, research instimtions, data and 
archival sources, advocacy organizations, and leaders in- 
volved in social change. 

The undergraduate program is unique in its emphasis on 
race, gender, social justice, global social change and applied 
sociology/social policy. Majors and minors take core course 
sequences in sociological theory and research methods, and 
courses from several areas of concentration. Membership in 
the American University chapter of Alpha Kappa Delta, the in- 
temational honor society in Sociology, is open to qualifying 
majors. The society sponsors lectures and other activities that 
involve undergraduates in the professional workings of the dis- 
cipline. 

The Department of Sociology's graduate program consists 
of core training in sociological theory and research method, 
plus an area of concentration in public sociology, race, gender, 
and social justice; global sociology; social inequality; or gen- 
der and family. The program not only teaches academic skills, 
but also de\elops knowledge of benefit to those w orking for 
the promotion of social equality. Course are designed to enable 
students to deepen their knowledge of a specialty area, to de- 
velop advanced and systematic theoretical understanding, and 
to develop methodological areas for vocational and profes- 
sional competence. 



B.A. in Sociology 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires department approval. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foimdation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each of 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 43 credit hours with grades of C or better; no more than 1 3 
credit hours may be at the 100 or 200 level 

Course Requirements 

• SOCY-150 Global Sociology 4:1 (3) 

• SOCY-3 1 5 Major Social Theorists (3) 

• SOCY-320 Introduction to Social Research (3) 

• SOCY-491 Internship (3) 
or 

SOCY-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) 
or an approved equivalent experience 

• SOCY-492 Major Research Seminar (3) 

• 3 credit hours of advanced theory from the following: 
SOCY-4I5 Current Issues in Social Theory (3) 
SOCY-515 Models of Societal Development (3) 

• 3 credit hours of advanced research methods from the 
following; 

SOCY-525 Social Advocacy and Change (3) 

SOCY-580 Social Policy Analysis (3) 

or other methods course approved by the advisor 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• 1 8 credit hours in sociology electives. with no more than 
two courses at the 1 00 or 200 level, and at least one course at 
the 500 level. Smdents should take at least one course from 
four of the following concentrations: 

Race, Gender, and Social Justice 

Global Sociology /Regional Studies 

Social Inequality 

Gender and Family 

Applied Sociology/Social Policy 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 



Sociology 175 



courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 100-200-leveI Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to wwvy.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined B.A. and M.A. in Sociology 

American University offers students the opportunity to eam 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisty master's degree 
requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at 
least 1 8 in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the 
bachelor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential 
enrollment in the two programs. 

This program enables qualified students to eam, in a contin- 
uous plan of study, both the B.A. and MA. in Sociology. 
Requirements 

• Students should apply for this program in the second semester 
of the junior year. Students must have a minimum overall 
3.00 grade point average. Admissions decisions to the 
combined program follow the same procedures and standards 
used to evaluate graduate applicants to the M.A. Students 
interested in applying to this combined program should 
consult with their advisor and other faculty members before 
formal application is begun. 

• All requirements for the B.A. in Sociology 
Undergraduate students may apply up to 12 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work in sociology, including 
STAT-514 Statistical Methods, to satisfy the requirements of 
both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in Sociology, including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Sociology 

• 21 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• SOCY-150 Global Sociology 4:1 (3) 

• SOCY-3 1 5 Major Social Theonsts (3) 

• SOCY-320 Introduction to Social Research (3) 

• 3 credit hours of advanced theory or research methods from 
the following: 



SOCY-415 Current Issues in Social Theory (3) 
SOCY-515 Models of Societal Development (3) 
SOCY-525 Social Advocacy and Change (3) 
SOCY-580 Social Policy Analysis (3) 

• 9 credit hours in sociology electives. with no more than one 
course at the 100 or 200 level. Students should take one 
course from three of the following concentrations; 

Race. Gender, and Social Justice 

Global Sociology 

Social Inequality 

Gender and Family 

Applied Sociology/Social Policy 



M.A. in Sociology 



Admission to the Program 

Applicants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for admission to graduate study, including a bachelor's degree 
from an accredited institution, with at least a 3.3 (on a 4.0 scale) 
grade point average. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test 
scores are required. A background in the social sciences is 
strongly preferred. Admission to the program is at the discretion 
of the department's Graduate Committee and is based on aca- 
demic record and letters of recommendation from two persons 
able to evaluate the applicant's potential for graduate study in 
sociology. Provisional admission may be considered on a 
case-by-case basis where minimum university requirements are 
not fully met. 

Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work, including the 
research requirement 

• Tool of research: STAT-514 Statistical Methods, or another 
approved graduate-level statistics or specialized methods 
course 

• One written comprehensive examination covering 
sociological theory and methods of social research: 

The exam is taken after completion of two theory courses and 
two research methods courses. Full-time students must take 
the exam before beginning their second year in the program. 
Students who have taken prior relevant course work in 
sociology may opt to take the exam before taking the required 
courses. After taking the related courses, a maximum of two 
attempts of the exam are permitted. 

• Research requirement: 

SOCY-797 Master's Thesis Independent Study (3 or 6 credit 

hours) 

The thesis offers students the opportunify to specialize as well 

as fiirther develop research skills. Students chose the subject 

of the thesis in consultation with their advisor 

or 

SOCY-795 Master's Research: Independent Study (3) 



176 College of Arts and Sciences 



Completion of a substantial research report related to the 
student's field of concentration under the guidance of a 
professor of the student's choice. 

Advanced courses in research methods, an advanced 
seminar in the student's field of concentration, or an 
independent study course in tlie field of concentration ( 3 ) 
All course work taken for the research requirement must be 
taken with grades of B or better 
Course Requirements 

• SOCY-610 History of Sociological Theory (3) 

• SOCY-61 1 Modem Sociological Theory (3) 

• SOCY-620 Social Research I (3) 

• SOCY-621 Social Research II (3) 

• STAT-514 Statistical Methods (3) 

• SOCY-795 Master's Research: Independent Study (3) 
or 

SOCY-797 Master's Thesis Independent Study (1-6) 

• 9-12 credit hours from one of the following concentrations, 
chosen in consultation with the student's advisor. Lists of 
approved courses for concentrations are available fi'om the 
Sociology Department: 

Public Sociology 

Race, Gender, and Social Justice 

Global Sociology 

Social Inequality 

Gender and Family 

• 6-9 credit hours in approved elective courses, including a 
3-credit hour internship 



Graduate Certificate in Social Research 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent from 
an accredited institution. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Prerequisite 

• STAT-5 14 Statistical Methods (3), or other graduate-level 
statistics course, or statistics examination 

Course Requirements (15 credit hours) 

• SOCY-620 Social Research I (3) 

• SOCY-621 Social Research II (3) 

• 9 credit hours fi-om graduate-level sociology courses selected 
in consultation with the graduate director. Courses outside the 
Sociology Department may substituted with the approval of 
the graduate director. 



Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) 



Director Naomi S. Baron 
Coordinator Brock Brady 



The demand for teachers of English to speakers of other 
languages has markedly increased as changing national sys- 
tems and global concerns have created an interdependent 
world. American University's TESOL program is distinctive 
in its focus on experiential learning — students plan lessons, 
observe classes, and design tests for English language classes. 
Faculty draw on their extensive teaching experience, research, 
and interaction with other cultures to provide pragmatic les- 
sons and advice to TESOL students. 

AU offers a variety of opportunities in TESOL including a 
combined Bachelor's'M.A. program, an M.A. in TESOL (with 
a joint AU/Peace Corps program), and a certificate open to 
both undergraduate and graduate students. An ESOL track is 
available in the M.A.T. program and a graduate teaching cer- 
fificate (see the School of Education, Teaching and Health for 
more infonnation). In addition, the program offers an annual 



TESOL Summer Institute, which includes regular summer ses- 
sion classes plus an intensive workshop. 

M.A. in TESOL (Teaching English to 
Speakers of Other Languages) 

.Admission to the Program 

■Applicants to the master's program in TESOL are subject to 
the minimum university requirements for admission to graduate 
study. Further, a grade point average of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) in 
the undergraduate major. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
scores, and two letters of academic reference are required. It is 
strongly recommended that native speakers of English have 
some background in at least one other language. International 
students are expected to demonstrate competence in English 
equivalent to a score of 600 or better on the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). Part-time as well as full-time sm- 
dents are welcome in the program. 

A joint program between the Peace Corps and American Uni- 
versity enables participants to prepare for Peace Corps English 
teaching assignments while earning an M.A. in TESOL. Applica- 



Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) 1 77 



tion is made separately to American University and the Peace 
Corps. Admission requirements for the M.A. program are the 
same as above. The Peace Corps accepts American citizens only 
and participants must meet all other Peace Corps requirements 
prior to beginning Peace Corps service. Successful participants 
will begin their Peace Corp training and service after they have 
completed tlie bulk of their academic work. The Peace Corps ser- 
vice experience constitutes the equivalent of a 6-credit hour in- 
ternship, for which the tuition is waived. Also, TESL-620 may be 
waived for students in the AU/Peace Corps program, for a total of 
33 credit hours for the degree. 

Note: This program is not designed for K-12 ESOL licensure. 
K- 1 2 public school licensure (or certification) in ESOL is avail- 
able through the M.A.T track in English for Speakers of Other 
Languages (ESOL). For more information, see the School of 
Education, Teaching and Health programs. 

Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved TESOL course work 

• Completion of a teaching portfolio compiled during course of 

study 

• An oral comprehensive examination taken after completion 
of all required course work and the teaching portfolio 

• Thesis or nonthesis option 
Course Requirements 

Core Courses (27 credit hours) 

• TESL-500 Principles of Linguistics (3) 

• TESL-501 English Language Teaching 1 (3) 

• TESL-502 English Language Teaching II (3) 

• TESL-503 Structure of English (3) 

• TESL-522 Language Acquisition (3) 
or 

TESL-523 Second Language Acquisition (3) 

• TESL-531 Language Assessment (3) 

• TESL-541 Teaching Grammar (3) 
or 

TESL-542 Teaching Pronunciation (3) 

• TESL-620 English Language Teaching III (3) (waived for 
students in the AU/Peace Corps program) 

• One of the following: 

ANTH-537 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
ANTH-544 Topics in Public Anthropology: 

Anthropology of Education (3) 
TESL-527 Cultural Issues in the ESL/EFL Classroom (3) 
or other approved course dealing with language and 

sociocultural issues 
Electives (9 credit hours) 

• Three courses as approved by the student's advisor from the 
following; 

ANTH-537 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
(if not taken in core) 



ANTH-544 Topics in Public Anthropology; 

Anthropology of Education (3) (if not taken in core) 
SOCY-645 Global and Multicultural Education (3) 
TESL-504 Language Analysis (3) 
TESL-522 Language Acquisition (3) (if not taken in core) 
TESL-523 Second Language Acquisition (3) 

(if not taken in core) 
TESL-524 Reading and Writing in the ESL/EFL 

Classroom (3) 
TESL-527 Culmral Issues in the ESL/EFL Classroom (3) 

(if not taken in core) 
TESL-528 Bilingual Education (3) 
TESL-531 Language Assessment (3) 
TESL-541 Teaching Grammar (3) (if not taken in core) 
TESL-542 Teaching Pronunciation (3) (if not taken in core) 
TESL-545 Curriculum and Materials Design (3) 
TESL-554 Technology for Language Learning 

and Teaching (3) 
TESL-560 TESOL Topics ( 1-3) 
TESL-691 Internship (1-6) 
TESL-693 Peace Corps Internship (6) (required for students 

in the AU/Peace Corps program) 

• Thesis option: completion of TESL-797 Master's Thesis 
Seminar (6) in lieu of 6 hours of electives listed above (the 
thesis option is not available to students in the AU/Peace 
Corps program) 

Nonthesis option: 9 elective credit hours 

Grades of B or better are required for all courses taken for the 

thesis or nonthesis option. 
Combined Bachelor's Degree and M.A. in TESOL 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. Bachelor's/master's students must complete at 
least 1 8 in-residencc credit hours at the graduate level after the 
bachelor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequen- 
tial enrollment in the two programs. 

This program enables qualified students to earn both a B.A. 
or B.S. in any major and an M.A. in TESOL (Teaching English 
to Speakers of Other Languages). Note: This program is not de- 
signed for K-12 ESOL licensure. 
Requirements 

• The standards for admission as defined by the relevant 
undergraduate teaching unit's requirements must first be 
satisfied. Undergraduates should apply for admission to the 
combined program by the end of the junior year. 
Undergraduates whose overall grade point average is 3.00 or 
higher will be considered for the combined program. 
Applications must be accompanied by two letters of 



1 78 College of Arts and Sciences 



academic reference and a statement of purpose. Students 
should discuss their interest in the program with the TESOL 
M.A. director before submitting a formal application. 

• All requirements for a B.A. or B.S. in any major at American 

University 

Undergraduate students may apply up to 9 credit hours of 
approved graduate-level course work to satisfy the 
requirements for both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in TESOL, including a 
minimum of 18 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. Students must finish the master's degree 
requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 



Certificate in TESOL (Teaching English to 
Spealiers of Other Languages) 

Admission to the Program 

A grade point average of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) is required. 
International suidents must demonstrate competence in English 
equivalent to a score of 600 or above in the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). 
Course Requirements (15 credit hours) 

• TESL-500 Principles of Linguistics (3) 

• TESL-501 English Language Teaching I (3) 

• TESL-502 English Language Teaching 11 (3) 

• Two approved TESOL courses 

Note: This program is not designed for K-12 ESOL licensure. 



Women's and Gender Studies 



Director Gay Young 

Faculty from other schools and departments of the university 
teach in the program. A list of the facult>' members of the 
Women's and Gender Studies Advisory Board and other pro- 
gram information is available at: 
www.american.edu/cas/wgs/ 

The Women's and Gender Studies (WGS) Program is an 

interdisciplinary' program encompassing feminist studies. 
masculinit>- suidies. and sexuality studies. The program is 
committed to a multicultural curriculum that sustains and 
integrates diverse perspectives. WGS courses emphasize 
participatory education in which student involvement, critical 
thinking, and personal insight are encouraged and made 
relevant in the learning process. Many faculty membei^ with 
national and intemational reputations for their scholarly work 
on women's gender sexuality issues regularly teach WGS 
courses as well as courses in other departments and prograins 
that count toward the WGS major and minor. 

Students who major or minor in WGS gain experience 
off-campus in the nation's capital through an internship place- 
ment in an organization or agency whose mission embraces 
some aspect of women's/gender sexuality studies. Students 
have access to powerfiil networks in Washington, DC that can 
give substantial support in career development; student interns 
are acti\ely sought by organizations focused on the arts, advo- 
cacy of all kinds, communication, employment and training is- 
sues, law and policy, reproductive rights and health, social 
research in a w ide range of fields, support services for suni- 
vors of \iolence and abuse, and U.S. politics. The program 
also encourages and facilitates students' study abroad. Majors 
and minors have expanded their understanding of 
women's/gender/sexuality in programs in Africa. Asia, Europe 
and Latin America. 

A degree in WGS leads to challenging careers in a wide 
spectrum of occupations. An undergraduate education in WGS 



also equips students with a range of skills which are highly val- 
ued in the twenty-first cenmry labor force. The curriculum also 
prepares students for graduate study in the fields of 
women's/gender sexuality studies or for advanced study m tradi- 
tional disciplines and professional fields. Moreover, at AU stu- 
dents can combine graduate-level coursework on 
women's/gender/sexuality theory and current issues/research in 
WGS with the program of study in a traditional discipline in fif- 
teen participating graduate programs leading to the M.A. or 
Ph.D. degree. 

B.A. in Women's and Gender Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a grade point average 
of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and the appro\al of the program direc- 
tor 

University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

Women's and gender studies majors are ad\ised to take 
STAT-202 Basic Statistics to fulfill the University 
Mathematics Requirement. 
General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence Irom each of 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39 credit hours with grades of C or better including at least 1 8 
credit hours at the 300 level or above 



Women's and Gender Studies 1 79 



Course Requirements 

• WGST-125 Gender in Society 4:1 (3) 

• WGST- 1 50 Women's Voices through 

Time 2:1 (3) 

• WGST-300 Feminist and Gender Theory (3) 

• WGST-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) or 
WGST-491 Internship in Women's and Gender Studies (3) 

• WGST-500 Current Issues and Research in Women's 

and Gender Studies (3) 

• One course on women and/or gender in multicultural 
perspective from the following: 

ANTH-2 1 5 Sex, Gender, and Culture 3:2 (3) 

JWST-320 Topics in Jewish Culture (3) (approved topic) 

SOCY-235 Women in the Third World 3:2 (3) 

WGST- 350 Interpreting Gender in Culture (3) (approved 

topic) 
or another course approved by the program director 
Area of Focus (12 credit hours) 

• 1 2 credit hours (9 of which must be at the 300 level or above) 
from one of three options; Arts and Humanities, Social 
Sciences, or an individually defined theme or issue 

Note: the same course may not be used to satisfy both the 
women and/or gender in multicultural perspective 
requirement (see above) and the Area of Focus requirement. 
Arts and Humanities 
AMST-334 Contemporary American Culture (3) (approved 

topics) 
AMST-341 Research on the City of Washington (1-6) 

(approved topics) 
ARTH-335 Twentieth Century Women Artists of the 

Americas (3) 
ARTH-520 Seminar in Art History (3) (approved topics) 
COMM-5 1 6 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) (approved 

topics) 
EDU-3 19 Children's Literature: Multicultural and 

International Approaches (3) 
EDU-565 Gender and Cultural Diversity in School (3) 
HIST-220 Women in America 4:2 (3) 
HIST-332 Contemporary Historical Studies (3) (approved 

topics) 
HIST-344 Topics in Jewish History (3) (approved topics) 
HIST-35S Women in America to 1850 (3) 
HlST-359 Women in Amenca, 1850 to Present (3) 
HIST-379 Topics in .Mrican American History (3) 

(approved topics) 
HIST-380 Topics in U.S. History (3) (approved topics) 
HIST-500 Suidies in History (3) (approved topics) 
JWST-320 Topics in Jewish Culture (3) (approved topics) 
LIT-3 10 Major Authors (3) (approved topics) 
LIT-332 Shakespeare Studies (3) (approved topics) 
LIT-370 Topics in Women and Gender Studies (3) 
PHlL-316 Feminist Philosophy (3) 



SPAN-559 Colloquium on Latin America (3) (taught in 

Spanish) (approved topics) 
WGST-350 Interpreting Gender in Culture (3) (approved 

topics) 
or other courses approved by the program director 
Social Sciences 

ANTH-2 15 Sex, Gender, and CulUire 3:2 (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture ( 3 ) 
ANTH-537 Topics in Language and Culture (3) (approved 

topics) 
ANTH-544 Topics in Public Anthropology (3) (approved 

topics) 
COMM-5 10 Women in Journalism (3) 
COMM-534 Race, Gender and the Media (3) 
ECON-374 Gender Roles in the Economy (3) 
ECON-574 Women in the Economy (3) 
GOVT-482 Women and Politics (3) 
GOVT-483 Women, Politics, and Public Policy (3) 
GOVT-484 Women and Political Leadership (3) 
GOVT-485 Topics in Women and Politics (1-4) 
GOVT-486 Feminist Political Theory (3) 
HFIT-245 Gender. Culture and Health 4:2 (3) 
HFIT-323 Issues in Women's Health (3) 
JLS-526 Domestic Violence (3) 
JLS-535 Gender and the Law (3) 
PSYC-320 Women and Mental Health (3) 
PSYC-430 Human Sexual Behavior (3) 
PSYC-545 Psychology of Sex Similarities and Differences (3) 
SlS-5 17 Gender, Human Rights, and Conflict (3) 
SIS-559 Selected Topics in Cross-National Studies (3) 

(approved topics) 
SOCY-205 The Family 4:2 (3) 
SOCY-235 Women in the Third World 3:2 (3) 
SOCY-354 White Privilege and Social Justice (3) 
SOCY-352 Women. Men and Social Change (3) 
SOCY-570 Sociology of Gender and Family (3) 
SPAN-356 Spanish Topics (3) (taught in Spanish) 

(approved topics) 
WGST-225 Gender, Politics and Power 4:2 (3) 
WGST-350 Interpreting Gender in Culture (3) (approved 

topics) 
or other courses approved by the program director 
Individually Defined Area of Focus 
An individually defined group of four courses (12 credit 
hours) centered on a particular theme or issue in women's and 
gender studies, with approval of the program director. 
Electives (9 credit hours) 

• Elective courses focused on women and/or gender studies, to 
make a total of 39 credit hours, fi-om a list of courses approved 
each semester by the program director 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors sUidents must complete at least 12 

credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 

courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 



180 College of Arts and Sciences 



Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements; Level 1 Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level 11 Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.eduyacademic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to 
earn both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its ac- 
celerated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate stu- 
dents may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required 
for the graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements 
for both degree programs. The department that oversees the 
graduate program the student enters will determine if the 
courses the undergraduate student completes will satisfy mas- 
ter's degree requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 



lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Women's and Gender Studies 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• WGST-125 Gender in Society 4:1 (3) 

• WGST-300 Feminist and Gender Theory (3) 

• WGST-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) or 
WGST-491 Internship in Women's and Gender Studies (3) 

• 9 credit hours of course work, 6 of which must be at the 300 
level or above, from a list of women's studies courses 
approved by the program director 

Consult the program director for each semester's approved 
course offerings in Women's and Gender Studies. 



Kogod School of Business 

• Administration and Faculty 

• Undergraduate Programs 

• Graduate Programs 



Dean Richard M. Durand 

Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Kathleen Getz 
Associate Dean tor Academic Programs Lawrence P. Ward 
Assistant Dean for Budget Administration Marianne Krell 

Director of Undergraduate Programs Jesse Boeding 
Undergraduate Academic Advisors 

Katie Ezei<iel, Tcia Robinson, Wick Stansbury 

Academic Assistant Derek Hewlett 

Assistant Director of Graduate Student Services 

Gretchen Anderson. Nirmala Femandes 

Director of Programming and Student Activities 

Allison Holcomb 

Student Activities Manager Tracy Landers 

Director of Admissions Shannon Demko 

Associate Director of Admissions Judith E. Byers 

Assistant Director of Admissions Nicholas Acrocco 

Enrollment Coordinator Katie Clain-Stefanelli 

Kogod Center for Career Development 

Employer Relations Meghan Hayde, Annie Genevish 

Career Advising Jennifer Murphy, Jaques Domenge, 

Amit Puri 

Director of the Center for Business Communication 

Bonnie Auslander 

Full-Time Faculty 

llniversity Professor Emeritus H.E. Striner 

University Professor H.K. Baker 

Professor Emeritus/a C.l. Bartfeld, D.R. Brenner, 

T.V. DiBacco, R.B. Edelman, R, Estes, GT. Ford, 

D.M. Khambata. RC. Kumar, A. LaSalle, DC. Martin, 

M.B. Mazis. J. Owens, W.H. Peters. M. Seldin, J.H. Sood 

Professor R.C. Anderson, E. Carmel. P. Chinloy, P. David, 

W.H. DeLonc, S.R. Holmberg, R. Lumsdaine, 

T. Mroczkowski, M.P. Sampson, E.A. Wasil, D.T. Williamson 

Associate Professor Emeritus/a GF. Bulmash, J.R. Bums, 

JR. Butts, S.H. Ivison, Jr., J. Kokus, Jr., R.L. Losey, 

A. C. Perry, R.M. Springer, Jr. 



Associate Professor A. Adhikari, B.J. Bird, M.A. Clark, 

F.L. DuBois, A. Duru, H. Elms, A. Espinosa, K.A. Getz, 

R. Gibson, S. A. Grier, M. Hastak, R. Hauswald, P.J. Jacoby, 

G Lee, G Martin, M.A. Mass, A. Mitra, J. Oetzel, 

L.E. Riddick, M.A. Robe, K.J. Rodgers, V. Selman, 

J.L. Swasy, R.B. Thompson, R.J. Volkema 

Assistant Professor W. Boland, V.G Bruno, R. Edgell. 

P. English, C. Goldberg, T. King, R.G Linowes, 

S. Marcum, S. Mazvancheryl, A. Omar, L. Shrenk, 

M. Westennan-Behaylo, 1. Yaveroglu, X. Zhang, Y. Zhang, 

Y Zhao 

Executive in Residence S. Bedford, S.R. Chidamber, 

L. Erickson, O. Ionic, J. Katkish, J.A. Klein, E. Lind.say, 

S. Mazvancheryl, S. N. Melander, G Nakshbendi. J. Pope, 

P. Rudolph, N. Sachs, R.Schroth, R. Sicina, M. Waldman 

Instructor C. Koerber 

Mission 

At American University's Kogod School of Business, our 
mission is to: 

• Prepare students to develop rewarding careers and become 
active global citizens who value integrity and who respect 
diverse view points and cultures. 

• Produce highly-engaged and well-prepared graduates to lead 
private, public, and non-profit organizations. 

• Conduct and publish high-quality scholarship for academic 
and professional audiences. 

Vision 

Kogod identifies, develops, and delivers high-quality, mar- 
ket drive programs to fiilfill the needs of our stakeholders, and 
is recognized as the school of choice for interdisciplinary edu- 
cation. 

For more information: www.kogod.american.edu 
Accreditation 

The Kogod School of Business is accredited by AACSB In- 
ternational, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of 
Business. 



181 



182 Kogod School of Business 



Departments and Centers 

The school is made up of six departments: Accounting and 
Taxation, Finance and Real Estate, International Business, 
Information Technology, Management, and Marketing. The 
Accounting Department oversees the instruction of all courses 
pertaining to accounting, taxation, and business law. The 
Department of Finance and Real Estate provides courses in 
finance, financial institutions, managerial economics, and real 
estate. The Department of International Business offers a 
variety of international courses that cover all of the business 
disciplines, including marketing, human resources 
management, finance, accounting, and trade. The Department 
of Infonnation Technology provides instruction in information 
technology, with particular emphasis on the global dimensions 
of technology, as well as production/operations management, 
statistics, strategies for infonnation technology development 
and use, and management of infonnation technology resources. 
The Management Department provides instruction in the areas 
of human resources, organizational behavior, entrepreneurship, 
strategy, business and corporate ethics, and global business citi- 
zenship. The Department of Marketing teaches courses in con- 
sumer behavior, research, advertising and promotion, 
marketing strategy development, and technology based market- 
ing. 

The Center for Information Technology and the Global 
Economy is a leader in the area of business issues at the inter- 
section of information technology and globalization. This is ac- 
complished by supporting scholarly research and dialogue with 
the practitioner community. 
K-LAB (Kogod Leadership and Applied Business) 

At Kogod. the belief is that education should extend beyond 
the classroom to include experiential learning that will enhance 
students' intellectual development, leadership ability, commu- 
nication skills, and professional self-confidence. To that end, a 
"lab" was created for business students, where activities that al- 
low students to learn valuable skills in real world settings are 
developed and supported. Information on programs as well as 
students clubs and organizations is available at 
kogod.american.edu/klab 
Undergraduate Student Organizations 

Accounting Club 

Alpha Kappa Psi (AKPsi) 

Amencan Marketing Association (AMA) 

Undergraduate Black MBA Associarion (UBMBAA) 

Undergraduate Business Asociation (UBA) 

Business, Technology, and Consulting 

Entrepreneurs Club 

Event Planning and Catering Club 

Kogod Finance Group (KFG) 

Hispanic Business Association (HBA) 

Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) 

Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) 
Graduate Student Organizations 

Graduate Business Association (GBA) 

Accounting Club 



Asian MBA Association 

Black MBA Association 

Entrepreneurs Club 

Hispanic MBA 

International Business Associafion (IBA) 

JD/MBA Club 

Kogod Capital 

Kogod Women in Business (KWIB) 

Marketing Club 

Net Impact 

Real Estate Club 

Society for Human Resource Management (SFIRM) 

Toastmasters U'ww.toastmasters.org 
Programs 

The Case Competition is one of the premier annual events 
hosted by the Kogod School of Business for graduate and un- 
dergraduate students. Case competitions are an excellent oppor- 
mnity for students to sharpen their communication skills, case 
analysis, presentation style, and problem-solving techniques. 
Students work in teams to analyze a business case and present 
their findings to area business leaders and alumni who serve as 
judges. 

The 1955 Club provides undergraduate students with 
meaningful opportunities to develop leadership skills through 
an annual leadership retreat. The organization emphasizes per- 
sonal responsibility, integrity, and professional development. 
The 1955 Club has two groups: Kogod Envoys serve as pro- 
gram ambassadors, and Peer Mentors provide support to first 
year student programming. 

The Washington Initiative is a service learning program 
that provides Kogod undergraduates with volunteer opportuni- 
ties to work on substantial business projects at local non-profits 
and charitable agencies while earning academic credit. The pro- 
gram challenges sUidents to examine their beliefs and values 
about business, ethics, and civic responsibility by applying 
business practices to the community's needs. 

The Road Scholars program exposes undergraduate stu- 
dents to the study of business and industry tlirough organized 
study and travel to a different destination each year. Through 
site visits, networking events, and workshops, students experi- 
ence diverse industries firsthand. 

The Making a Difference is Our Business program coor- 
dinates projects each semester to provide graduate students 
with the opportunity to work with fellow students on service 
projects 

Graduate students have the opportunity to be involved in the 
planning of the Kogod Golf Outing held each year to bring to- 
gether Kogod alumni, faculty, and students with area busi- 
nesses. 
Study Abroad 

At Kogod, all students are encouraged to take advantage of 
a range of international learning opportunities. These opportu- 
nities include traditional semester or year-long stiidy abroad 
programs and also global learning courses that allow stijdents to 
visit and experience foreign countries for shorter corporate 



Kogod School of Business 1 83 



study tours. Through AU Abroad, students can study and intern 
for a semester or a year in over 1 00 locales around the world. 
Some programs have language prerequisites and others have 
course prerequisites and in many locations students can take 
required business courses abroad. 

Kogod also has established several direct relationships with 
foreign partner institutions in key countries that complement 
AU Abroad. As well, Kogod offers individual Global Learning 
courses which provide students with international business ex- 
posure and networking opportunities with international compa- 
nies. Global Learning courses are organized 10-12 day study 



tours that take place in a foreign country. Regardless of the spe- 
cific type of program, students work closely with their Kogod 
academic advisor to identify and plan their experience abroad. 

Business Honorary Society 

The school recognizes the academic, professional, and per- 
sonal achievement of enrolled students through membership in 
Beta Gamma Sigma (BGS). BGS is the highest academic rec- 
ognition for outstanding students from an AACSB accredited 
undergraduate or graduate business program. Eligible students 
are invited to membership every spring. 



Undergraduate Programs 



The undergraduate business program provides students w ith 
a sound understanding of the major ftinctional areas of business 
while focusing on the communication, teamwork, and real 
world problem solving skills needed for successflil professional 
careers. KSB undergraduate programs include the Bachelor of 
Science in Business Administration (B.S.B.A). the Bachelor of 
Science in Business, Language & Culture Studies (B.L.C.), and 
the Bachelor of Science in Business and Music (B.A.M.). as 
well as minors in business administration, finance, information 
systems and technology, international business, marketing, and 
real estate.. 

The first two years of study focus on the five curricular areas 
of the General Education Program and additional course work 
to develop the necessary background knowledge, skills, and 
competency that apply to the study of business. The foundation 
work includes courses in college writing, mathematics (applied 
calculus and statistics), economics, and cross cultural commu- 
nication. The business core courses emphasize broad business 
fiinctions, global perspectives on commerce, and the essential 
role of technology in the marketplace. It also provides back- 
ground in the production and marketing of goods, the financing 
of products and organizations, and the management of people 
and enterprise. During the first semester, freshmen take the 
Kogod gateway course, KSB- 1 00 Business I.O., which pro- 
vides a unique, hands-on, and fiin introduction to the study of 
business. Business 1.0 uses a variety of different learning tools 
including small group discussions, team presentations, and lec- 
tures. In later semesters, students study accounting concepts 
along with the legal and ethical dimensions of decision-making 
that impact contemporary organizations. The program also fea- 
tures coursework in organizational behavior, business finance, 
international business, operations management, and business 
strategy. 

The undergraduate business programs have a liberal 
arts-based curriculum with a business core that provides a broad 
knowledge of business functions while emphasizing the global 
business environment. In addition to the business core, Kogod 
students have the option to choose a specialization and/or de- 
sign a double major, minor, or interdisciplinary curriculum. 

The objectives of the business core are: 



• develop students" intellectual curiosity and the ability to think 
creatively, reason logically and respect diverse ideas and 
people; 

. a global perspective on business operations and economics: 

• an understanding of how goods and services are produced 
and marketed; 

• a foundation in the concepts and applications of accounting, 
financial analysis, and business finance: 

• an understanding of basic management theory and 
organizational dynamics of the contemporary business 
enterprise; 

• an appreciation of the legal, ethical, and societal dimensions 
of business decision-making: and. 

• an ability to integrate learning across academic disciplines 
and to develop strategic decision-making skills. 

In addition, each student is expected to: 

• demonstrate professional competence in oral, written, and 
interpersonal communication skills in a business setting; 

• to understand how to use technology and analytical tools to 
improve efficiency, productivity, problem solving, and 
communication; and, 

• to understand the nature of group dynamics and how teams of 
diverse individuals work together to analyze and solve 
business problems. 

Several features of the program are important to these goals and 
distinguish it, including: 

• an emphasis on the development of an individual career 
strategy and the development of professional skill sets; 

« an integrated set of courses and co-curricular activities that 
develop managerial decision making skills; 

• extensive opportunities for study abroad, internships 
(domestic and international), and interaction with 
international and national agencies that affect domestic and 
intemational business practices; and, 

• a learning environment composed of skilled faculty and 
students from all o\er the world. 



1 84 Koeod School of Business 



Internship Program 

Qualified business majors are encouraged to participate in 
the Internship Program, which provides field experience in jobs 
related to their academic programs and career goals. The pro- 
gram enables students to make career decisions and prepare for 
the professional job market while earning degree credit. Posi- 
tions may be with businesses, local, state, or federal govern- 
ments or community, social service, or not-for-profit 
organizations. To earn academic credit, undergraduate students 
must have completed 12 credit hours in business including the 
300-level core course in the relevant Kogod department. The 
credit eamed in an internship course can be used only for a fi'ee 
business elective course, and cannot replace a core or area of 
specialization course. 

Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration (B.S.B.A.) 

Admission to the Program 

Freshman applicants should have demonstrated above aver- 
age performance in their college preparatory courses in second- 
ary school. Scores on the SAT or ACT should indicate that the 
applicant has the potential for success in a rigorous university 
degiee program. Due to the quantitative emphasis of the busi- 
ness administration curriculum, it is strongly recommended that 
applicants take the SAT II Math test for placement purposes. 

In addition to university requirements for transfer admis- 
sion, transfer applicants to KSB should have a minimum grade 
point average of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale). This also applies to sm- 
dents transferring from nondegree status at American Univer- 
sity. All B.S.B.A. transfer students are required to take 
MGMT-458 and at least 18 upper-level credit hours toward 
their major requirements in residence. Transfer credits for 
300-level and above business courses are subject to validation 
by the appropriate department chair and may be conditional on 
successful completion of a more advanced course at American 
University. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotal often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Curricular Area 4 should be fulfilled by ECON-100 
Macroeconomics and ECON-200 Microeconomics. 
Major Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours with a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.00 or higher 



Students must ensure that no more than 66 of the 120 credit 
hour graduation requirement are taken within the Kogod 
School of Business. 

IBUS-200 and FIN-200 are considered business courses and 
may not count toward the non-business course requirement 
even if they are taken for General Education credit. 

• Business core courses: 33 credit hours with grades of C or 
better (pass/fail grades are not permitted) 

• Suidents must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 to be eligible to enroll in business courses 

• Area of specialization: a minimum of 12 credit hours with 
grades of C or better (pass/fail grades are not pennitted) 
Students should declare an area of specialization before the 
end of their junior year All areas of specialization must be 
approved in advance by the Oifice of Academic Programs. 
Students must meet the following minimum standards of 
perfonnance prior to approval: 

minimum grade of C in MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus 1 and 
STAT-202 Basic Statistics 

minimum grade of C in ECON-100 Macroeconomics and 
ECON-200 Microeconomics 

• Free electives: 1 5 credit hours 

• At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for 
the B.S.B.A. must be eamed at American University 

Course Requirements 

Students are responsible for ftilfilling university and school 
requirements following a prescribed sequence. The academic 
advisors in the Kogod School's Office of Academic Programs 
must be consulted for counseling and advice when preparing 
class schedules. However, it is the sUident's responsibility to 
consult course descriptions to identify course prerequisites and 
when courses are offered. 

Non-Business Requirements 

• ECON- 1 00 Macroeconomics 4: 1 (3 ) 

• ECON-200 Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

• MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus I (4) 

or 

MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

Students needing to strengthen their quantitative skills should 
begin with MATH- 157 Finite Mathematics: Business. 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• 6 credit hours in foreign language or approved intemational 
or cross-cultural courses from the following: 

Courses from the School of Intemational Service (SIS) 
Courses from the Department of Language and Foreign 

Studies, College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) 
Curricular Area 3 (Global and Multiculmral Perspectives) 
courses may be used to meet this requirement, but the 6 credit 
hours must be in addition to those taken to fulfill the General 
Education Requirement 



Kogod School of Business 185 



AU Abroad courses (if not used to fulfill another 
requirement), international internships, or other approved 
study abroad programs 
Business Core Courses (33 credit hours) 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• ACCT-241 Principlesof Managerial Accounting (AT) (3) 

• FIN-365 Business Finance (AT) (3) 

• lBUS-300 Fundamentals of International 

Business (CAV) (3) 

• lTEC-200 The Edge of Information Technology (AT) (3) 

• ITEC-355 Production/Operations Management (AT/C) (3) 

• KSB- 100 Business 1.0(3) 

(students not taking KSB- 1 00 in their freshman year take a 
300- or 400-level business course in its place) 

• MGMT-201 Global Corporate Citizenship (O) (3) 

• MGMT-353 Principles of Organizational Theory, 

Behavior and Management (T) (3) 

• MGMT-458 Business Policy and Strategy (C/O/TAV) (3) 

• MKTG-300 Principles of Marketing (W) (3) 

AT = analytical tool emphasis; provides a strong foundation 
in business analytical software 

C = case analysis emphasis; provides growth opportunities 
for students to evaluate cases 

O = oral communication emphasis; assists in the 
development of oral presentation skills 
T = teamwork emphasis; focuses on teamwork and the 
importance of interpersonal relationships and 
communication 

W = written communication emphasis; develops business 
writing skills, written assignments account for a significant 
part of the course grade 
Area of Specialization 

Business majors select a specialization from the approved 
specializations listed below or design a custom or interdisci- 
plinary specialization with the approval of their Kogod advisor. 
Specializations must include a minimum of 12 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above. Students who choose a second area of 
specialization must also take a minimum of 12 credit hours in 
the second specialization. 

Students who choose a specialization in International Busi- 
ness, Intemational Finance, International Management, or In- 
ternational Marketing must satisfy a global experience 
requirement. This can be met either through completion of an 
approved study abroad program, an intemational internship, or 
successful completion of a comparable American University 
global immersion course. Exceptions to this requirement may 
be granted on a case by case basis by the Department of Intema- 
tional Business. Intemational students are exempt from this re- 
quirement. 

Accounting (12 credit hours) 

• ACCT-340 Intermediate Accounting I (3) 



• ACCT-341 Intermediate Accounting n (3) 

• ACCT-345 Cost Accounting and Strategic Cost 

Management (3) 

• ACCT-443 Federal Income Taxation of Individuals and 

Businesses (3) 
Entrepreneurshlp(12 credit hours) 

• MGMT-382 Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3) 

• MGMT-383 Entrepreneurship Business Plans: Creating, 

Building, and Managing Ventures (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

MGMT-360 Nonprofit and Social Entrepreneurship (3) 
MGMT-361 Global Entrepreneurship and Micro 

Enterprises (3) 
MGMT-385 Entrepreneurship Financing and Legal 

Strategies (3) 
MGMT-409 Leading High Performance Teams (3) 
or 

MGMT-465 Negotiation (3) 
Finance (12 credit hours) 

• 1 2 credit hours from the following: 
FrN-464 Financial Markets and Institutions (3) 
FrN-465 Derivative Securities (3) 

FrN-468 Intermediate Corporate Finance (3) 
FrN-469 Investment Analysis (3) 
FrN-474 Real Estate Finance and Economics (3) 
IBUS-302 Intemational Finance (3) 
Information Systems and Technology (12 credit hours) 

• ITEC-455 Requirements Analysis (3) 

• ITEC-470 Databases, Data Mining, and Knowledge 

Management (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ITEC-333 Topics in Information Technology (3) 
ITEC-334 Computer Programming in the Web Era (3) 
ITEC-350 Corporate Information Strategy and 

Management (3) 
ITEC-454 Fundamentals of Electronic Commerce (3) 
International Business (12 credit hours) 

• IBUS-301 hitemational Marketing (3) 

• IBUS-302 Intemational Finance (3) 

• IBUS-402 Intemational Human Resources Management (3) 

• one of tlie foil wing: 

IBUS-303 Learning From Global Enterprise Failure (3) 
IBUS-408 Export-Import Management (3) 
IBUS-404 Intemational Accounting and Financial 

Consultmg (3) 
International Finance (12 credit hours) 

• FIN-464 Financial Markets and Institutions (3) 

• FIN-468 Intermediate Corporate Finance (3) 

• IBUS-302 Intemational Finance (3) 



186 Kogod School of Business 



• IBUS-404 International Accounting and Financial 

Consulting (3) 
International Management (12 credit hours) 

• IBUS-401 Cultural Environment of International 

Business (3) 

• IBUS-402 International Human Resource Management (3) 

• lTEC-454 Fundamentals of Electronic Commerce (3) 

• MGMT-386 Entrepreneurship (3) 

International Marketing (12 credit hours) 

• IBUS-301 International Marketing (3) 

• IBUS-408 Export/Import Management (3) 

• MKTG-301 Consumer Behavior (3) 

• MKTG-302 Marketing Research (3) 

Management (12 credit hours) 

• MGMT-381 Managing Human Capital (3) 

• MGMT-409 Leading High Performance Teams (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

IBUS-402 International Human Resource Management (3) 
MGMT-382 Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3) 

or 

MGMT-360 Nonprofit and Social Entrepreneurship (3) 
MGMT-465 Negotiation (3) 
MGMT-484 Consulting and Project Management (3) 

Marketing (12 credit hours) 

• MKTG-301 Consumer Behavior (3) 

• MKTG-302 Marketing Research (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
IBUS-301 Intemational Marketing (3) 
MKTG-3 1 1 Internet Marketing (3) 
MKTG-402 Marketing Strategy (3) 

MKTG-41 1 Advertising and Marketing Communications 

Management (3) 
MKTG-41 2 Advertising and Promotion Campaigns (3) 
MKTG-421 Brand Management (3) 
MKTG-431 Direct Response Marketing (3) 
Real Estate (12 credit hours) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

FIN-373 Real Estate Principles and Transactions (3) 

FrN-474 Real Estate Finance and Economics (3) 

FIN -475 Real Estate Management and Development (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

FrN-464 Financial Markets and Institutions (3) 

FIN-465 Derivative Securities (3) 

FrN-469 Investment Analysis (3) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 1 2 advanced-level Honors 



courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.eduj'academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will detemiine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first 
enrollment in the master's program. 

Bachelor of Science in Business, 
Language & Culture Studies (B.L.C.) 

The B. S. in Business, Language & Culmre Studies (B.L.C) 
is designed for students with a passion for business and a com- 
plementary enthusiasm for a foreign language. Students choose 
one of four language tracks (French, German, Russian, or Span- 
ish) when entering the program, complete the business core, 
and spend one semester abroad taking courses in their language 
track. Upon completion of this interdisciplinary program, stu- 
dents will be prepared to take the American Council on the 
Teaching of a Foreign Language (ACTFL) oral proficiency in- 
terview and qualify for a regional fluency certificate (i.e. 
French Chamber of Commerce Certificate). Students with a 
solid academic foundation in business and a strong proficiency 
in a foreign language will be highly competitive in the global 
marketplace. 
Admission to the Program 

Freshman applicants should have demonstrated above aver- 
age perfomiance in their college preparatory courses in second- 
ary school. Scores on the SAT or ACT should indicate that the 
applicant has the potential for success in a rigorous university 
degree program. Due to the quantitative emphasis of the busi- 
ness administration curriculum, it is strongly recommended that 
applicants take the SATII Math test for placement purposes. 

In addition to university requirements for transfer admis- 
sion, transfer applicants to KSB should have a minimum grade 
point average of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale). This also applies to stu- 
dents transferring from nondegree status at American Univer- 
sity. All B.L.C. transfer students are required to take 
MGMT-458 and at least 18 upper-level credit hours toward 



Kogod School of Business 1 87 



their major requirements in residence. Transfer credits for 
300-level and above business courses are subject to validation 
by the appropriate department chair and may be conditional on 
successfiil completion of a more advanced course at American 
University. 

Due to language proficiency expectations, it is strongly rec- 
ommended that students enter the program at the intermediate 
level of language study. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Curricular Area 1 should be fulfilled by ANTH-225 
Language and Human Experience with grades of C or better 
(pass/fail grades are not permitted) and an appropriately 
corresponding foundation course. 

Curricular Area 4 should be fulfilled by ECON-IOO 
Macroeconomics and ECON-200 Microeconomics with 
grades of C or better (pass/fail grades are not permitted). 

Language Traclis 

French, German, Russian, or Spanish 

Major Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours with a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.00 or higher 

Students must ensure that no more than 66 of the 1 20 credit 
hour graduation requirement are taken within the Kogod 
School of Business. 

IBUS-200 and FlN-200 are considered business courses and 
may not count toward the non-business course requirement 
even if they are taken for General Education credit. 
Students must complete 45 of the last 60 credit hours on 
campus, with a minimum of 15 credit hours of upper-level 
courses 

• A total of 82 credit hours with grades of C or better for the 
major requirements 

• Business core courses: 33 credit hours with grades of C or 
better (pass/fail grades are not permitted) 

• 32 foreign language credit hours with grades of C or better 
(pass/fail grades arc not permitted). Students declare a 
language track (French. German, Spanish or Russian) upon 
entenng the program. 

24 credit hours in the major language at the 300 level or above 
At least 6 credits taken at AU or abroad must be business 
topics in the foreign language, all business courses in a 



language must be taken at an AACSB institution or Kogod 

approved institution 

At least 12 credits must be taken abroad in the foreign 

language 

• Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 to be eligible to enroll in business or language 
courses 

• At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for 
the B.L.C must be earned at American University. 

• Study Abroad Requirement: every B.L.C. student must sUidy 
abroad and take a minimum of 1 2 credits in their language 
track. Students should consult the AU Abroad website and 
work closely with their advisor to identify suitable options 
and timelines for their abroad experience. 

Course Requirements 

Students are responsible for fulfilling university and school 
requirements following a prescribed sequence. Students work 
closely with their academic advisor in Kogod and their faculty 
advisor in the Department of Language and Foreign Studies in 
the College of Arts and Sciences to ensure appropriate course 
sequencing. However, it is the student's responsibility to consult 
course descriptions to identify course prerequisites and when 
courses are offered. 

General Requirements (17 credit hours) 

Students must complete the following courses with a grade 
of C or better: 

• ANTH-225 Language and Human Experience (3) 

• ECON-IOO Macroeconomics (3) 

• ECON-200 Microeconomics (3) 

• MATH-2 1 1 Applied Calculus 1 (4) 

or 
MATH 221 Calculus I (4) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

Business Core Courses (33 credit hours) 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• ACCT-241 Principles of Managerial Accounting (AT) (3) 

• FIN-365 Business Finance (AT) (3) 

• IBUS-300 Fundamentals of International Business (CAV) (3) 

• ITEC-200 The Edge of Information Technology (AT) (3) 

• ITEC-355 Production/Operations Management (AT/C) (3) 

• KSB- 100 Business 1.0(3) 

(students not taking KSB- 1 00 in their freshman year take a 
300- or 400-level course in its place) 

• MGMT-201 Global Corporate Citizenship (O) (3) 

• MGMT-353 Principlesof Organizational Theory, 

Behavior and Management (T) (3) 

• MGMT-458 Business Policy and Strategy (C/O/TAV) (3) 

• MKTG-300 Principles of Marketing (W) (3 ) 

AT = analytical tool emphasis; provides a strong foundation 
in business analytical software 



188 Kogod School of Business 



C = case analysis emphasis; provides growth opportunities 
for students to evaluate cases 

O = oral communication emphasis; assists in the 
development of oral presentation skills 
T = teamwork emphasis; focuses on teamwork and the 
importance of interpersonal relationships and 
communication 

W = written communication emphasis; develops business 
writing skills, written assignments account for a significant 
part of the course grade 
Language Core Requirements (32 credit liours) 

• 24 credit hours in the major language (French, German. 
Russian, or Spanish) at the 300 level or above 

• At least 6 credits taken at AU or abroad must be business 
topics in the foreign language (all business courses in a 
language must be taken at an AACSB institution or Kogod 
approved institution). 

• At least 12 credits must be taken abroad in the foreign 
language 

French 

• FREN-322 Advanced French I (3) (may be replaced by 
other 400-level courses if warranted by language 
proficiency) 

• FREN-323 Advanced French II (3) (may be replaced by 
other 400-level courses if warranted by language 
proficiency) 

• FREN-43 1 Civilisation Francaise I (3) 

• FREN-432 Civilisation Francaise 11 (3) 

• Remaining credit hours at the 400 level or above in French 
studies 

German 

• GERM-332 German Conversation and Composition I (3) 
(may be replaced by other 300- or 400-level courses if 
warranted by language proficiency) 

• GERM-333 German Conversation and Composition II (3) 
(may be replaced by other 300- or 400-level courses if 
warranted by language proficiency) 

• GERM-438 German Civilization 1 (3) 

• GERM-439 German Civilization II (3) 

• Remaining credit hours at the 300-400-level independent 
study projects, internships, and topic courses in German 
studies 

Russian 

• RUSS-342 Russian Conversation and Composition I (3) 

• RUSS-343 Russian Conversation and Composition II (3) 

• RUSS^44I Russian Media and Political Translation (3) 

• Remaining credit hours at the 300-400-level independent 
study projects, internships, and topic courses in Russian 
studies 



Spanish 

• SR\N-352 Spanish Conversation and Composition 1 (3) 
(may be replaced by other 300- or 400- level courses if 
warranted by language proficiency) 

• SPAN-353 Spanish Conversation and Composition 11 (3) 
(may be replaced by other 300- or 400- level courses if 
warranted by language proficiency) 

• SPAN-357 Introduction to Latin American Literature (3) 

• SPAN-450 Spanish Civilization I: Spain (3) 

• SPAN-491 Internship: Spanish (2-6) 

• Remaining credit hours chosen from Spanish topics 
colloquium, and literature courses 

University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-leveI and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to v^rww.american.eduy'academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to cam 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate sUident completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must fmish the master's 
degree requirements within three years fi^om the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Bachelor of Science in Business and 
Music (B.A.M.) . 

The B. S. in Business and Music (B.A.M.) is designed for 
students with a passion for music and a complementary enthusi- 
asm for business. Students complete the AACSB-accredited 
core business program together with the NASM-accredited 
core music program under the guidance of Department of Per- 
forming Arts faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences. Stu- 
dents leverage their academic experience in a series of 
internships and on completion of the program are candidates for 
positions in the for-profit music industry. 



Kogod School of Business 189 



Admission to the Program 

Freshman applicants should have demonstrated above aver- 
age performance in their college preparatory courses in second- 
ary school. Scores on the SAT or ACT should indicate that the 
applicant has the potential for success in a rigorous university 
degree program. Due to the quantitative emphasis of the busi- 
ness administration cumculuin, it is strongly recommended that 
applicants take the SATll Math test for placement purposes. 

In addition to university requirements for transfer admis- 
sion, transfer applicants to KSB should have a minimum grade 
point average of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale). This also applies to stu- 
dents transferring from nondegrec status at American Univer- 
sity. All B.A.M. transfer students are required to take 
MriMT-458 and at least 18 upper-level credit hours toward 
their major requirements in residence. Transfer credits for 
300-level and above business courses are subject to validation 
by the appropriate department chair and may be conditional on 
successfi.ll completion of a more advanced course at American 
University. 

University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence Irom each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Curricular Area 4 should be fulfilled by ECON-100 
Macroeconomics and ECON-200 Microeconomics with 
grades of C or better (pass/fail grades are not pemiitted). 
Major Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours with a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.00 or higher 

Students must ensure that no more than 66 of the 1 20 credit 
hour graduation requirement are taken within the Kogod 
School of Business. 

IBUS-200 and FlN-200 are considered business courses and 
may not count toward the non-business course requirement 
even if they are taken for General Education credit. 
Students must complete 45 of the last 60 credit hours on 
campus, with a minimum of 15 credit hours of uppei-le\el 
courses 

• A total of 86 credit hours with grades of C or better for the 
major requirements 

• 36 credit hours in business with grades of C or better 
(pass/fail grades are not pemiitted) including 33 business core 
courses and 3 credit hours of career development (KSB-298) 
and internship (MGMT-391) 



• 36 credit hours in music with grades of C or better (pass/fail 
grades are not permitted) 

• Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 to be eligible to enroll in business or music 
courses 

• At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for 
the B.A.M must be earned at American University. 

Course Requirements 

Students are responsible for fiilfilling university and school 
requirements following a prescribed sequence. Students work 
closely with their academic advisor in Kogod and their Music 
Program faculty advisor in the Department of Performing Arts 
to ensure appropriate course sequencing. However, it is the stu- 
dent's responsibility to consult course descriptions to identify 
course prerequisites and when courses are ofll'cred. 

General Requirements (14 credit hours) 

Smdents must complete the following courses with a grade 
of C or better: 

• ECON-100 Macroeconomics (3) 

• ECON-200 Microeconomics (3) 

• MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus 1 (4) 

or 
MATH 22 1 Calculus 1(4) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

Business Core Courses (36 credit hours) 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• ACCT-241 Principlcsof Managerial Accounting (AT) (3) 

• FrN-365 Business Finance (AT) (3) 

• lBUS-300 Fundamentals of International Business (CAV) (3) 

• lTEC-200 The Edge of Information Technology (AT) (3) 

• lTEC-355 Production/Operations Management (AT/C) (3) 

• KSB- 100 Business 1.0(3) 

( students not taking KSB- 1 00 in their freshman year take a 
300- or 400-level course in its place) 

• KSB-200 Basic Career Exploration and Development ( I ) 

• MGMT-201 Global Corporate Citizenship (O) (3) 

• MGMT-353 Pnnciples of Organizational Theory, 

Behavior and Management (T) (3) 

• MGMT-458 Business Policy and Strategy (C/O/TAV) (3) 

• MGMT-391 Internship (2) 

• MKTG-300 Principles of Marketing (W) (3) 

AT = analytical tool emphasis; provides a strong foundation 

in business analytical software 

C = case analysis emphasis; provides growth opportunities 

for students to evaluate cases 

O = oral communication emphasis; assists in the 

development of oral presentation skills 

T = teamwork emphasis; focuses on teamwork and the 

importance of interpersonal relationships and 

communication 



190 Kogod School of Business 



W = written communication emphasis; develops business 
writing skills, written assignments account for a significant 
part of the course grade 
Music Core Requirements (36 credit hours) 

• PERF-124 Harmony 1(3) 

• PERF-125 Harmony 11 (3) 

• PERF-227 Musicianship 1 (3) 

• PERF-228 Musicianship n (3) 

• PERP-322 History of Music 1: From Antiquity to 1700 (3) 

• PERF-323 History of Music II: From 1700 to the 

Present (3) 

• PERF-444 Business and Music Capstone (2) 

• PERF-491 Internship (1) 

• 6 credit hours of approved PERF music courses at the 300 
level or above 

• 9 credit hours in approved applied music and ensemble 
courses 

Universitj' Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level 11 Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will detemiine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is eamed and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Business Administration 

The minor is designed to provide coverage of the common 
body of knowledge in business administration for non-business 
majors. 



Minor Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better, a minimum of 9 
credit hours at the 300-level or above, and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• FrN-365 Business Finance (3) (prerequisite: ACCT-240, 
ECON-200 Microeconomics and STAT-202 Basic 
Statistics) 

• MGMT-353 Principles of Organizational Theory, 

Behavior and Management (3) 

• MKTG-250 Fundamentals of Marketing and Business for 

Communications (3) 
or 

MKTG-300 Principles of Marketing (3) (prerequisite: 
ECON-200 Microeconomics) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

ACCT-241 Principles of Managerial Accounting (3) 
lBUS-300 Fundamentals of International Business (3) 
lTEC-355 Production/Operations Management (3) 
(prerequisite: ACCT-241, ECON-200 
Microeconomics, MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus I or 
MATH-221 Calculus 1, and STAT-202 Basic Statistics) 
MGMT-201 Global Corporate Citizenship (3) 

Minor in Finance 

The minor in finance provides non-business majors with an 
understanding of key finance concepts. Through case studies 
and company projects, students leam how to apply these con- 
cepts to real-life simations. Students also gain insight on finan- 
cial markets and their wide-ranging impacts. 

Minor Requirements 

• 1 9-22 credit hours with grades of C or better, a minimum of 9 
credit hours at the 300-level or above, and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• ECON- 100 Macroeconomics 4:1 (3) and 
ECON-200 Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

or 

an approved economics course covering the fundamentals of 
business economics (3) 

• FrN-365 Business Finance (3) 

• STAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

FIN-464 Financial Markets and Institutions (3) 
FIN-465 Derivative Securities (3) 
FIN^69 Investment Analysis (3) 
IBUS-302 International Finance (3) 



Kogod School of Business 1 9 1 



Minor in Information Systems and 
Teclinology 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better, a minimum of 9 
credit hours at the 300-ievel or above, and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours from the following: 

ITEC-200 The Edge of Information Technology (3) 
lTEC-333 Topics in Information Technology (3) 
lTEC-334 Computer Programming in the Web Era (3) 
lTEC-350 Corporate Information Strategy and 

Management (3) 
ITEC-454 Fundamentals of Electronic Commerce (3) 
ITEC-455 Requirements Analysis (3) 
ITEC-470 Databases, Data Mining, and Knowledge 

Management (3) 

Minor in International Business 

• 18 credit hours with grades of C or better, a minimum of 9 
credit hours at the 300-level or above, and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• IBUS-300 Fundamentals of International Business (3) 

• IBUS-401 Cultural Environment of International 

Business (3) 

• MKTG-250 Fundamentals of Marketing and Business for 

Communications (3) 
or 
MK.TG-300 Principles of Marketing (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 
ECON-370 International Economics (3) 
IBUS-244 International Management Practices (2-3) 
IBUS-301 International Marketing (3) 
IBUS-302 International Finance (3) 

IBUS-303 Learning From Global Enterprise Failure (3) 
IBUS-402 International Human Resource Management (3) 
IBUS-404 International Accounting and Financial 

Consulting (3) 
IBUS-408 Exportyimport Management (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 
SIS-32I International Law (3) 
SIS-325 International Organization (3) 
SIS-337 International Development (3) 
SIS-338 Environment and Development (3) 

Minor in Marketing 

The minor in marketing provides non-business majors with 
a thorough understanding of the fundamental concepts of mar- 
keting and how to apply these concepts through case studies 



and company and non-profit organization projects. Students 
also gain an understanding of consumer behavior, along with 
the knowledge and tools needed to coordinate marketing ele- 
ments into integrated campaigns. 

Minor Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better, a minimum of 9 
credit hours at the 300-level or above, and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• MKTG-250 Fundamentals of Marketing and Business for 

Communications (3) 
or 
MKTG-300 Principles of Marketing (3) 

• 1 5 credit hours from the following: 
MKTG-30I Consumer Behavior (3) 
MKTG-302 Marketing Research (3) 
MKTG-3 1 1 Internet Marketing (3) 
MKTG-391 Internship in Marketing (3) 

MKTG-4 1 1 Advertising and Marketing Communications 

Management (3) 
MKTG-4 1 2 Advertising and Promotion Campaigns (3) 
MKTG-421 Brand Management (3) 
MKTG-431 Direct Response Marketing (3) 

Minor in Real Estate 

The real estate minor is designed to provide non-business 
majors with a thorough understanding of real estate principles 
and enable them to apply them to actual circumstances using 
case studies and company projects, as well as to understand real 
estate markets and the factors influencing their behavior. 

Minor Requirements 

• 18 credit hours with grades of C or better, a minimum of 9 
credit hours at the 300-level or above, and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• ECON-IOO Macroeconomics 4:1 (3) 

or 
ECON-200 Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

• FrN-365 Business Finance (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

FIN-373 Real Estate Principles and Transactions (3) 
FIN-474 Real Estate Finance and Economics (3) 
FIN-475 Real Estate Management and Development (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 

FIN-464 Financial Markets and Institutions (3) 
FrN-465 Derivative Securities (3) 
FIN-469 Investment Analysis (3) 



192 Kogod School of Business 



Graduate Programs 



Internship for Credit Program 

Graduate students may cam elective credit for internships 
that are related to their academic program and their career 
goals. These positions are full or part time and are usually with 
businesses, state or federal governments, or not-for-profit orga- 
nizations. Students who elect to do an internship for credit will 
be assigned a faculty member who will guide and evaluate the 
students' learning process. 

To be eligible for an internship for credit, students must be 
in good academic standing (at least a 3.0 GPA) and have com- 
pleted 12 credit hours of the required core course work. Before 
students apply they must obtain appropriate signatures from 
their academic advisor (international students also need ap- 
proval fi-om International Student & Scholar Services), and pro- 
vide a position description from the employer. All internships 
are reviewed and approved for credit by the faculty advisor. 
Students are required to demonstrate what they have learned 
through written papers or reports. Specific requirements are set 
by the faculty in the syllabus. Students doing an internship for 
credit must work a minimum of 10 hours per week for at least 
12 weeks. Students register after they are selected for a position 
by an employer and have all the necessary forms completed. A 
maximum of 3 internship credit hours, taken as elective credit, 
may be applied toward a student's degree program require- 
ments. Shidents will be graded on a pass/fail basis. 

Master of Business Administration 
(M.B.A.) 

The goal of the M.B.A. program is to develop practical busi- 
ness managers able to succeed in the complex arena of global 
organizations. Specifically, students will: 
. Develop a solid foundation in each of the ftinctional areas of 

business, including 
. accounting and financial analysis 

• .production and marketing of goods and services 

• management of people and organizations 
. information and technology management 

. Understand critical interrelationships and linkages necessary 
for developing global business strategy, including 

• strategies and operational issues 
. ftinctional disciplines 

• "hard" and "soft" skills 

• Appreciate the environment in which business operates, 
including economic, legal, ethical, and societal dimensions 

In addition, each student is expected to: 

. demonstrate professional competence in oral, written, and 

interpersonal communication skills 
. develop competency in the use of productivity tools and 

software to improve the quality and efficiency of decision 

making 



• understand the nature of group dynamics and lead diverse 
work teams 

The M.B.A. program contains within its required curricu- 
lum the business perspectives and core areas required by 
AACSB. The M.B.A. is a broad, general management program 
with the opportunity for greater depth in a business discipline or 
ftinctional area. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must have earned a satis- 
factory score on the Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT) and a satisfactory grade point average for the last 60 
hours of academic work from a Council on Postsecondary Ac- 
creditation (COPA) regionally-accredited institution. 

Applicants whose first language is not English are also re- 
quired to take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Lan- 
guage) and demonstrate English language proficiency. 

Full-time students are admitted to the M.B.A. program start- 
ing in August only. Part-time students are admitted in August or 
January. Full-time students generally take between 1 2 and 1 5 
credit hours per semester, which allows for completion of the 
degree in four semesters. Part-time saidents generally take be- 
tween 6 and 7.5 credit hours per semester, which allows for 
completion of the degree in eight semesters. Some of the core 
part-time M.B.A. courses are offered in a hybrid fomiat, with 
face-to-face classes on campus, virtual classes that take place 
synchronously over the Internet, and online self study activities. 
Degree Requirements 

• 52 credit hours of approved graduate course work including 
27 credits of integrated core courses and 24 credits in one or 
two career tracks and advanced electives. 

A minimum of 30 credits taken in residence from the Kogod 

School of Business is required for the M.B.A. 

Up to 9 credit hours of course work may be waived from 

ACCT-607, FIN-605, ITEC-614 and ITEC-615 if students 

have taken equivalent course work at the undergraduate level 

in the past seven years, received grades of B or better, and 

pass an examination for each course waived. Any waived 

courses are waived with replacement of an equal number of 

credits of other course work. 

Up to 9 credit hours earned at another AACSB-accredited 

M.B.A. program may be transferred and applied to the Kogod 

M.B.A. requirements. 

M.B.A. students may take a maximum of 6 credit hours in 

500-level courses or graduate courses which meet 

concurrently with undergraduate courses. 

M.B.A. students may take a maximum of 6 credits with a 

pass/fail grade. Pass/fail grades are not permitted for any core 

requirements, for a studenfs career track courses, or for 

KSB-688 Applied Business Practicum. A pass grade is 

equivalent to B or higher; a fail grade is equivalent to B- or 

lower. 



Kogod School of Business 1 93 



• Intensive writing requirement: 
KSB-602andKSB-610 

These courses must be tai<en in residence at Kogod with a 
grade of B or higher 

• Worlcshop requirement: KSB-071 and KSB-072 

• Orientation requirement: All students are required to 
participate in the MBA Orientation Program during the week 
prior to the start of classes in their first semester. 

Course Requirements 
Core (28 credit hours) 

• ACCT-607 Accounting Concepts and Applications (3) 

• FIN-605 Managerial Economics (3) 

• FIN-614 Financial Management (3) 

• IBUS-610 International Business Analysis (1.5) 

• ITEC-610 Applied Managerial Statistics (3) 

• ITEC-61 7 Information and Technology ( 1 .5) 

• ITEC-61 8 Applied Production and Operations 

Management (1.5) 

• KSB-071 Career Management I (0) 

• KSB-072 Career Management II (0) 

• KSB-602 Strategic Decision-Making in a Global 

Environment (3) 

• KSB-610 Strategic Thinking (1.5) 

• KSB-655 Business Communications ( 1 ) 

• MGMT-612 Legal, Ethical and Social Issues in 

Business ( 1 .5) 

• MGMT-613 Managing People in Organizations (1.5) 

• MKTG-612 Marketing Management (3) 

MBA Career Tracks and Electives (24 credit hours) 

• A minimum of 9 credit hours in a career track 

• Remaining credit hours in a second career track or electives 
A maximum of 3 credit hours may be taken in an internship 
for elective credit (see internship for credit program, above) 
Topics courses require approval from the Office of Academic 
Programs. 

Accounting (9 credit hours) 

The Accounting career track offers a breadth of knowledge 
in accounting and management. Students learn a wide array of 
techniques that contribute to careers in consulting, finance, and 
general management and upon completion of the program will 
possess the basic conceptual knowledge of accounting as well 
as insights into the nature, limitations, interpretations, and uses 
of financial information and technology necessary for corporate 
valuation and management. 

• 9 credit hours chosen in consultation with the department 
chair from the following: 

ACCT-547 Advanced Financial Reporting (3) 
ACCT-549 Contemporary Assurance and Audit Services (3) 
ACCT-550 Accounting Infonnation Systems (3) 
ACCT-560 Governmental and Not-for Profit Accounting (3) 



ACCT-604 Tax Planning for Individuals and Business 

Enterprises (3) 
ACCT-608 Cost Accounting (3) 
ACCT-64I Corporate Financial Reporting (3) 
ACCT-670 International Accounting (3) 
ACCT-677 Financial Statement Analysis (3) 
ACCT-725 Modem Management Control Systems (3) 
ACCT-760 Advanced Auditing and Professional Practice (3) 
ACCT-770 Current Topics in Accounting ( 1 .5-3) 
ACCT-780 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 
Graduate taxation courses: 
ACCT-630 Legislative and Judicial Foundations of 

Income Tax (3) 
ACCT-631 Tax Research and Procedure (3) 
ACCT-740 Taxation of Corporations (3) 
ACCT-741 State and Local Taxation (3) 
ACCT-742 Special Tax Topics (3) 
ACCT-743 International Taxation (3) 
ACCT-745 Employee Benefit Tax Planning (3) 
ACCT-746 Taxation of Real Estate Transactions (3) 
ACCT-747 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities (3) 
ACCT-750 Tax Policy (3) 
ACCT-751 Seminar in Business Tax Planning (3) 
ACCT-752 Seminar in Family Financial Planning (3) 
Asset Management (13.5 credit hours) 

In this track students leam to value a wide range of individ- 
ual assets and to form and manage portfolios of these assets. 
Students with this training will be well equipped to work as an 
investment analyst or trader for an investment house, muuial 
fund, retirement fund, insurance company, or trading fimi. 

• FIN-672 Investment Analysis and Portfolio 

Management (3) 

• FrN-674 Derivatives and Risk Management (3) 

• FIN-677 Financial Statement Analysis (3) 

• FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate ( 1 .5-3) 

• 3 credit hours from one of the following; 
Real Estate and/or Venture Capital 

ACCT-685 Topics in Accounting (1.5) 
FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate (1.5-3) 
FIN-730 Real Estate and Principles and Investment (3) 
FIN-734 Real Estate Development (3) 
STAT-522 Time Series Analysis (3) 
Money Management 

ACCT-641 Corporate Financial Reporting (3) 

ACCT-685 Topics in Accounting (1.5) 

FIN-673 Corporate Valuation and Financial Strategy (3) 

FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate ( 1 .5-3) 

IBUS-700 International Finance (3) 

STAT-522 Time Series Analysis (3) 



194 Kogod School of Business 



Consulting ( 1 2 credit hours) 

Provides students with some of the fiandamental training, 
frameworks, and techniques used by leading consulting firms 
and the opportunity' to work with practicing consultants in the 
classroom. Students specialize in one of three consulting areas: 
information technology, international business, or management 
consulting. 

Information Technology 

• MGMT-626 Consulting Practice and Methodologies (3) 

• ITEC-630 Business Analysis and Data Design (3) 

• ITEC-643 Project Management and Business Process (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 
rrEC-640 Global Connectivity ( 1 .5) 

rrEC-641 Global Collaborative Technology and Virtual 

Teams (1.5) 
ITEC-652 Strategic Management of Global Information 

Systems (1.5) 
ITEC-655 Outsourcing and OfTshoring (1.5) 
ITEC-656 Topics in Management of Global Information 

Technology ( 1 .5-3) 
ITEC-658 International Electronic Commerce (1.5) 
ITEC-666 Information Security Technology and 

Management (1.5) 

International Business 

• MGMT-626 Consulting Practice and Methodologies (3) 

• lBUS-704 Strategic and Organizational Challenges for the 

Multinational Enterprise (3) 

• ITEC-643 Project Management and Business Process (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the follow ing: 

IBUS-685 Topics in Intemational Business (1.5-3) 

IBUS-705 Export-Import Management ( 1 .5) 

IBUS-740 Project Finance in Developing and Transitional 

Economies (1.5) 
IBUS-741 Intemational Technology Transfer (1.5) 
IBUS-744 Intemational Dimensions of Management: Study 

Abroad Project (3) 
IBUS-745 Global Supply Chain Management (3) 
IBUS-746 Global Emerging Market (3) 
IBUS-747 Doing Business in Different National and 

Cultural Environments (1.5) 
IBUS-748 Management in Emerging Markets (1.5) 

Management 

• ITEC-643 Project Management and Business Process (3) 

• MGMT-61 1 Change and Innovation (3) 

• MGMT-626 Consulting Practice and Methodologies (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 
MGMT-665 Negotiations (3) 
MGMT-666 Strategic Alliances, Mergers and 

Acquisitions (3) 
MGMT-685 Topics in Management (1.5-3) 



Corporate Finance: Investment Banking 
(13.5 credit hours) 

In this track students prepare for careers in the financial ser- 
vices industry; specifically within investment banking with 
specializations in either corporate finance and private equity, or 
trading and sales. The broad range of courses allows students to 
acquire the requisite skills, quantitative expertise, and institu- 
tional knowledge to succeed in this competitive work 
environment. 

• FlN-671 Advanced Financial Management (3) 

• FIN-673 Corporate Valuation and Financial Strategy (3) 

• FIN-677 Financial Statement Analysis (3) 

• 4.5 credit hours from one of the following: 
Corporate Finance and Private Equit}' 

FIN-672 Investment Analysis and Portfolio 
Management (3) 

FrN-674 Derivatives and Risk Management (3) 

FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate ( 1 .5-3) 
Trading and Selling 

ACCT-685 Topics in Accounting (1.5) 

ECON-522 Econometrics (3) 

FIN-672 Investment Analysis and Portfolio 
Management (3) 

FIN-674 Derivatives and Risk Management (3) 

FIN-680 Investment Banking (1.5) 

FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate ( 1 .5-3) 

IBUS-700 Intemational Finance (3) 

Corporate Finance: Commercial Banking 

(12 credit hours) 

Prepares students for a career path w hich leads to senior ex- 
ecuti\ e positions m banking and senior executive positions in 
the corporate finance fiinction of companies. 

• FIN-677 Financial Statement Analysis (3) 

• FIN 682-Managing Depository Institutions (1.5) 

• IBUS-701 Intemational Banking (1.5) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ACCT-670 Intemational Accounting (3) 

FIN 673 Corporate Valuation and Financial Strategy (3) 
FIN-674 Derivatives and Risk Management (3) 
IBUS-700 Intemational Finance (3) 
MGMT-665 Negotiations (3) 

Corporate Finance: Corporate Financial Management 

(12 credit hours) 

Prepares students for positions in this field in the finance 
ftinction of entrepreneurial and mid- and large sized companies. 

• ACCT-725 Modem Management Control Systems (3) 

• FfN-671 Advanced Financial Management (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ACCT-670 Intemational Accounting (3) 
FIN-672 Investment Analysis and Portfolio 

Management (3) 
FIN-673 Corporate Valuation and Financial Strategy (3) 



Kogod School of Business 195 



FlN-674 Derivatives and Risk Management (3) 
IBUS- 700 International Finance (3) 
lBUS-701 International Banking (1.5) 
Entreprcneurship (12 credit hours) 

Provides students with the opportunity to behave like an en- 
trepreneur in employee and management roles and the tools for 
starting, managing, and growing a business. Students learn how 
to work with closely-held businesses and how to assess 
start-ups as potential vendors and investments. 

• MGMT-660 Entreprcneurship and Innovation (3) 

• MGIVIT-66 1 Entreprcneurship Practicuni: New Venture 

Business Plan (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

MGMT-663 Managing Private and Family Businesses (1.5) 
MGMT-666 Strategic Alliances, Mergers and 

Acquisitions (3) 
MGMT-667 Corporate Entreprcneurship: Creating High 

Potential Ventures (1.5) 
MGMT-668 Global Entreprcneurship and Micro 

Ventures (1.5) 
MGMT-669 Entreprcneurship Financing, Venture Capital 

and Legal Strategies (3) 
MGMT-670 Nonprofit and Social Entreprcneurship and 

Strategy (3) 
MGMT-685 Topics in Management (1.5-3) 
Global Emerging Markets (12 credit hours) 
This track is designed to give students the skills and tools to 
understand and do business in and with emerging market coun- 
tries and companies. TTiree specializations share a common 
core of required courses and provide students with the opportu- 
nity to pursue specialized functional courses in finance or infor- 
mation technology: Doing Business in Global Emerging 
Markets (for students who wish to develop specialized regional 
and country expertise and foreign language skills). Global 
Emerging Markets and Information Technology (for sUidcnts 
who wish to be involved in outsourcing and electronic com- 
merce), and Global Emerging Markets and Finance. 

Global Emerging Markets: Business 

• lBUS-746 Global Emerging Market (3) 

• lBUS-747 Doing Business in DitTcrent National and 

Cultural Environments (1.5) 

• 7.5 credit hours from the following: 
IBUS-685 Topics in International Business( 1 .5-3) 
lBUS-704 Strategic and Organizational Challenges for the 

Multinational Enterprise (3) 
IBUS-741 International Technology Transfer (1.5) 
lBUS-744 International Dimensions of Management: Study 

Abroad Project (3) 
IBUS-748 Management in Emerging Markets (1.5) 
SIS-539 Comparative Development Strategies (3) 
SlS-579 Selected Regional and Country Studies (3) (topics) 
Approved SIS graduate level course 
Approved graduate foreign language course 



Global Emerging Markets: Finance 

• IBUS-700 International Finance (3) 

• IBUS-746 Global Emerging Market (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ACCT-670 International Accounting (3) 
FIN-680 Investment Banking (1.5) 
FrN-681 Financial Intennediation in Emerging 

Markets (1.5) 
IBUS-685 Topics in International Business (1.5-3) 
IBUS-701 International Banking (1.5) 
IBUS-705 Export-Import Management (1.5) 
IBUS-740 Project Finance in Developing and Transitional 

Economies (1.5) 
IBUS-74 1 Intemational Technology Transfer ( 1 .5) 
lBUS-744 Intemational Dimensions of Management: Study 

Abroad Project (3) 
BUS-747 Doing Business in Different National and 

Cultural Environments ( 1 .5) 
IBUS-748 Management in Emerging Markets ( 1 .5) 
Global Emerging Markets: Information Technology 

• IBUS-746 Global Emerging Market (3) 

• ITEC-643 Project Management and Business Process (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

IBUS-685 Topics in Intemational Business (1.5-3) 
IBUS-741 Intemational Technology Transfer (1.5) 
IBUS-747 Doing Business in Different National and 

Cultural Environments ( 1 .5) 
IBUS-748 Management in Emerging Markets ( 1 .5) 
ITEC-654 Nations, Policy, and Information 

Technology (1.5) 
ITEC-655 Outsourcing and Offshoring ( 1 .5) 
ITEC-656 Topics in Management of Global Information 

Technology (1.5-3) 
ITEC-658 Intemational Electronic Commerce (1.5) 
ITEC-709 Managing the Infonnation Teclinology Vendor 

Relationship ( 1.5) 
International Trade and Global Supply Chain 
Management (9 credit hours) 

Designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills 
required for the effective management of the global trade and 
supply chain operations of the multinational enterprise. Stu- 
dents obtain know ledge of supply chain management, purchas- 
ing and logistics operations, market entry strategies, 
export-import management, technology transfer and other rele- 
vant intemational business areas. 

• rBUS-704 Strategic and Organizational Challenges for the 

Multinational Enterprise (3) 

• IBUS-705 Export-Import Management (1.5) 

• IBUS-745 Global Supply Chain Management (3) 

• 1.5 credit hours from the follow ing or other courses approved 
by advisor: 

IBUS-701 Intemational Banking (1. 5) 



196 Kogod School of Business 



IBUS-740 Project Finance in Developing and Transitional 

Economies ( 1 .5) 
IBUS-741 International Technology Transfer (1.5) 
rBUS-748 Management in Emerging Markets (1.5) 
ITEC-656 Topics in Management of Global Information 

Teclmology (1.5-3) 
Marketing Management (9 credit hours) 
This track offers students the opportunity to apply key mar- 
keting concepts to "real life" situations by case studies and pro- 
jects for profit and non-profit organizations. It prepares students 
for a variety of marketing management fields, including adver- 
tising, sales promotion, media planning, account management, 
intemet marketing, and brand management. Students gain a 
thorough understanding of key marketing concepts such as tar- 
get market selection, positioning, new product'service develop- 
ment, distribution strategies, pricing strategies, and promotional 
strategies. 

• MKTG-765 Brand Strategy (3) 

• MKTG-764 Survey Methods in Marketing Research (1.5) 

or 

MKTG-766 Qualitative Methods in Marketing 
Research (1.5) 

• 4.5 credit hours from the following: 
MKTG-750 Intemet Marketing Management (1.5) 
MKTG-754 Database Marketing (1.5) 
MKTG-755 Applied Market Segmentation (3) 
MKTG-761 Buyer Behavior (1.5) 

MKTG-762 Integrated Marketing Communication (3) 
MKTG-764 Survey Mediods in Marketing Research (1.5) 
or 
MKTG-766 Qualitative Methods in Marketing 

Research (1.5) 
Marketing Research (9 credit hours) 
Designed to prepare smdents for careers in the marketing re- 
search field, either with marketing research suppliers or with 
companies that use research to improve marketing decision 
making. Students leam the psychological foundations of buyer 
behavior, the principles of designing survey questionnaires, the 
fiindamentals of analyzing survey data, and the appropriate use 
of staristical techniques and computer software to analyze re- 
search data. 

• MKTG-761 Buyer Behavior (1.5) 

• MKTG-764 Survey Methods in Marketing Research (1.5) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 
MKTG-754 Database Marketing (1.5) 
MKTG-755 Applied Market Segmentarion (3) 
MKTG-766 Qualitative Methods in Marketing 

Research (1.5) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 

STAT-515 Regression (3) (prerequisite: STAT-514 or 

equivalent) 
STAT-516 Design of Experiments (3) (prerequisite: 

STAT-5 14 or equivalent) 



STAT-520 Applied Multivariate Analysis (3) (prerequisite: 

STAT-5 14 or equivalent) 
STAT-521 Analysis of Categorical Data (3) (prerequisite: 

STAT-5 14 or equivalent) 
Real Estate (9 credit hours) 

This career track offers courses including real estate princi- 
ples, residential and commercial real estate mortgage markets, 
and real estate development. KSB maintains and actively pro- 
motes strong contacts with local professional associations in- 
cluding the Washington, DC. Association of Realtors, the 
Appraisal Institute and the secondary mortgage market. 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 

ACCT-746 Taxation of Real Estate Transactions (3) 
FrN-671 Advanced Financial Management (3) 
FIN-730 Real Estate Principles and Investment (3) 
FIN-732 Residential Real Estate and Mortgage 

Markets (3) 
FIN-733 Commercial Real Estate and Mortgage 

Markets (3) 
FlN-734 Real Estate Development (3) 
Ta.xation (12 credit hours) 

Provides students with the skills required to work in the tax 
departments of public accounting ftrms and large corporations. 

• ACCT 630 Legislative and Judicial Foundarions in 

Taxation (3) 

• ACCT 63 1 Tax Research and Procedure (3) 

• ACCT 740 Corporate Income Taxation (3) 

• ACCT 747 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities (3) 

Career Advancement Track in Leadership (9 credit 
hours) 

Intended for sUidents who are pursuing an MBA for pur- 
poses of career advancement (promotion to leadership positions 
v\'ithin their current functional areas) rather than career change 
(moving into business careers, or switching fijnctional areas). 

• MGMT 6 1 1 Change and Innovation (3) 

• MGMT 664 Leadership: Exploring Styles and 

Developing Competencies (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 
MGMT-634 High-Performing Teams (1.5) 
MGMT-665 Negotiations (3) 
MGMT-685 Topics in Management ( 1 .5-3) 

Master of Business Administration 
and J.D. 

Admission to the Program 

Applicants must sarisfy the admission requirements of both 
the Kogod School of Business and Washington College of Law 
before being admitted to the program. However, students who 
have been admitted to Washington College of Law will not be 
required to take the GMAT. 



Kogod School of Business 197 



M.B.A. Degree Requirements 

• 52 credit hours of approved graduate course work including 
26.5 credit hours of required courses and 1 3.5 credit hours of 
electives. 

A minimum of 30 credits taken in residence from the Kogod 
School of Business is required for the M.B.A. 
Up to 9 credit hours of course work may be waived from 
ACCT-607, FrN-605. and ITEC-610 if sUidents have taken 
equivalent course work at the undergraduate level in the past 
seven years, received grades of B or better, and pass an 
examination during orientation for each course waived. Any 
waived courses are waived with replacement of an equal 
number of credits of other course work. 
Up to 9 credit hours earned at another AACSB-accredited 
M.B.A. program may be transferred and applied to the Kogod 
M.B.A. requirements. 

M.B.A. students may take a maximum of 6 credit hours in 
500-level courses or graduate courses which meet 
concurrently with undergraduate courses. 
M.B.A. students may take a maximum of 6 credits with a 
pass/fail grade. Pass/fail grades are not pennitted for any core 
requirements, for a student's career track courses, or for 
KSB-688 Applied Business Practicum. A pass grade is 
equivalent to B or higher; a fail grade is equivalent to B- or 
lower 

JD/MBA dual degree policy requires students to defer taking 
12-15 credit hours of M.B.A. course work, depending on the 
number of M.B.A. courses waived, until completion of the JD 
degree. 
Course Requirements 
Core (26.5 credit hours) 

• ACCT-607 Accounting Concepts and Applications (3) 

• FrN-605 Managerial Economics (3) 

• FlN-614 Financial Management (3) 

• IBUS-610 International Business Analysis (1.5) 

• ITEC-610 Applied Managerial Statistics (3) 

• ITEC-617 Information and Technology (1.5) 

• lTEC-61 8 Applied Production and Operations 

Management ( 1.5) 

• KSB-071 Career Management 1 (0) 

• KSB-072 Career Management II (0) 

• KSB-602 Strategic Decision-Making in a Global 

Environment (3) 

• KSB-610 Strategic Thinking (1.5) 

• KSB-655 Business Communications ( 1 ) 

• MGMT-613 Managing People in Organizations (1.5) 

• MKTG-612 Marketing Management (3) 



Career Tracks and Electives (25.5 credit hours) 

• 13.5 credit hours in a career track 

• 1 2 credit hours in law concentration from JD course work 
A maximum of 3 credit hours may be taken in an intemship 
for elective credit (see internship for credit program, above) 

J.D. Degree Requirements 

• 86 credit hours 

Tlie Washington College of Law may give up to a maximum 
of 6 credit hours toward the J.D. for courses taken at the 
Kogod School, provided they are approved by the Joint 
Washington College of Law-Kogod School of Business 
Committee. 

Master of Business Administration and 
Master of Laws in International Legal 
Studies (L.L.M.) 

Graduates receive an M.B.A. from the Kogod School of 
Business (KSB) and an L.L.M. from the Washington College of 
Law (WCL). Neither degree will be awarded until all 
requirement.s for both degrees are completed. 
Admission to the Program 

Applicants must satisfy the admission requirements of both 
the Kogod School of Business and Washington College of Law 
before being admitted to the program. Students must have com- 
pleted their law degree at a U.S. law school accredited by the 
American Bar Association or at a foreign law school with 
equivalent standards. Admission to the M.B.A. requires an in- 
terview, a separate personal statement, additional letters of rec- 
ommendation, and a GMAT score. 

Students in the M.B.A./L.L.M. dual degree program pay tu- 
ition and fees according to the WCL schedule. 
Degree Requirements 

• 52 credit hours including 37 credit hours of approved 
graduate course work I'rom KSB and 16 credit hours of 
approved WCL course work 

The first semester in the program must be spent as a full-time 
L.L.M. student. 
M.B.A. Degree Requirements 

• 37 credit hours of approved graduate course work including 
26.5 credit hours of required MBA courses, and 10.5 credit 
hours of business electives. 1. 5 credit hours may be taken in 
an intemship as elective credit. 

Course Requirements 
Core (26.5 credit hours) 

• ACCT-607 Accounting Concepts and Applications (3) 

• FIN-605 Managerial Economics (3) 

• FIN-614 Financial Management (3) 

• IBUS-610 International Business Analysis ( 1 .5) 

• ITEC-610 Applied Managerial Statistics (3) 



198 Kogod School of Business 



• ITEC-6 1 7 Information and Technology (1.5) 

• ITEC-6 18 Applied Production and Operations 

Management (1.5) 

• KSB-071 Career Management 1 (0) 

• KSB-072 Career Management 11(0) 

• KSB-602 Strategic Decision-Making in a Global 

Environment (3) 

• KSB-610 Strategic Thinking (1.5) 

• KSB-655 Business Communications ( 1 ) 

• MGMT-613 Managing People in Organizations (1 .5) 

• MKTG-6 12 Marketing Management (3) 

MBA Career Tracks and Electives (10.5) credit hours) 

• A minimum of 9 credit hours in a career track 

• 1 .5 credit hours in electives 
L.L.M. Degree Requirements 

• 16 credit hours including two research papers; LAW-580 
Introduction to American Legal Institutions (for students with 
civil law backgrounds); English for Lawyers (for students 
who need extra practice with English); no intemship credit 
may be applied toward the L.L.M. 

M. S. in Accounting 

The M.S. in Accounting (M.S. A.) degree provides ad- 
vanced study for students with undergraduate accounting de- 
grees who seek a fifth year of professional education to satisfy 
150-hour CPA licensure requirements. In addition, the program 
is sufficiently flexible to prepare both students with 
non-accounting undergraduate business degrees and those with 
non-business undergraduate degrees for accounting careers in a 
variety of organizational settings. The program may be com- 
pleted on a fiill- or part-time basis. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the university requirements for grad- 
uate study, applicants must have earned a satisfactory score on 
the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and must 
have earned a satisfactory grade point average for the last 60 
hours of academic work from a Council of Postsecondary Ac- 
creditation (COPA) regionally-accredited institution. Appli- 
cants whose first language is not English are also required to 
take the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) and 
demonstrate English language proficiency. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours including a minimum of 15 credit hours in 
graduate accounting course work and 15 credit hours in 
graduate business or accounting elecrives. 

Across bachelor and M.S. in Accounting degrees combined, 
students must complete at least 27 credit hours in accounting, 
in addition to specific business core courses. Students 
entering the M.S.A. program with undergraduate accounting 
degrees can typically satisfy M.S.A. degree requirements by 
completing 15 graduate accounting hours. The remaining 15 
credit hours can be used to develop complementary expertise 



in a related field or specialized expertise in financial reporting 
and assurance or taxation 

Students with non-accountmg undergraduate degrees may be 
required to use the 1 5 credit hour elective component to meet 
overall accounting requirements. 

Students entering the program with non-business 
undergraduate degrees may be required to complete graduate 
course work in managerial economics, financial 
management, managerial statistics, and principles of 
accounting, potentially increasing total M.S.A. course 
requirements to a maximum of 36 graduate credit hours. 
On admission to the program, students will consult with the 
program director to design an approved program of study that 
meets both overall program goals and individual academic 
and professional objectives. 
Course Requirements 

• ACCT-607 Accounting Concepts and Applications (3) 

• FlN-605 Managerial Economics (3) 

• FIN-6 14 Financial Management (3) 

• ITEC-610 Applied Managerial Statistics (3) 

Students with undergraduate degrees from 
AACSB-accredited business programs are presumed to have 
satisfied this requirement. All or part of this requirement may 
be waived for other students who have completed courses in 
principles in accounting, microeconomics, financial 
management, andyor statistics. 

• ACCT-608 Cost Accounting (3) 

or 
6 credit hours of intermediate financial accounting 

• ACCT-64 1 Corporate Financial Reporting (3) 

or 
3 credit hours of intermediate managerial accounting 

• 3 credit hours in each of taxation, auditing, and business law 

M. S. in Finance 

The M.S. in Finance (M.S.F.) program provides students an 
opportunity to obtain focused training in finance that will pre- 
pare them for professionally-oriented careers in finance. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must ha\e earned an un- 
dergraduate bachelor's degree from an accredited institution 
with a satisfactory grade point average and a satisfactory score 
on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) in an appropriate area, 
and must have earned a satisfactory grade point average for the 
last 60 credit hours of academic work from a Council of 
Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA) regionally-accredited in- 
stitution. Applicants whose first language is not English must 
have a satisfactory score on the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL). Applicants must also have earned satisfac- 
tory grades in introductory economics, basic statistics, and ac- 
counting courses before formally entering the program. 



Kogod School of Business 199 



Deficiencies in these prerequisite courses may be completed at 
American University or at other schools. 
Degree Requirements 

• 33 credit hours including 9 credit hours of introductory, 9 
credit hours of core, and 1 5 credit hours of elective course 
work 

Prerequisite Courses 

All prerequisites must be satisfied, either at the undergraduate or 

graduate levels, prior to enrollment in the M.S.F. 

• 6 undergraduate credit hours of micro and macroeconomics 
or 3 graduate credit hours in economics 

• 3 credit hours of statistics 

• 6 undergraduate credit hours of financial accounting or 3 
graduate credit hours in accounting 

Introductory Courses (9 credit hours) 
These courses may be waived if the student has earned a B- or 
better in an equivalent course; 3 credit hours may be waived 
without substitution, the other 3 to 6 credits must be taken in ad- 
ditional advanced courses as approved by the M.S.F. director. 

• FIN-614 Financial Management (3) 

• FrN-555 Financial Modeling (3) 

• STAT-514 Statistical Methods (3) 
Core Courses (9 credit hours) 

• FrN-674 Derivatives & Risk Management (3) 

• FrN-684 Fi.xed Income Analysis (3) 

• FIN-686 Quantitative Methods in Finance (3) 
Elective Courses (15 credit hours) 

• 1 5 credit hours fi'om the following with up to 6 credit hours 
from graduate-level accounting, economics, statistics or 
other courses approved by the M.S.F. director: 

FIN-671 Advanced Financial Management (3) 
FIN-672 Investment Analysis and Portfolio 

Management (3) 
FrN-673 Corporate Valuation and Financial Strategy (3) 
FrN-677 Financial Statement Analysis (3) 
F[N-680 Investment Banking (1.5) 
FIN-681 Financial Intermediation in Emerging 

Markets (1.5) 
FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate { 1 .5-3) 
IBUS-700 International Finance (3) 

M. S. in Finance and Real Estate 

The M.S. in Finance and Real Estate program provides stu- 
dents an opportunity to obtain focused training in real estate that 
will prepare them for professionally-oriented careers in finance 
in areas such as asset management, mortgage markets, property 
management, and corporate finance. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must have earned an un- 
dergraduate bachelor's degree from an accredited institution 
with a satisfactory grade point average and a satisfactory score 



on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), and 
must have earned a satisfactory grade point average for the last 
60 credit hours of academic work from a Council of 
Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA) regionally-accredited in- 
stitution. Applicants whose first language is not English must 
have a satisfactory score on the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL). Applicants must also have earned satisfac- 
tory grades in introductory economics, basic statistics, and ac- 
counting courses before formally entering the program. 
Deficiencies in these prerequisite courses may be completed at 
American University or at other schools. 
Degree Requirements 

• 33 credit hours including 9 credit hours of introductory, 6 
credit hours of core, and 1 8 credit hours of elective course 
work 

Prerequisite Courses 

All prerequisites must be satisfied, eitherat the undergraduate or 

graduate levels, prior to enrollment in the degree program. 

• 6 undergraduate credit hours of micro and macroeconomics 
or 3 graduate credit hours in economics 

• 3 credit hours of statistics 

• 6 undergraduate credit hours of financial accounting or 3 
graduate credit hours in accounting 

Introductory Courses (9 credit hours) 
These courses may be waived if the student has earned a B- or 
better in an equivalent course; 3 credit hours may be waived 
without substitution, the other 3 to 6 credits must be taken in ad- 
ditional advanced courses as approved. 

• FIN-614 Financial Management (3) 

• FIN-555 Financial Modeling (3) 

• STAT-514 Statistical Methods (3) 
Core Courses (6 credit hours) 

• FIN-684 Fixed Income Analysis (3) 

• FIN-686 Quantitative Methods in Finance (3) 
Elective Courses (18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours with at least 12 credit hours from the 
following and up to 6 credit hours from other graduate-level 
courses accounting, economics, statistics, or other courses 
approved by the program director: 

FrN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate ( 1 .5-3) 
FIN-730 Real Estate Principles and ln\estments (3) 
FIN-731 Real Estate: Managing Properties (1.5) 
FIN-732 Residential Real Estate and Mortgage Markets (3) 
FIN-733 Commercial Real Estate and Mortgage 

Markets (3) 
FIN-734 Real Estate Development (3) 

M.S. in Taxation 

The M.S. in Taxation provides a professionally-onented 
specialty master's degree focusing on federal income taxation. 
It is designed to advance students' careers and broaden their op- 
tions with skills in specialized areas and comprehensive exper- 



200 Kogod School of Business 



tise in the field of taxation. This convenient yet demanding 
program facilitates opportunities with the largest professional 
service organizations in the world, enhances flexible career 
paths, and creates opportunities for starting businesses. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants must have earned an un- 
dergraduate bachelor's degree in business administration from 
a Council on Post Secondary Accreditation (COPA) region- 
ally-accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point aver- 
age for the last 60 credit hours and a satisfactory score on the 
Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Students who 
have successfully completed the CPA examination may substi- 
tute it for the GMAT. 

Applicants must demonstrate satisfactory completion of 
course work equivalent to the Common Body of Knowledge for 
undergraduate business education as currently defined by 
AACSB International, the Association to Advance Collegiate 
Schools of Business. In addition, applicants must have completed 
two semesters of intemiediate accounting, and one semester of 
business law, federal income taxation, and macroeconomics. Any 
deficiencies in these prerequisite courses must be completed at the 
graduate level at American University after adinission to the pro- 
gram, in addition to other program requirements. M.S. in Taxation 
students are subject to the same mathematics competency require- 
ments as M.B.A. students. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours with a minimum of 21 hours in taxation 
including two required core courses (6 credit hours), a 
research component (6 credit hours) and three elective 
courses (9 credit hours). The remaining 9 credit hours must 
consist of additional tax courses or, with the permission of the 
program director, non-tax courses necessary to meet state 
CPA licensure requirements. 

Course Requirements 

Core Tax Courses (6 credit hours) 

• ACCT-630 Legislative and Judicial Foundations of 

Income Tax (3) 

• ACCT-631 Tax Research and Procedure (3) 

Research Component (6 credit hours) 

• 6 credit hours with grades of B or better from the following: 
ACCT-740 Taxation of Corporations (3) 

ACCT-743 International Taxation (3) 
ACCT-746 Taxation of Real Estate Transactions (3) 
ACCT-747 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities (3) 
ACCT-750 Tax Policy (3) 
ACCT-75 1 Seminar in Business Tax Planning (3) 
Elective Courses (18 credit hours) 

• A total of 1 8 additional credit hours (courses may not be used 
to fulfill the research requirement above and as an elective) 
with at least 9 credit hours from the following courses. The 
remaining 9 credit hours must consist of additional tax 
courses or, with the permission of the program director. 



non-tax courses necessary to meet state CPA licensure 

requirements. 

ACCT-740 Taxation of Corporations (3) 

ACCT-741 State and Local Taxation (3) 

ACCT-742 Special Tax Topics (1-3) 

ACCT-743 International Taxation (3) 

ACCT-745 Employee Benefit Tax Planning (3) 

ACCT-746 Taxation of Real Estate Transactions (3) 

ACCT-747 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities (3) 

ACCT-750 Tax Policy (3) 

ACCT-75 1 Seminar in Business Tax Planning (3) 

ACCT-752 Seminar in Family Financial Planning (3) 

Graduate Business Certificates 

Graduate Certificate in Real Estate 
Finance 

This certificate is designed for current managers seeking ad- 
vancement in the field, or professionals seeking entry into real 
estate management. 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and eam minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 

Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better 

Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fiilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must be 
enrolled in at least 6 credit hours during each 12 month 
period. Students must complete the certificate within four 
years. 
Prerequisites 

Passing grades in introduction to economics and introduc- 
tion to accounting courses, and passing grade in undergraduate 
statistics course or passing score on mathematics equivalency 
examination. 

Course Requirements 

• FrN-614 Financial Management (3) 

• FIN-730 Real Estate Principles and Invesmients (3) 

• FIN-732 Residential Real Estate and Mortgage Markets (3) 

• FIN-733 Commercial Real Estate and Mortgage 

Markets (3) 

• FIN-734 Real Estate Development (3) 



Kogod School of Business 201 



Graduate Certificate in Financial 
Planning and Wealth Management 

This certificate is designed for individuals wishing to be- 
come certified financial planners. 
Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited instiuition with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and earn minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better 

Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Smdents must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must be 
enrolled in at least 6 credit hours during each 12 month 
period. Students must complete the certificate within four 
years. 
Prerequisites 

Passing grades in introduction to economics and introduc- 
tion to accounting courses, and passing grade in undergraduate 
statistics course or passing score on mathematics equivalency 
examination. 
Course Requirements 

• ACCT-752 Seminar in Family Financial Planning (3) 

• FrN-614 Financial Management (3) 

• FrN-672 Investment Analysis and Portfolio 

Management (3) 

• FIN-674 Derivatives and Risk Management (3) 

• FlN-677 Financial Statement Analysis (3) 

Graduate Certificate in Tax 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English arc 
required to take and earn minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better. 

Cirades of C or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 



courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must 
have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate courses in order to be 
awarded a certificate. SUidents must be enrolled in at least 6 
credit hours during each 12 month period. Students must 
complete the certificate within four years. 
Prerequisites 

Passing grades in introduction to economics and introduc- 
tion to accounting courses, and passing grade in undergraduate 
statistics course or passing score on mathematics equivalency 
examination. 
Course Requirements 

• ACCT-630 Legislative and Judicial Foundations of 

Income Tax (3) 

• ACCT-63 1 Tax Research and Procedure (3) 

• ACCT-740 Taxation of Corporations (3) 

• ACCT-747 Taxation of Pass-Through Entifies (3) 

• additional approved tax course (3) 

Graduate Certificate in Advanced 

Tax Concepts 

Admission to the Program 

Open to sUidents with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
fi-om an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and earn minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better. 

Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fijlfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must 
have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate courses in order to be 
awarded a certificate. Students must be enrolled in at least 6 
credit hours during each 12 month period. Students must 
complete the certificate within four years. 
Prerequisites 

Passing grades in introduction to economics and introduc- 
tion to accounting courses, and passing grade in undergraduate 
statistics course or passing score on mathematics equivalency 
examination. 
Course Requirements 

• ACCT-743 Intemational Taxation (3) 

• ACCT-745 Employee Benefit Tax Planning (3) 

• ACCT-75 1 Seminar in Business Tax Planning (3) 

• ACCT-752 Seminar in Family Financial Planning (3) 

• additional approved tax course (.3) 



202 Kogod School of Business 



Graduate Certificate in Marketing 
Management 

This certificate is designed for current advertising or public 
relations manger seeking advancement in the field, or individ- 
ual seeking to enter the field. 
Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and earn minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better 

Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must 
have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate courses in order to be 
awarded a certificate. Students must be enrolled in at least 6 
credit hours during each 12 month period. Students must 
complete the certificate within four years. 

Prerequisites 

Passing grade in introduction to economics course. 

Course Requirements 

• MKTG-612 Marketing Management (3) 

or 
MKTG-632 Fundamentals of Marketing (3) 

• MKTG-764 Survey Methods in Marketing Research ( 1 .5) 

or 

MKTG-766 Qualitative Methods in Marketing 
Research (1.5) 

• MKTG-765 Brand Strategy (3) 

• MKTG-761 Buyer Behavior (1.5) 

• MKTG-762 Integrated Marketing Communication (3) 

• additional approved marketing course (3) 

Graduate Certificate in Business 
Essentials for Managers 

Designed for professionals seeking advancement in organi- 
zation, change of career into business management, or knowl- 
edge to train entry-level employees. 
Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and eani minimum acceptable scores on the 



Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better. 

Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not ac- 
cepted toward the fijlfillment of certificate requirements, al- 
though these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must be 
enrolled in at least 6 credit hours during each 12 month period. 
Students must complete the certificate within four years. 
Prerequisites 

Passing grade in introduction to economics course. 
Course Requirements 

• ACCT-600 Ethics in Business and Accounting (3) 

or 
ACCT-623 Business Law (3) 

• FIN-630 Financial Analysis: Concepts and Applications (3) 

• ITEC-601 IT Tools for Managers ( 1 .5) 

• ITEC-6 1 7 Information and Technology (1.5) 

• MGMT-609 Organizational Behavior and Human Resource 

Management (3) 
or 
MGMT-633 Leading People and Organizations (3) 

• MKTG-612 Marketing Management (3) 

or 
MKTG-632 Fundamentals of Marketing (3) 

Graduate Certificate in Leadership 
Essentials for Professionals 

Designed for mangers seeking to develop/improve advance- 
ment leadership skills in public or private-sector organizations. 
Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and earn minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better. 

Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not ac- 
cepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, al- 
though these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must be 
enrolled in at least 6 credit hours during each 12 month period. 
Students must complete the certificate within four years. 
Prerequisites 

Passing grade in introduction to economics course. 



Kogod School of Business 203 



Course Requirements 

• MGMT-61 1 Change and Innovation (3) 

• MGMT-61 3 Managing People in Organizations ( 1 .5) 

• MGMT-634 High-Performing Teams (1.5) 

• MGMT-664 Leadership: Exploring Styles and Developing 

Competencies (3) 

• MGMT-665 Negotiations (3) 

• MGMT-666 Strategic Alliances, Mergers and Acquisitions (3) 

Graduate Certificate in Entrepreneurship 

Designed for individuals seeking to start his or her own 
business, take over a family business, or grow a small business 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and eam minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 

Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better. 

Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Smdents must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must be 
enrolled in at least 6 credit hours during each 12 month 
period. Students must complete the certificate within four 
years. 

Prerequisites 

Passing grade in introduction to economics course. 

Course Requirements 

• MGMT-660 Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3) 

• MGMT-66 1 Entrepreneurship Praclicum; New Venture 

Business Plan (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 

MGMT-663 Managing Private and Family Businesses (1.5) 
MGMT-666 Strategic Alliances, Mergers and 

Acquisitions (3) 
MGMT-667 Coiporalc Entrepreneurship: Creating High 

Potential Ventures ( 1 .5) 
MGMT-668 Global Entrepreneurship and Micro 

Ventures (1.5) 
MGMT-669 Entrepreneurship Financing, Venture Capital 

and Legal Strategies (3) 
MGMT-670 Nonprofit and Social Entrepreneurship and 

Strategy (3) 
MGMT-685 Topics in Management ( 1 .5-3) 



Graduate Certificate in Business for 
Professional Health Management 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and eam minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better 

Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the ftilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. SUidents must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must be 
enrolled in at least 6 credit hours during each 12 month 
period. Students must complete the certificate within four 
years. 

Prerequisites 

Passing grade in introduction to economics course. 

Course Requirements 

• lTEC-601 IT Tools for Managers (1.5) 

• ITEC-617 Infonnation and Technology (1.5) 

• MGMT-61 1 Change and Innovation (3) 

• MGMT-633 Leading People and Organizations (3) 

• MGMT-66 1 Entrepreneurship Practicum: New Venture 

Business Plan (3) 

• MKTG-612 Marketing Management (3) 

or 
MKTG-632 Fundainentals of Marketing (3) 

Graduate Certificate in 

International Business 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and eam minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
sfrate English language proficiency. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better 

• Grades of C or D in certificate program courses arc not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must be 



204 Kogod School of Business 



enrolled in at least 6 credit hours during each 1 2 month period. 

Students must complete the certificate within four years. 
Prerequisites 

Passing grade in introduction to economics course. 
Course Requirements 

• FIN-630 Financial Analysis: Concepts and Applications (3) 

• IBUS-618 Manager in the International Econoiny (3) 

• IBUS-745 Global Supply Chain Management (3) 

• ITEC-61 8 Applied Production and Operations 

Management (1.5) 

• 4.5 credit hours trom the following: 
IBUS-701 International Banking ( 1 .5) 
IBUS-705 Export-Import Management (1.5) 
IBUS-740 Project Finance in Developing and Transitional 

Economies ( 1 .5) 
IBUS-741 Intemational Technology Transfer ( 1 .5) 
IBUS-747 Doing Business in Different National and 

Cultural Environments (1.5) 

• IBUS-748 Management in Emerging Markets (1.5) 

Graduate Certificate in IT Team 
Management in Global-time 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and eam minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better 

• Grades of C or D in ccrti ficate program courses are not accepted 
toward the flilfillment of certificate requirements, although 
these grades will be included in the calculation of the GPA. 
Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate courses in 
order to be awarded a certificate. Students must be enrolled in at 
least 6 credit hours during each 1 2 month period. Students must 
complete the certificate within four years. 

Course Requirements 

• ITEC-641 Global Collaborative Technology and 

Virtual Teams (1.5) 

• lTEC-655 Outsourcing and Offshoring (1.5) 

• ITEC-656 Topics in Management of Global Information 

Technology (1.5-3): 
Social Networking and Business 

• ITEC-5xx, 6xx, or 7xx course (3) 

• MGMT-633 Leading People and Organizations (3) 

• MGMT-634 High-Performance Teams (1.5) 

• MGMT-665 Negotiations (3) 



Graduate Certificate in Business Analysis 
for IT Consulting 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution with a satisfactory grade point av- 
erage. Applicants must have at least one year of work experi- 
ence. Applicants whose first language is not English are 
required to take and eam minimum acceptable scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and demon- 
strate English language proficiency. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 15 credit hours of approved course work with grades of B or 
better 

• Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students must be 
enrolled in at least 6 credit hours during each 12 month 
period. Students must complete the certificate within four 
years. 

Course Requirements 

• ITEC-630 Business Analysis and Data Design (3) 

• ITEC-643 Project Management and Business Process (3) 

• ITEC-655 Outsourcing and Offshoring ( 1 .5) 

• MGMT-626 Consulting Practice and Methodologies (3) 

• 4.5 credit hours from the following: 

FIN-630 Financial Analysis: Concepts and Applications (3) 
ITEC-5.XX, 6xx, or 7xx course (3) 
MGMT-633 Leading People and Organizations (3) 
MGMT-634 High-Performance Teams (1.5) 

Graduate Certificate in Global 
Information Technology 

This interdisciplinary certificate, offered by the Kogod 
School of Business (KSB) and the School of Intemational Ser- 
vice (SIS), gives students the skills and knowledge to work in 
organizations that support information technology globally. It is 
designed for business professionals who work across many lo- 
cations, and professionals in intemational organizations, gov- 
ernments, and nongovernmental organizations with 
responsibility for strategy, policy, and implementation of infor- 
mation technology in developing and emerging economies. 
Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution and preferably at least one year of 
work experience. Applicants must submit their official tran- 
scripts along with a one page statement of purpose to either 
Kogod or SIS. Both schools will review applications. For inter- 
national students whose first language is not English, a score of 
at least 550 (2 1 3 on the computer version) on the Test of Eng- 
lish as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required. 



Kogod School of Business 205 



Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5.5 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 
credit hours at the 600-level or above and grades of B or 
above 

Grades of C or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfihment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-inonth period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International sUidents must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A ma.ximum of 3 credit 
hours eamed at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 



Course Requirements 

• lTEC-630 Business Analysis and Data Design (3) 

or 
ITEC-643 Project Management and Business Process (3) 

• 4.5 credit hours from approved ITEC-5xx, 6xx, or 7xx 
courses 

• SlS-628 Advanced Topics in International 

Communication (3): 
Global Knowledge Economy 
or 

SIS-644 Communication and Social and Economic 
Development (3) 

• SIS-633 Selected Topics in International Communication 
(1) (taken twice for a total of 2 credit hours) 

• SIS-642 Cross-Cultural Communication (3) 



School of Communication 

• Administration and Faculty 

• Undergraduate Programs 

• Graduate Programs 



Dean Larry Kirkman 

Associate Dean Rose Ann Robertson 

Assistant Dean for Budget and Technology Laura Murray 

Full Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a L.B. Anderson, GP. Hamden, 

J.A. Hendrix, J.E. Orwant. RE. Sutton, L.W. Wolfson, 

J.S. Yamauchi 

Professor R Aufderheide, L. Kirkman, K. Montgomery, 

C. Simpson, L. Steinhom, R.A. Streitmatter 

Associate Professor Emeritus/a B.J. Diggs Brown, 

L.M. Furber, J.C. Seigle, W. Swallow, A. Zelle 

Associate Professor R. Blair, W. J. Campbell, W. Cochran, 

J.C. Doolittle, J.S. Douglass, L. Engel, J. Hall, J.A. Olmsted, 

R. Rockwell, R.A. Stack, J. Watson, R.S. Zahama 

Assistant Professor C. Brown, A. Chuang, , L. Feldman, 

J. Graf, D.C. Hayes, M. Ivancin, L. Jayaswal, 

LB. Krasnow, B. Maher, W. Melillo. S. Menke-Fish, 

M. Nisbet, G Puglisi , M. Stogner 

Distinguished Journalist-in-Residence C. Lewis, 

N. Clooney 

Distinguished Producer-in-Residence C. Palmer 

Distinguished Filmmaker-in-Resldence R. Williams 

Executive-in-Residence D. Lynch 

Artist-in-Residence W. Gentile, G Griffm 

Journalist-in-Residence L. Perri, M. MacDonald 

Director of Writing Programs A. Eisman 

The School of Communication (SOC) educates students to 
master a rapidly changing media and communication environ- 
ment; one that reflects an increasingly complex global, interac- 
tive and diverse society. Through teaching, writing, 
scholarship, and partnerships. SOC and its faculty empower 
graduates with the knowledge, skills, and insights to become re- 
sponsible, ethical professionals in all areas of the communica- 
tion field and to make a difference in the economy, politics, 
culture, and society. With a strategic blend of professional ex- 
pertise and intellectual exploration, and a deep connection with 
the world's communication center of Washington, D.C, the 
school creates a community of knowledge, practice, and impact 
that keeps students, alumni, and faculty at the leading edge of a 
society increasingly defined by media and commumcation. The 



school's hands on, practical programs tap the experts at work in 
Washington, .D.C. including TV, radio, print, and online jour- 
nalists; media strategists in the nonprofit, government, and po- 
litical arenas; and documentary, education, and social advocacy 
media producers. Internships, work opportunities, and class as- 
signments all contribute to experience-based learning. The 
school's state-of-the-art technology supports student research, 
writing, photography, video and film production, digital video 
editing, motion graphics production, Web authoring, and 
graphic design. The school's three divisions each offer under- 
graduate and graduate programs. Journalism and public com- 
munication have been accredited since 1 976 by the Accrediting 
Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication 
(ACEJMC). The film and media arts program is one of only 13 
U.S. schools given membership in CILECT. the International 
Association of Film and Television Schools. 

Film and Media Arts includes the undergraduate program 
and graduate film and electronic media programs. Students may 
study documentary or narrative filmmaking, digital media, or 
photography. A weekend graduate program offers an M.A. in 
Producing for Film and Video. 

Journalism offers undergraduate and graduate degree pro- 
grams in print and broadcast journalism. The master's degree in 
journalism and public affairs includes specializations in public 
policy, economic, and international journalism. Weekend mas- 
ter's programs are offered in interactive journalism and news 
media studies. 

Public Communication has undergraduate and graduate 
programs that focus on the development of media messages and 
strategies for social advocacy, political communication, enter- 
tainment communication, and international communication. 

Communication Studies is an interdisciplinary undergrad- 
uate major that provides students with a foundation in the 
school's three divisions leading to a concentration in a special- 
ized area of study such as media and the government, media 
and society, history of the media, or international media. 

The school also offers an undergraduate interdisciplinary 
program jointly with the College of Arts and Sciences, the B.A. 
in Foreign Language and Communication Media. 

An undergraduate minor in communication, designed for 
users and consumers of mass media rather than practitioners, 
also is available. 



206 



School of Communication 207 



An interdisciplinary graduate degree program, the M.A. in 
International Media, is oflFered in collaboration with the School 
of Intemational Service. 

For more information go to: http://ww\v.american.edu/soc/ 
Faculty 

The SOC full-time faculty blends traditional academic 
scholarship with hands-on professional experience. Faculty 
regularly develop ground-breaking courses, publish books and 
articles, speak at national and intemational conferences and fo- 
mms, produce award-winning films, work for social justice, 
and help shape ethical practices in their individual fields. 
Full-time faculty have won Emmys and Academy Awards, 
been nominated for Pulitzer Prizes, and worked on presidential 
campaigns. SOC also appoints outstanding adjunct faculty, who 
bring depth and insight into the classroom. The adjunct faculty 
are working professionals in all three fields of study, including 
reporters who cover the White House, documentary 
filmmakers, and political strategists. 
Centers and Institutes 

The Center for Social Media (CSM) analyzes and pro- 
motes cutting-edge strategies for media that matters, and gener- 
ates codes of best practice that facilitate participatory public 
media. In addition to film series, workshops, and research, the 
center has resources on social documentaries and public media 
practices. Reports, studies, white papers, film profiles, film- 
maker interviews, and case studies of successflil outreach and 
audience engagement strategies and new media practices are 
available at www.centerforsocialmedia.org' 

The Center for Environmental Filmmaking (CEF) nur- 
tures a new generation of natural history, wildlife, and environ- 
mental filmmakers, and produces films that are entertaining, 
ethically sound, and educationally powertlil. For more informa- 
tion, go to http: //'environmcntalfilm.org/ 

The In\estigati>e Reporting Workshop is the only uni- 
versity research center in the world that specifically examines 
new models for enabling and disseminating investigative re- 
porting. It undertakes significant, original, national and intema- 
tional investigative reporting projects for multimedia 
publication or broadcast in collaboration with others, and serves 
as a laboratory "incubator" to develop new economic models 
and techniques for conducting and delivering investigative 
journalism. For more information, go to 
http://investigativereporting\vorkshop.org/ 

J-Lab: The Institute for Interactive Journalism spon- 
sors, rewards and trains traditional and emerging journalists to 
use digital technologies to reinvent journalism and develop new 
ways for people to participate in public life \\ith projects on 
journalism innovations, entrepreneurship, citizen media, inter- 
active storytelling, research, publications and e-leaming web 
sites. J-Lab's programs, funded with a grant from the Knight 
Foundation, include J-Leaming and the Knight Citizen News 
Network, Web-based, comprehensive community journalism 
instruction programs: the McCormick New Media Women En- 
trepreneurs Project, which provides seed funding and support 
for original news ideas proposed by women; and New Voices, 



which provides start-up fimding and instruction for pioneering 
community news ventures in the United States. J-Lab, 
http://www,j-lab.org/ , also administers the Knight-Batten 
Awards for Innovations in Journalism, one of the profession's 
most prestigious honors. 

The AU Foreign Correspondence Network (FCN) pro- 
vides students tools and guidance needed to work overseas, 
through coursework and AU alumni living abroad. The FCN is 
a platform for discussion about the co\ erage of intemational is- 
sues affecting the United States, and is maintained under the 
guidance of a former foreign correspondent for UPl and 
Newsweek. For more information, go to 
www.american.edu/soc/partnerships/ 
foreign -correspondence-network.cfrn . 

The Summer Film and Video Institute provides hands-on 
experience for expenenced film and digital media professionals 
as well as beginners through both credit and non-credit courses. 
The courses, taught by AU faculty and area professionals, and 
are offered in the evenings and on weekends, beginning in 
mid-May. The Summer in LA Program includes classes with 
entertainment industry professionals as well as internships at 
Hollywood studios and production houses. For more informa- 
tion, go to 
www.american.edu/soc/film/film-digital-media-institute.cfm. 

Student Opportunities 

Study Abroad AU Abroad offers the opportunity for stu- 
dents to study abroad and gain flill American University course 
credit. All students are encouraged to learn and work in another 
culture. AU Abroad enclave programs, many of which include 
internship opportunities, are offered in Beijing, Berlin, 
Brussels, Havana, London, Madrid, Nairobi, Paris, Prague. Ra- 
bat, and Santiago. In addition, through the AU Abroad Partner 
program students may spend a semester or year at prestigious 
universities across the globe, including Argentina, Australia, 
Brazil, Canada, Egypt, Japan, Italy, Korea, Mexico, Nether- 
lands, New Zealand, Nigeria, Shaijah, U.A.E., South Africa, 
Turkey, and the United Kingdom. Intemational study tours led 
by faculty members are offered during semester breaks and 
summer sessions. For more information on AU Abroad pro- 
grams, call 202-885-1320 or 866-313-0757, 
e-mail auabroad(ajamerican.edu or go to: 
www.auabroad.american.edu . 

Internships Students are offered myriad opportunities for 
internships that offer students professional, real-world experi- 
ence to enhance their resumes and help prepare them for 
post-graduation careers. 

Mentoring Program The Alumni-Student Mentoring pro- 
gram strategically matches prominent alumni with top SOC ju- 
niors, seniors, and graduate students through a competitive 
application process. Alumni mentors have included prominent 
filmmakers, journalists, and public communication specialists. 

Msions Festival Tfiis annual awards event features the best 
student work both at the undergraduate and graduate level. 



208 School of Communication 



American Observer is an online magazine produced by 

graduate journalism students that publishes graduate and under- 
graduate student news stories, photography, columns, and audio 
and video. Read American Ohsener at 
w-vy-w.americanobservernet' 
Professional Partnerships 

American Forum The School of Communication collabo- 
rates with WAMU, American University's public radio station, 
to produce The American Forum, a series of one-hour panels 
that bring together AU students with politicians, lobbyists, jour- 
nalists and communication strategists to talk about media and 
public affairs. 

Washington Post Semester Consortium Eight AU jour- 
nalism sUidents-four upper-level undergraduate and four grad- 

Undergraduate Programs 



uate—are chosen in a competitive process each spring to spend a 
semester learning about the newspaper industry from the inside 
out as part of the Washington Post Semester Consortium, a 
weekly one-credit hour class at the paper's downtown office. 
SOC also works closely with The Washington Post to bring edi- 
tors and reporters to campus as part of a regular speakers' series. 

Reel Journalism SOC produces this event with its media 
partner the Newseiun and feaUires films that explore the field of 
journalism and the media, demystify the news business, and 
provide a platfomi to discuss the important role of journalism in 
a democratic society. 

Named Fellowships SOC graduate students may apply for 
a number of named fellowships sponsored by The Center for 
Public Integrity, USAToday, and the Bureau of National Affairs. 



Note: Any student who has earned 60 credit hours and has not 
achieved a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 will not be al- 
lowed to take courses in the school. 

A strong liberal arts background is emphasized by the 
school. To ensure that communication majors attain this back- 
ground, a significant portion of undergraduate course work is 
taken outside the field of communication. 

All students intending to major in communicarion begin to 
take core courses during their freshman and sophomore years. 
During the freshman year COMM- 1 00 Understanding Media is 
required for all students and COMM-200 Writing for Mass 
Communication is usually required during the sophomore year 
Film and media arts majors also take COMM- 1 05 during the 
freshman year, public communication majors take COMM-209 
Cominunication and Society during the sophomore year, and 
journalism majors take COMM-320 Reporting following Writ- 
ing for Mass Communication. 

Students continue with one of the programs (print or broad- 
cast journalism, public communication, film and media arts, or 
communication studies) and take a series of careflilly chosen 
skills courses, and communication media studies courses which 
examine the history, current issues, and ftiture of communica- 
tion and the media. The ability to write correctly and clearly is 
stressed in all programs. 

B.A. in Communication: 
Communication Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale). Snidents should declare 
their major by the end of the sophomore year and no earlier than 
the end of the freshman year 

Students who are unable to achieve a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.50 and declare a major in communication are 
not allowed to take courses in the school after they have com- 
pleted 60 hours of undergraduate credit. 



University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Concentrations 

History of the Media, International Media, Media and Govem- 
ment, or Media and Society 

Major Requirements 

• A minimum of 36 and a maximum of 40 credit hours with 
grades of C or better within the School of Communication 
including core, media ethics and legal aspects, concentration, 
and media studies courses. 

• Related course requirements taken outside the School of 
Communication with grades of C or better 

• A minimum of 80 credit hours outside the field of 
communication, including 65 credit hours in the liberal arts 
and sciences, are required for the major 

Subject to the approval of an advisor, a maximum of 12 credit 
hours in communication transferred from another university 
may be substituted for required communication courses. Trans- 
fer students majoring in communication smdies are required to 
graduate with a total of 80 credit hours outside the field of com- 
munication. 

Related Course Requirements 
Students must complete the following with grades of C or better: 

• 3 credit hours in American history (HlST-.xxx) 

• 3 credit hours in economics (ECON-xxx) 



School of Communication 209 



• A minor or second major outside the School of 
Communication 

Communication Course Requirements 
(36 credit hours) 

Core Courses (15 credit hours) 

• COMM-100 Understanding Media 4:1 (3) 

• COMM-IOS Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 

• COMM-200 Writing for Mass Communication (3) 

• COMM-301 Public Relations (3) 

• COMM-320 Reporting (3) 

Media and Legal Ethics Courses (3 credit hours) 

• One of the following: 

COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 
COMM-504 Journalism Ethics (3) 
COMM-533 Ethical Persuasion (3) 
History of the Media Concentration (18 credit hours) 

• 1 8 credit hours from the following: 
COMM-209 Communication and Society (3) 
COMM-270 How the News Media Shaped History 2:2 (3) 
COMM-275 Dissident Media: Voices from the 

Underground 4:2 (3) 
COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) if not 

used to fiilfill media and ethics requirement above 
COMM-504 Journalism Ethics (3) if not used to fulfill 

media and ethics requirement above 
COMM-505 History of Broadcast Journalism (3) 
COMM-51 1 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-5 14 Censorship and the Media (3) 
COMM-5 16 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) with 

pemiission of the student's advisor 
COMM-5 17 History of Cross-Culmral Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 History of Photography (3) 
COMM-533 Ethical Persuasion (3) if not used to fulfill 

media and ethics requirement above 
COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media (3) with 

permission of the student's advisor 
COMM-547 Great Books in U.S. Journalism (3) 
COMM-586 History of Czech Cinema (3) (Prague) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
COMM-599 Media, Technology and Society (3) 
COMM-391 Internship (3) 
or 

COMM-491 Senior Professional lntemship(3) 
an approved elective outside of SOC 
International Media Concentration (18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours from the following: 
COMM-280 Contemporary Media in a Global 

Society 3:2 (3) 
COMM-507 News Media in Britain (3) (London) 
COMM-516 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) with 

permission of the student's advisor 



COMM-5 17 History of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media (3) with 

permission of the student's advisor 
COMM-539 International Public Relations (3) 
COMM-546 Foreign Policy and the Press (3) 
COMM-548 Global Journalism: Issues and Trends in the 

Twenty-First Century (3) 
COMM-549 Topics in International Media (3) 
COMM-585 Directing (3) (Prague) 
COMM-391 internship (3) 
or 

COMM-491 Senior Professional Intemship (3) 
an approved elective outside of SOC 

Media and Government Concentration 
(18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours from the following: 

COMM-270 How the News Media Shaped History 2:2 (3) 
COMM-275 Dissident Media: Voices from the 

Underground 4:2 (3) 
COMM-327 Tlie PR Presidency (3) 
COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) if not 

used to fiilfill media and ethics requirement above 
COMM-504 Journalism Ethics (3) if not used to fulfill 

media and ethics requirement above 
COMM-508 The Media and Government (3) 
COMM-509 Politics and the Media (3) 
COMM-5 14 Censorship and the Media (3) 
COMM-5 15 Media, Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-516 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) with 

permission of the student's advisor 
COMM-531 Political Communication (3) 
COMM-533 Ethical Persuasion (3) if not used to fulfill 

media and ethics requirement above 
COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media (3) with 

permission of the student's advisor 
COMM-391Intemship (3) 
or 

COMM-491 Senior F^ofessional Intemship (3) 
an approved elective outside of SOC 

Media and Society Concentration (18 credit hours) 

• 1 8 credit hours from the following: 
COMM-209 Communication and Society (3) 
COMM-270 How the News Media Shaped History 2:2 (3) 
COMM-275 Dissident Media: Voices from the 

Underground 4:2 (3) 
COMM-401 Legal Aspectsof Communication (3) if not 

used to fiilfill media and ethics requirement above 
COMM-504 Journalism Ethics (3) if not used to fiilfill 

media and ethics requirement above 
COMM-510 Women in Journalism (3) 
COMM-5 11 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-5 14 Censorship and Ihe Media (3) 
COMM-5 15 Media, Children, and Society (3) 



210 School of Communication 



COMM-5 16 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) with 
pemiission of the student's advisor 

COMM-517 History of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 

COlVlM-533 Ethical Persuasion (3) if not used to fulfill 
media and ethics requirement above 

COMM-534 Race, Gender, and the Media (3) 

COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 

COMM-599 Media. Technology and Society (3) 

COMM-391 Internship (3) 
or 

COMM-491 Senior Professional Internship (3) 

an approved elective outside of SOC 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 1 2 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options (100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years fi-om the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

B.A. in Communication: Journalism 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale). Students should declare 
their major by the end of the sophomore year and no earlier than 
the end of the freshman year. 

Students who are unable to achieve a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.50 and declare a major in communication are 
not allowed to take courses in the school after they have com- 
pleted 60 hours of undergraduate credit. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 



• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examinafion 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

TVacks 

Broadcast Journalism or Print Journalism 

Major Requirements 

• A minimum of 36 and a maximum of 40 credit hours witli 
grades of C or better within the School of Communication 
including core, professional, media studies, internship, 
independent study, and independent reading courses. 

• Related course requirements taken outside the School of 
Communication with grades of C or better 

• A minimum of 80 credit hours outside the field of 
communication, including 65 credit hours in the liberal arts 
and sciences, are required for the major. 

Subject to the approval of an advisor, a maximum of 12 credit 
hours in communication transferred from another university 
may be substituted for required communication courses. Trans- 
fer students majoring in joumalism are required to graduate with 
a total of 80 credit hours outside the field of communication. 
Related Course Requirements 
Students must complete the following with grades of C or better: 

• 3 credit hours in American history (HIST-xxx) 

• 3 credit hours in economics (ECON-xxx) 

• A minor or second major outside the School of 
Communication 

Communication Course Requirements 
(36 credit hours) 

Core Courses (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-IOO Understanding Media 4:1 (3) 

• COMM-200 Writing for Mass Communication (3) 

• COMM-320 Reporting (3) 

Broadcast Journalism Track (27 credit hours) 

• COMM-333 Fundamentals of TV and 'VTR (3) 

• COMM-385 Broadcast Joumalism I (3) 

• COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

• COMM-428 Broadcast Joumalism II (3) 

• COMM-432 Television Field Reporting (3) 

• Four courses from the following: 

COMM-270 How the News Media Shaped History 2:2 (3) 

or 
COMM-275 Dissident Media: Voices fi^om the 
Underground 4:2 (3) 



School of Communication 21 1 



COMM-280 Contemporary Media in a Global Society 3:2 

(3) 
COMM-391 Internship (3) 

or 
COMM-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) 

or 

COMM-491 Senior Professional Internship (3) 
COMM-396 Selected Topics (3 ) with permission of the 

student's advisor 
COMM-433 Broadcast Delivery (3) 
COMM-490 Independent Study Project (3) 
COMM-503 Broadcast Operations and Management (3) 
COMM-504 Journalism Ethics (3) 
COMM-505 History of Broadcast Journalism (3) 
COMM-508 The Media and Government (3) 
COMM-509 Politics and the Media (3) 
COMM-5 10 Women in Journalism (3) 
COMM-51 1 History of Documentary (3) 

or 

COMM-5 15 Media, Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-5 14 Censorship and the Media (3) 
COMM-5 16 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) 
COMM-546 Foreign Policy and the Press (3) 
COMM-547 Great Books in U.S. Joumalism (3) 
COMM-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of the 

student's advisor 
COMM-599 Media, Technology and Society (3) 

Print Journalism Track (27 credit liours) 

• COMM-322 Editorial Policies and Methods (3) 

• COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

• COMM-425 Advanced Reporting (3) 

• Three courses from the following: 

COMM-323 Computer Techniques for Communication 

Studies (3) 
COMM-325 Feature Article Wnting (3) 
COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 
COMM-391 Internship (3) 

or 
COMM-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) 

or 

COMM-491 Senior Professional lntemship(3) 
COMM-502 In-Depth Joumalism (3) 
COMM-521 Opinion Wnting (3) 
COMM-545 Business and Economic Joumalism (3) 
COMM-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of the 
student's advisor 

• Three courses from the following: 

COMM-270 How the News Media Shaped History 2:2 (3) 

or 
COMM-275 Dissident Media: Voices from the 
Underground 4:2 (3) 



COMM-280 Contemporary Media in a Global 
Society 3:2 (3) 

COMM-396 Selected Topics (3) with permission of the 
student's advisor 

COMM-490 Independent Study Project (3) 

COMM-504 Joumalism Ethics (3) 

COMM-505 History of Broadcast Joumalism (3) 

COMM-508 The Media and Government (3) 

COMM-509 Politics and the Media (3) 

COMM-5 10 Women in Joumalism (3) 

COMM-51 1 History of Documentary (3) 
or 

COMM-5 15 Media. Children, and Society (3) 

COMM-514 Censorship and the Media (3) 

COMM-546 Foreign Policy and the Press (3) 

COMM-547 Great Books in U.S. Joumalism (3) 

COMM-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of the 
student's advisor 

COMM-599 Media, Technology and Society (3) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu academic. depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. Tlie department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisly master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements witlim three years from the date of tiret en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

B.A. in Communication: 

Public Communication 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale). Students .should declare 



212 School of Communication 



their major by the end of the sophomore year and no earlier than 
the end of the freshman year. 

Students who are unable to achieve a cumulative grade 
point axerage of 2.50 and declare a major in communication are 
not allowed to take courses in the school after they have com- 
pleted 60 hours of undergraduate credit. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39 credit hours w ith grades of C or better within the School of 
Communication including core, professional, internship, 
independent study, and independent reading courses. 

• Related course requirements taken outside the School of 
Communication with grades of C or better 

• A minimum of 81 credit hours outside the field of 
communication, including at least 65 credit hours in the 
liberal arts and sciences, are required for the major 

Subject to the appro\al of an advisor, a ma.\imum of 12 credit 
hours in communication transferred from another uni\ersity 
may be substituted for required communication courses. Trans- 
fer students majoring in public communication are required to 
graduate with a total of 84 credit hours outside the field of com- 
munication. 

Related Course Requirement 
Students must complete the following with grades of C or better: 

• 3 credit hours in American history (HlST-xxx) 

• 3 credit hours in economics (ECON-xxx) 

or 

MKTG-250 Fundamentals of Business and Marketing for 
Communications (3) 

• A minor or second major outside the School of 
Communication 

Communication Course Requirements (39 credit hours) 
Core Courses (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-100 Understanding Media 4:1 (3) 

• COMM-200 Writing for Mass Communication (3) 

• COMM-209 Communication and Society (3) 

Professional Courses (30 credit hours) 

• COMM-301 Public Relations (3) 

• COMM-337 Public Relations Writing (3) 

• COMM-346 Public Relations Case Studies (3) 



• COMM-380 Public Communication Research (3) 

• COMM-t37 Public Relations Portfolio (3) 

• 1 5 credit hours from the following, with no more than 9 credit 
hours from any one cluster: 

Skills 

COMM-105 Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 

COMM-310 Public Speaking (3) 

COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 

COMM-521 Opinion Writmg (3) 

COMM-532 Publication Layout and Design (3) 

COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media: 
Magazine Writing (3) 
Human Communication 

COMM-300 Interpersonal Communication (3) 

COMM-470 Organizational Communication (3) 

COMM^72 Nonverbal Communication (3) 

COMM-475 Group Communication Management (3) 
Media Studies 

COMM-327 The PR Presidency (3) 

COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

COMM-509 Politics and the Media (3) 

COMM-5 14 Censorship and Media (3) 

COMM-5 1 5 Media, Children, and Society (3) 

COMM-533 Ethical Persuasion (3) 

COMM-534 Race, Gender, and the Media (3) 
The Practice of Public Relations 

COMM-531 Political Communication (3) 

COMM-536 Entertainment Communication (3) 

COMM-537 Sports Communication (3) 

COMM-539 International Public Relations (3) . 
Experiential Education 

A maximum of 3 credit hours from: 

COMM-391 Internship (3) 

COMM-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) 

C0MM^91 Senior Professional Internship (3) 
University- Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); 
Le\el 11 Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu^academic.depls'honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University ofters sUidents the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 



School of Communication 2 1 3 



ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be apphed to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

B.A. in Communication: 

Film and Media Arts 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale). Students should declare 
their major by the end of the sophomore year and no earlier than 
the end of the freshman year. 

Students who are unable to achieve a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.50 and declare a major in communication are 
not allowed to take courses in the school after they have com- 
pleted 60 hours of undergraduate credit. 
Universit> Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39-42 credit hours with grades of C or better within the 
School of Communication including core, basic, 
professional, media studies, internship, independent study 
and independent reading courses. 

• Related course requirements taken outside the School of 
Communication with grades of C or better 

Subject to the approval of an advisor, a maximum of 12 credit 
hours in communication transferred from another university 
may be substituted for required communication courses. 
Related Course Requirement 
Students must complete the following with grades of C or better: 

• 3 credit hours in American history (HIST-xxx) 

• 3 credit hours in economics (ECON-xxx) 

or 

MKTG-25() Fundamentals of Business and Marketing for 
Communications (3) 



• A minor or second major outside the School of 
Communication 

Course Requirements (39-42 credit hours) 
Core Courses (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-100 Understanding Media 4:1 (3) 

• COMM-105 Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 

• COMM-200 Writing for Mass Communication (3 ) 

Basic Courses (9-12 credit hours) 

• COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

• COMM-33 1 Film and Video Production 1 (3) 

• One or both of the following: 
COMM-350 Digital Imaging and Design (3) 
COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 

Professional Courses (15-18 credit hours) 
Inlermediate (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-482 Writing for Visual Media (3) 

• At least 6 credit hours from the followiing: 
COMM-434 Film and Video Production II (3) 
COMM-435 Introduction to Studio Television (3) 
COMM-454 Motion Graphics and Effects (3) 
COMM-523 Intermediate Photography: 

Photojoumalism (3) 
Fine Arts Photography (3) 
Advanced 

• 6 credit hours in visual media shidies from the following: 
COMM-503 Broadcast Operations and Management (3) 
COMM-511 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-513 Producing Film and Video (3) 
COMM-5 14 Censorship and Media (3) 
COMM-515 Media. Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-5 16 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) 
COMM-5 17 History of Cross-Culmral Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 

COMM-527 History of Photography (3) 
COMM-550 Financing and Marketing Independent 

Productions (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
COMM-585 Directing (3) (Prague) 
COMM-586 History of Czech Cinema (3) (Prague) 

• Additional credit hours may be selected from the following to 
bring the total to 39^2 credit hours: 

COMM-438 Production Practicum (1-3) 
COMM-456 Dramatic Production (3) 
COMM-464 Directing for Camera (3) 
COMM-486 Documentary Production (3) 
COMM-39I Senior Internship (3) 

or 
COMM-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) 

or 

COMM-491 Senior Professional Internship (3) 
COMM-529 Large Fomial and Commercial Photography (3) 



214 School of Communication 



COMM-561 Advanced Writing for Film (3) 
COMM-562 Advanced Writing for Television (3) 
COMM-565 Advanced Visual Media Portfolio (3) 
COMM-584 Film Technology and Practice (6) (Prague) 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 12 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level I Options ( 100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level II Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level III Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departtnental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 
ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is earned and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

B.A. in Foreign Language and 
Communication Media 

Admission to the Program 

Students are admitted either to the School of Communica- 
tion or to the Department of Language and Foreign Studies in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Formal admission to the For- 
eign Language and Communication Media (FLCM) major re- 
quires a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.50. 
Students who are unable to achieve a 2.50 GPA and declare a 
major in FLCM are not allowed to take courses in the School of 
Communication after they have completed 60 credit hours of 
undergraduate credit. 
Program Tracks 

French. German, Russian, or Spanish combined with 
Broadcast Journalism. Print Journalism. Public Communica- 
tion, or Film and Media Arts 
University Requirements 

• A total of 1 20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 



• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 57 credit hours with grades of C or better 

• Prerequisite competency in the major language at the 
intermediate level 

Course Requirements 

Foundation (6 credit hours) 

• COMM-100 Understanding Media 4:1 (3) 

• COMM-200 Writing for Mass Communication (3) 

Foreign Language (18 credit hours) 

• 1 8 credit hours of courses in the major language (French, 
German, Russian, or Spanish) at the 300 level or above taken 
in the Department of Language and Foreign Studies 

Contemporary Culture (6 credit hours) 

• Two courses related to any contemporary culture as approved 
by advisor 

Linguistics (3 credit hours) 

• One of the following: 

ANTH-225 Language and Human E.xperience 1 :2 (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 
TESL-5xx linguistics course as approved by advisor 
Communication (24 credit hours) 

• Three media studies courses from the School of 
Communication, with at least one at the 300-level or above; 
and five professional courses in one of the four 
communication program tracks: broadcast journalism, print 
journalism, public communication, or visual media: 

Broadcast Journalism 

• TIrree media studies courses with at least one at the 300-level 
or above, as approved by advisor 

• COMM-320 Reporting (3) 

• COMM-333 Fundamentals of TV and VTR (3) 

• COMM-385 Broadcast Journalism I (3) 

• COMM-428 Broadcast Journalism II (3) 

• COMM^32 Television Field Reporting (3) 
Print Journalism 

• Three media studies courses with at least one at the 300-level 
or above, as approved by advisor 

• COMM-320 Reporting (3) 

• COMM-322 Editorial Policies and Methods (3) 

• COMM-425 Advanced Reporting (3) 



School of Communication 215 



• Two from the following: 

COMM-323 Computer Techniques for Communication 

Studies (3) 
COMM-325 Feature Article Writing (3) 
COMM-326 Sports Journalism (3) 
COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 
COMM-502 In-Depth Journalism (3) 
COMM-521 Opinion Writing (3) 
COMM-545 Business and Economic Journalism (3) 
Public Communication 

• COMM-209 Communication and Society (3) 

• Two additional media studies courses with at least one at the 
300-level or above, as approved by advisor 

• COMM-301 Public Relations (3) 

• COMM-337 Public Relations Writing (3) 

• COMM-346 Public Relations Case Studies (3) 

• COMM-380 Public Communication Research (3) 

• COMM-437 Public Relations Media (3) 
Film and Media Arts 

• COMM-105 Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 

• Two additional media studies courses with at least one at the 
300-level or above, as approved by advisor 

• COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

• COMM-331 Film and Video Production I (3) 

• COMM-350 Digital Imaging and Design (3) 

• COMM-382 Writing for Visual Media (3) 

• One additional course approved by advisor 
University Honors Program 

All University Honors students must complete at least 1 2 
credit hours of advanced-level (300-level and above) Honors 
courses including a 3 to 6 credit hour Honors Senior Capstone 
Project. Students may graduate with University Honors in the 
major if they complete at least 12 advanced-level Honors 
courses including the Senior Capstone Project in the depart- 
ment. Each department has three levels of University Honors 
requirements: Level 1 Options { 100-200-level Honors classes); 
Level 11 Options (300-level and above Honors classes); and 
Level 111 Options (Honors Senior Capstone). The department 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. For more informa- 
tion, go to www.american.edu/'academic.depts/honors/ . 
Combined Bachelor's and Master's Degrees 

American University offers students the opportunity to earn 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees through its acceler- 
ated bachelor's/master's programs. Undergraduate students 
may complete up to 3 credits for every 9 credits required for the 
graduate degree that may be applied to the requirements for 
both degree programs. The department that oversees the gradu- 



ate program the student enters will determine if the courses the 
undergraduate student completes will satisfy master's degree 
requirements. 

Bachelor's/master's students must complete at least 18 
in-residence credit hours at the graduate level after the bache- 
lor's degree is eamed and maintain continuous, sequential en- 
rollment in the two programs. Students must finish the master's 
degree requirements within three years from the date of first en- 
rollment in the master's program. 

Minor in Communication 

• 18 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• COMM- 100 Understanding Media 4:1 (3) 

• COMM-200 Writing for Mass Communication (3) 

• Two courses fi'om the following: 
COMM-301 Public Relations (3) 
COMM-3 1 Public Speaking (3) 
COMM-320 Reporting ( 3 ) 

COMM-322 Editorial Policies and Methods (3) 
COMM-325 Feaftire Article Writing (3) 
COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 
COMM-331 Film and Video Production I (3) 
COMM-435 Introduction to Sftidio Television (3) 
COMM^VO Organizational Communication (3) 
COMM-472 Nonverbal Communication (3) 
COMM-475 Group Communication Management (3) 
COMM-521 Opinion Writing (3) 
COMM-532 Publication Layout and Design (3) 

• Two courses from the following: 

COMM -401 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 
COMM-503 Broadcast Operations and Management (3) 
COMM-508 The Media and Government (3) 
COMM-509 Politics and the Media (3) 
COMM-511 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-5 13 Producing Film and Video (3) 
COMM-5 14 Censorship and Media (3) 
COMM-5 15 Media, Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-5 17 History of Cross-Culmral Cinema (3) 
COMM-527 History of Photography (3) 
COMM-545 Business and Economic Journalism (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
COMM-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of the 

student's advisor 
COMM-599 Media, Technology and Society (3) 



216 School of Communication 



Graduate Programs 



Designed tor students with diverse professional and educa- 
tional backgrounds, the graduate programs fiiUy utilize the re- 
sources of Washington, D.C. for both field work and classroom 
study. The many professional news organizations, public inter- 
est organizations, trade associations, government agencies, 
public relations firms, and media production organizations in 
the Washington area provide excellent opportunities for intern- 
ships and cooperative education field experience. Special semi- 
nars and events, including the school's American Forum and 
Media Center presentations, enable students to meet major pub- 
lic figures and film and media artists. 

M.A. in Communication: 

Journalism and Public Affairs 

Admission to the Program 

Applicants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study. Admission to the program requires a bache- 
lor's degree from an accredited college or university with at 
least a 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) grade point average in last 60 hours 
of undergraduate course work. International students whose 
first language is not English should take the TOEFL examina- 
fion to demonstrate proficiency in written as well as spoken 
English. All applicants must eam a satisfactory score on the 
Graduate Record Examination (ORE) General (verbal, quanfi- 
tative, and analytical). 

Previous professional or campus experience in communica- 
tion is useful but not required. However, all applicants are re- 
quired to show evidence of professional commitment and career 
direction related to the specialization and track they choose. Offi- 
cial transcripts, two letters of recommendation, and a 1,000- word 
essay on the applicant's commitment to pursuing graduate study 
in the program are submitted with the application. If available, 
samples of published professional or college news writing, scripts, 
or tapes should also be submitted. 

A limited number of graduate fellowships and assistantships 
are awarded on the basis of merit as well as school and program 
needs. 

Admission to the fiill-time degree program is for the fall se- 
mester Students are generally expected to complete the pro- 
gram in ten months. The program is also available in a weekend 
format which takes twenty months to complete (see below). 

Qualified undergraduate students may apply to a combined 
bachelor 's/M. A. program and use up to 6 credit hours of 
500-level courses to satisfy the requirements of both degrees. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30-33 credit hours of approved graduate work, as advised 
Most students are required to take COMM-624 Principles 
and Practice of Journalism and receive a grade of B or better. 
Students who have earned a B or better in a news-media law 
course within five years of enrollment may petition to be 
exempted from COMM-601 Legal Aspects of 
Communication. International students are normally 



exempted from this course. Students with extensive 
professional editing experience may petition to be exempted 
from COMM-62 1 Advanced Editing. 

• Continuous fiill-time enrollment 

• A grade point average of 3.00 maintained during all work 
toward the degree 

• Comprehensive examination in journalism 
Specializations and Tracks 

Public Policy Journalism, Intemational Journalism, Economic 
Communication (each taken in either the print or broadcast jour- 
nalism track). Interactive Journalism, or News Media Studies 
Course Requirements 

Public Policy Journalism 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• COMM-601 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

• COMM-624 Principles and Practice of Journalism (3) (with 
a grade of B or better) 

• COMM-7 1 Seminar in Public Affairs (3) (with a grade of 
B or better) 

• COMM-724 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) 
Elective! (12 credit hours) 

• Four elective courses approved by the program director 
One or two courses outside the School of Communication in 
an area related to public affairs may be substittjted for 
journalism electives with permission of the program director. 
Possible areas include political science, public 
administration, history, economics, the range of social 
sciences, and intemational relations. 

Broadcast Track (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-632 Television Field Reporting (3) 

• COMM-721 Broadcast News 1 (3) 

• COMM-722 Broadcast News II (3) (with a grade of B or 
better) 

Print Track (9 credit hows) 

• COMM-62 1 Advanced Editing (3) 

• COMM-636 Washington Reporting (3) 

• COMM-720 Seminar in Journalism (3) (with a grade of B 
or better) 

International Journalism 
Core (IS credit hours) 

• COMM-546 Foreign Policy and the Press (3) 

• COMM-601 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

• COMM-624 Principles and Practice of Journalism (3) (with 
a grade of B or better) 

• COMM-7 1 Seminar in Public Affairs (3) (with 
intemational emphasis and a grade of B or better) 



School of Communication 217 



• COMM-724 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) (with 
international emphasis) 

Broadcast Truck (18 credit hours) 

• COMM-632 Television Field Reporting (3) 

• COMM-721 Broadcast News 1(3) 

• COMM-722 Broadcast News 11 (3) (with international 
emphasis and a grade of B or better) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 

Two international relations courses outside the School of 
Communication 
COMM-xxx elective course 
Print Track (18 credit hours) 

• COMM-621 Advanced Editing (3) 

• COMM-636 Washington Reporting (3) (with international 
emphasis) 

• COMM-720 Seminar in Journalism (3) (with a grade of B 
or better) 

• 9 credit hours from the following: 

Two international relations courses outside the School of 
Communication 
COMM-xxx elective course 
Economic Communication 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• COMM-601 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

• COMM-624 Principles and Practice of Journalism (3) (with 
a grade of B or better) 

• COMM-710 Seminar in Public Affairs (3) (with emphasis 
on economic and business coverage and with a grade of B 
or better) 

• COMM-724 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) (with emphasis 
on economic and business coverage) 

Economics (12 credit hours) 

• 12 credit hours from the following: 
ECON-500 Microeconomics (3) 
ECON-50 1 Macroeconomics (3) 
ECON-522 Econometrics (3) 
ECON-546 Industrial Economics (3) 
ECON-573 Labor Economics (3) 
ECON-579 Environmental Economics (3) 
ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 
ECON-619 U.S. Economic History (3) 

Broadcast Track (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-632 Television Field Reporting (3) 

• COMM-72 1 Broadcast News I (3) 

• COMM-722 Broadcast News II (3) (with a grade of B or 
better) 

Print Track (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-545 Business and Economic Journalism (3) (with a 
grade ofB or better) 



• Economics or business elective course (3) 

• COMM-xxx elective course (3) 

Interactive Journalism 

Core (12 credit hours) 

• COMM-504 Journalism Ethics (3) 

• COMM-601 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

• COMM-710 Seminar in Public Affairs (3) (with a grade of 
B or better) 

• COMM-724 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) (with an 
emphasis on online research and reporting) 

Interactive Journalism (18 credit hours) 

• COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media (3) 

• COMM-599 Media, Technology and Society (3) 

• COMM-621 Advanced Editing (3) 

• COMM-720 Seminar in Journalism (3) (with a grade of B or 
better) 

• COMM-721 Broadcast News 1 (3) 

• COMM-502 In-Depth Journalism (3) 

or 

COMM-722 Broadcast News II (3) 
or other approved elective course 

News Media Studies 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• COMM-504 Journalism Ethics (3) 

• COMM-601 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

• COMM-710 Seminar in Public Affairs (3) (with a grade of 
B or better) 

• COMM-724 Reporting of Public Affairs (3) (with an 
emphasis on how stories arc chosen and developed, their 
effect and the media response) 

News Media Studies (18 credit hours) 

• COMM-508 The Media and Government (3) 

• COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media (3) 

• COMM-546 Foreign Policy and the Press (3) 

• COMM-545 Business and Economic Journalism (3) 

• COMM-599 Media, Technology and Society (3) 

• COMM-720 Seminar in Journalism (3) (with a grade of B 
or better) 

Weekend Graduate Program in Communication: 
Journalism and Public Affairs 

TTie weekend M.A. program in journalism and public affairs 
is for professionals whose schedules make Saturday classes a 
preferable alternative to full-time .study. Admission require- 
ments arc the same us for the full-time program and for the fall 
semester only. Students are expected to complete the program 
within a twenty-month period. 



218 School of Communication 



M.A. in Communication: 
Public Communication 



Admission to the Program 

Applicants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for graduate shidy. Admission to the program requires a bache- 
lor's degree from an accredited college or university with at 
least a 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) grade point average in last 60 hours 
of undergraduate course work. International students whose 
first language is not English should take the TOEFL examina- 
tion to demonstrate proficiency in written as well as spoken 
English. All applicants must earn a satisfactory score on the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General (verbal, quanti- 
tative, and analytical). 

Previous academic or professional work in public commu- 
nication is not required, but all applicants must demonstrate a 
serious commitment to a career in this field. The ability to speak 
and write English well is essential. Official transcripts, two let- 
ters of recommendation, and a 1.000-word essay on the appli- 
cant's commitment to pursuing graduate study in the program 
are submitted with the application. Interviews are not required, 
but may be recommended by the school. 

Admission is open to both full-time and part-time students 
for the fall semester. Full-time students are generally expected 
to complete the program in ten months. Part-time stude